Me and Orson Welles

  • Directors: Richard Linklater
  • Producers: Ann Carli, Richard Linklater, Marc Samuelson
  • Writers: Screenplay, Holly Gent Palmo, Vincent Palmo Jr, Novel, Robert Kaplow
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Zac Efron, Christian McKay, Claire Danes, Ben Chaplin

In New York in 1937, 17-year-old Richard Samuels (Efron) meets theatre director Orson Welles (McKay), whom he convinces to give him the role of Lucillus in Julius Caesar, Broadway’s first Shakespearean production. Welles, who is having an extramarital affair with the leading actress while his wife is pregnant, couples Richard with production assistant Sonja Jones (Danes) to rehearse. Welles decides the entire production crew would benefit from a coupling game, and Richard cheats to ensure he is paired with Sonja.[1]

High School Musical

  • Directors: Kenny Ortega
  • Producers: Don Schain
  • Writers: Peter Barsocchini
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Family, Musical, Romance
  • Actors: Zac Efron, Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley Tisdale, Lucas Grabeel, Corbin Bleu, Monique Coleman

East High School’s basketball star Troy Bolton (Zac Efron) and math-whiz Gabriella Montez (Vanessa Hudgens) meet at a New Year’s Eve party at a ski lodge over Christmas Break. Here, they take part in a karaoke contest and sing (“Start Of Something New”). They discover they have a great chemistry between them and end up exchanging numbers.

A week later, Gabriella’s mother is transferred and Gabriella begins classes at East High in Albuquerque, New Mexico where Troy sees her in homeroom. After making sure that it is she on his cell phone, Troy accidentally gets detention, along with Gabriella, his best friend and teammate Chad Danforth (Corbin Bleu), scholastic decathlon captain and head of the science club Taylor McKessie (Monique Coleman), and Drama Club co-presidents Ryan (Lucas Grabeel) and Sharpay Evans (Ashley Tisdale).

After homeroom, Troy and Gabriella see each other again and as they start talking near the sign-up sheet for the winter musical auditions, Sharpay sees them and assumes that Gabriella is interested in signing up. With Ryan’s help, Sharpay determines that Gabriella is an “Einsteinette”, and puts an article of her previous academic achievements into Taylor’s locker.

During detention, Taylor approaches Gabriella and invites her to join the school’s scholastic decathlon team. Due to their detention, both Troy and Chad miss their basketball practice, much to the annoyance of Coach Bolton. During a confrontation between the coach (Bart Johnson) and Ms. Darbus (Alyson Reed), it is made clear that neither of them has any real respect for the work that the other does. Troy eventually takes part in basketball practice, but he cannot seem to stop thinking about Gabriella and how he might actually enjoy singing (“Get’cha Head In The Game”).

In the end, Ms. Darbus decides to award the lead roles to Troy and Gabriella, making Sharpay and Ryan understudies (and at the basketball game, Sharpay accepts her defeat and tells Gabriella to “break a leg”). After winning both the scholastic decathlon and the basketball game with Troy’s last minute shot, Chad gives Troy the winning ball and later asks Taylor out to the victory party. The film ends with the entire school gathering in the gym to celebrate (“We’re All In This Together”).

High School Musical 3 Senior Year

  • Directors: Kenny Ortega
  • Producers: Bill Borden, Barry Rosenbush, Don Schain
  • Writers: Peter Barsocchini
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Family, Musical, Romance
  • Actors: Zac Efron, Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley Tisdale, Lucas Grabeel, Corbin Bleu, Monique Coleman

It’s the end of the Wildcats’ championship basketball game against the West High Knights, where team captain Troy (Zac Efron) immediately rallies their spirits (“Now Or Never”).

With the team’s spirit raised, they win, thanks to the winning shot from their newest team member Jimmie “The Rocket” Zara (Matt Prokop).

Later, at Troy’s after-match party at his house, Troy and Gabriella (Vanessa Hudgens) are seen thinking about their future and wishing that their last few months at East High would not end (“Right Here, Right Now”).

Sharpay (Ashley Tisdale) meets Tiara Gold (Jemma McKenzie-Brown), a British exchange student whom she hires to be her personal assistant.

When drama teacher Ms. Darbus (Alyson Reed) notices that there were so few sign-ups for the spring musical, Sharpay suggests she could do a one-woman show. This alarms Kelsi (Olesya Rulin), who is writing the show, so she signs up everyone in the class for it instead. This results in Ms. Darbus announcing they will create a play about their final days at East High. In addition, she reveals that Sharpay, Ryan (Lucas Grabeel), Kelsi, and Troy have all been considered for a scholarship at Juilliard, but only one of them is to be chosen. Sharpay becomes desperate to win the scholarship, and knowing that Kelsi will give the best songs to Troy and Gabriella in the musical, she gets Ryan to try to persuade Kelsi to give them a song, by predicting her (and Ryan’s) future (“I Want It All”).

The six stars walk down the field where a curtain closes off the graduation ceremony and turns into a stage. The six stars do their signature jump and then the camera does a close up of each actor. They take their final bow as the curtain closes. The end credits are in the style of a high school yearbook.

Hairspray

  • Directors: Adam Shankman
  • Producers: Adam Shankman, Craig Zadan, Neil Meron, Bob Shaye, Marc Shaiman, Scott Wittman, Toby Emmerich
  • Writers: John Waters, Thomas Meehan, Leslie Dixon, Mark O Donnell
  • Genres: Comedy, Musical, Romance
  • Actors: Nikki Blonsky, John Travolta, Michelle Pfeiffer, Christopher Walken, James Marsden, Zac Efron, Amanda Bynes, Queen Latifah, Brittany Snow, Elijah Kelley, Allison Janney, Taylor Parks, Jerry Stiller, Paul Dooley

May 3, 1962. Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky), a cheerful, rotund high school student living in Baltimore, Maryland steps out of her apartment (“Good Morning Baltimore”), only to endure a day’s worth of school so she and her best friend Penny Pingleton (Amanda Bynes) can race home to view their favorite TV show, The Corny Collins Show. The program, a teen dance show, is broadcast from Baltimore’s station WYZT on weekday afternoons (“The Nicest Kids in Town”).

The teenagers featured on the show attend Tracy and Penny’s school, among them the arrogant and wealthy Amber Von Tussle (Brittany Snow) and her boyfriend Link Larkin (Zac Efron), the lead male dancer on the show. Amber’s mother, Velma (Michelle Pfeiffer) manages station WYZT and goes out of her way to make sure that Amber is prominently featured and that The Corny Collins Show remains a racially segregated program. Corny Collins (James Marsden) and all of his “Council Members” are white; black kids are only allowed on The Corny Collins Show on “Negro Day”, held the last Tuesday of each month and hosted by local R&B radio disc jockey Motormouth Maybelle (Queen Latifah), who also owns her own record shop on North Avenue.

Against all expectations, Little Inez receives the most votes and wins the pageant, officially integrating The Corny Collins Show. A perturbed Velma loudly declares her frustration, informing her daughter of the tally-switching scheme. Unknown to Velma, Edna and Wilbur have turned a camera on her, and Velma’s outburst is broadcast on the air, causing her to be fired from the program. Meanwhile, The Corny Collins Show set explodes into a celebration as Tracy and Link cement their love with a kiss (“You Can’t Stop the Beat”).

17 Again

  • Directors: Burr Steers
  • Producers: Adam Shankman, Jennifer Gibgot
  • Writers:
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Zac Efron, Matthew Perry, Leslie Mann, Thomas Lennon, Michelle Trachtenberg, Sterling Knight

In this film, popular high school senior Mike O’Donnell (Zac Efron) seemingly has it all. He is a star athlete headed straight for a college scholarship, until he finds out his high school girlfriend, Scarlett is pregnant. He then decides to give up his scholarship and settle down.

Twenty years later, an adult Mike (Matthew Perry) finds his life is not exactly what he expected. He is separated from his wife, Scarlett (Leslie Mann), and living with his best friend Ned Gold (Thomas Lennon), his career at a pharmaceutical company is at a standstill, and his relationships with his teenage children are nonexistent. After getting passed up for yet another promotion at work, he returns to his high school to reminisce over his basketball awards and the life he could have had. While he is reliving his past, he is approached by a janitor (Brian Doyle-Murray) and shares with him how things were so much better when he was 17.

As Mike is driving home from the high school, he sees the mysterious janitor standing on the ledge preparing to jump into the Los Angeles River. Mike rushes out of his car to rescue him, but when he gets there, the janitor has vanished. What Mike doesn’t realize is that he is about to fall into the river and turn into his 17 year old self.

Through his experiences, Mike realizes that he had chosen the perfect life–he just never appreciated it and so he learns a lesson by turning into a 17 year old.