Why Did I Get Married Too

  • Directors: Tyler Perry
  • Producers: Tyler Perry, Reuben Cannon
  • Writers: Tyler Perry
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson, Jill Scott

The film is about the difficulty of maintaining a solid relationship in modern times. Eight married college friends plus one other non-friend (all of whom have achieved middle to upper class economic status) go to Colorado for their annual week-long reunion, but the mood shifts when one couple’s infidelity comes to light. Secrets are revealed and each couple begins to question their own marriage. Over the course of the week, the couples battle with issues of commitment, betrayal and forgiveness and examine their lives as individuals and as committed couples. This film explores the resultant emotional impact that fidelity and love have upon the constitution of marriage.

Four couples, who are also best friends, converge on a house in the mountains for a week-long retreat that has become their ritual of sorts to help work out their marital problems and ask the question “Why did I get married?”. Though the couples have committed to being physically present for the week, some of them have not been emotionally present in their respective marriages for quite some time. The week is not planned out in a well-programmed sequence, so the events unfold somewhat spontaneously, beginning with their “adventures” in getting up to the mountain retreat.

Dianne goes to see Terry and begs him to come back after crying over her list. He plays with her head a little to get back at her, but they eventually reconcile too and all the couples converge on the gala celebration for an award that Patricia has received for her work. Dianne, Patricia and Angela are shocked when Sheila introduces Troy as her husband. Ex-husband Mike, although he is still with Trina, is very jealous of Sheila’s newfound bliss and tries to weasel his way back into her good graces, but she tells him to go enjoy his “20”, referring to the 80-20 rule.

Push Based on the Novel by Sapphire

  • Directors: Lee Daniels
  • Producers: Lee Daniels, Oprah Winfrey, Tyler Perry, Sarah Siegel Magness, Gary Magness
  • Writers: Novel, Sapphire, Screenplay, Geoffrey Fletcher
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Gabourey Sidibe, Mo Nique, Paula Patton, Mariah Carey, Lenny Kravitz

In 1987, obese, illiterate, black 16-year-old Claireece “Precious” Jones (Gabourey Sidibe) lives in the New York City neighborhood of Harlem with her dysfunctional family; she has been raped and impregnated twice by her father, Carl, and suffers constant physical, mental and sexual abuse from her unemployed mother, Mary (Mo’Nique). The family resides in a Section 8 tenement and subsists on welfare. Her first child, known only as “Mongo” (short for “Mongoloid”), has Down Syndrome and is being cared for by Precious’s grandmother. After Precious becomes pregnant for the second time, she is suspended from school. Her junior high school principal, Mrs. Lichtenstein (Nealla Gordon) arranges to have her attend an alternative school, which she hopes can help Precious change her life’s direction.[6]

Precious fights to find a way out of her traumatic daily existence through imagination and fantasy. While she is being raped by her father, she looks at the ceiling and imagines herself in a music video shoot; in the video, she is the superstar and the focus of attention. While looking in photo albums, she imagines the pictures talking to her. When she looks in the mirror, she sees a pretty, white, thin, blonde girl. In her mind there is another world, one in which, unlike her real one, she is loved and appreciated.

Inspired by her new teacher Miss Rain (Paula Patton), Precious begins learning to read. She gives birth to her second child and names him Abdul. After Precious’s mother deliberately drops three-day-old Abdul and hits Precious, Precious fights back long enough to get her son and flees her home permanently. She finds new confidence with the help of her teacher, Miss Rain, and begins raising her son in a half-way house while she continues to improve academically. Her mother comes back into her life to inform Precious that her father has died of AIDS. Later, Precious finds out that she is HIV positive, but Abdul is not. The film ends with Precious still resolved to improve for herself and for her children. She severs ties with her family and makes plans to complete a General Educational Development test.

I Can Do Bad All by Myself

  • Directors: Tyler Perry
  • Producers: Tyler Perry
  • Writers: Tyler Perry
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Taraji P Henson, Adam Rodriguez, Brian J White, Mary J Blige, Gladys Knight, Marvin Winans, and, Tyler Perry

April (Taraji P. Henson), a selfish alcoholic singer, is performing at a nightclub where she works. On the other side of town, Madea (Tyler Perry) and Uncle Joe (Perry) catch Jennifer (Hope Olaide Wilson), Manny (Kwesi Boakye), and Byron (Frederick Siglar) breaking into their house. After hearing the children’s troubles, Madea welcomes them and feeds them. Jennifer tells Madea that they’re living with their Grandmother who they have not seen in four days. They tell Madea that their only other relative is their aunt, April. April shares her home with her shady boyfriend, Randy (Brian J. White), who’s married with children. The next morning, Madea brings the kids to April’s house but April doesn’t want to be bothered. Meanwhile, Pastor Brian (Marvin Winans) sends a Colombian immigrant named Sandino (Adam Rodriguez) to her house for work and a place to stay. April puts Sandino in her basement and wants to lock him down there because she doesn’t know him that well. While working around the house, Sandino surprises April by cleaning himself up and becoming very handsome. When Randy arrives, he sees April with the kids and Sandino and heckles him while making makes subtle advances at Jennifer.

Shortly after, Pastor Brian and Wilma (Gladys Knight), a church member, comes to informs April that her mother died from a fatal brain aneurysm while riding on a bus. April is devestated by the news and seeks comfort from Randy, however he is sleeping and shruggs off April’s attempt to seek comfort. Later Sandino comforts April as she tells him about her mother’s death and the last time she spoke with her. Depressed, Jennifer goes to Madea wanting to know how to pray. However, Madea, inexperienced with prayer, attempts to instruct in a scene that plays out comically. The same night, Wilma sings “The Need to Be”, an uplifting song for women and Tanya (Mary J. Blige), the nightclub bartender, sings “I Can Do Bad”. After singing the song, Tanya is fed up with April’s attitude and tries to help her friend despite that she can’t help April if she can’t help herself. Over time, Sandino and April become friends and Sandino fixes a ruined bedroom in her house making Manny and Bryon happy expect Jennifer who feels April doesn’t want them there. While on a date, Sandino tells April he doesn’t understand why she is with Randy and askes if she loves Randy. He tells her what true loves is to him. One Sunday morning, Sandino eagerly knocks on April’s bedroom door to get April ready for church, but Randy threatens to kill Sandino if he continues to spend time with April.

Time passes and April and Sandino get married. They hold a block party for their reception with Tanya sings “Good Woman Down” dedicated to April with the new couple embracing each other.

Madea Goes to Jail

  • Directors: Tyler Perry
  • Producers: Tyler Perry, Reuben Cannon
  • Writers: Tyler Perry
  • Genres: Comedy, Crime, Drama
  • Actors: Tyler Perry, Keshia Knight Pulliam, Derek Luke, Robin Coleman, Jackson Walker, Drew Sidora, David Mann, Tamela J Mann, Sofia Vergara

After a high-speed freeway chase (as shown at the end of Perry’s previous film Meet the Browns) puts Madea (Tyler Perry) in front of the judge (Mablean Ephriam), her reprieve is short-lived when she goes to the store and destroys a woman’s car after she cuts in front of her. Judge Mathis (as himself) gives her a sentence of five years. A gleeful Joe (Perry) couldn’t be happier at Madea’s misfortune. But Madea’s eccentric friend Mr. Brown and their illegitimate daughter Cora (David and Tamela Mann) rally behind her with the help of Joe’s lawyer son Brian (Perry) who is tired of Madea and Joe getting into trouble, lending their special “country” brand of support.

Meanwhile, (DeKalb County, Georgia) assistant district attorney Joshua Hardaway (Derek Luke) is on the fast track to career success. But Hardaway lands a case too personal to handle – defending a young prostitute and former drug addict Candace Washington (Keshia Knight Pulliam), whom he is apparently already acquainted with – and asks his fiancée and fellow ADA Linda Davis (Ion Overman) to fill in on his behalf. After the trial, Joshua, who has paid Candace’s bail, meets with a church activist friend of his Ellen (Viola Davis), who tries to help a wary Candace, who seems somewhat bitter and angry about her circumstances, but determined to be a survivor. Joshua and Candace talk briefly over lunch, and it is implied that the two had some past dealings with one another as college students.

Because of the now-revealed news of Linda’s tampering with client files, there is a public outcry and a protest movement gains momentum to set Madea and the others free. Candace, Madea and some other women that Linda represented have their convictions overturned and are released. Madea goes home with Brown, Cora, and Bryan, and Candace goes home with Joshua.