Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines made out of glue and macaroni (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Jumanji

  • Directors: Joe Johnston
  • Producers: Robert W Cort, Ted Field, Larry J Franco
  • Writers: Chris Van Allsburg, Greg Taylor, Jonathan Hensleigh
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy, Romance, Thriller
  • Actors: Robin Williams, Jonathan Hyde, Kirsten Dunst, Bonnie Hunt, Bebe Neuwirth, David Alan Grier, Adam Hann Byrd, Patricia Clarkson

In 1869, two brothers, Caleb and Benjamin, go into the woods, start digging, and bury a box. Benjamin asks what would happen if someone found it. Caleb replies, “May God have mercy on his soul.”

One hundred years later, in 1969, 12-year-old Alan Parrish, a member of a wealthy and respectable upper-class family in Brantford, New Hampshire, is escaping bullies on his bike. He flees to his father’s shoe factory where he meets his friend Carl, who works for his father. Carl has designed a trainer that he hopes will be successful; however, Alan accidentally damages it and costs Carl his job.

After being ambushed by the bullies outside the factory and having his bike stolen, Alan is drawn to a strange sound of drumbeats in a nearby construction site, which leads him to a locked trunk containing a mysterious board game within, called “Jumanji”. He takes it home and later has an argument with his father Samuel (Jonathan Hyde), who, very proud of the way Alan took on Billy Jessup and the other bullies, is proposing to send him to a boarding school that other Parrishes, such as himself, have also attended.

Alan prepares to run away after his parents go out for the night; however, before he can leave, his friend Sarah Whittle arrives, having brought back his bike. They play the game, the instructions of which read:

Meanwhile, on a beach in France, a pair of children walk along, hearing some strange drums beating. Not far from them, almost fully buried in the sand, is Jumanji…

3 Men and a Baby

  • Directors: Leonard Nimoy
  • Producers: Robert W Cort, Ted Field
  • Writers: Jim Cruickshank, James Orr, Coline Serreau
  • Genres: Comedy, Family, Drama
  • Actors: Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg, Ted Danson, Nancy Travis, Lisa and Michelle Blair

Peter Mitchell (Selleck), Michael Kellam (Guttenberg) and Jack Holden (Danson) are happy living their lives as bachelors in their lofty New York City apartment. They all have girlfriends, jobs and a carefree lifestyle. This is disrupted when a baby arrives on their doorstep one day. A note with the child, Mary, indicates that it is Holden’s, the result of an affair with a recent co-star actress. The baby arrives in Holden’s absence—he is in Turkey shooting a movie, leaving Peter and Michael to fend for themselves in taking care of the newborn, something in which their lack of experience befuddles them.

At one point, Peter and Michael are mistakenly led to believe that they are to deliver Mary to two men who arrive at their door asking for “the package”. They discover moments before their departure that the men are drug dealers who were actually seeking a package of heroin. They retrieve the infant, leaving the men with a bottle of powdered milk.

What results is a major change to the men’s lives as they try to adjust to surrogate fatherhood—balancing the demands of work, a social schedule and the rearing of a child. Soon their paternal instincts take hold, and they grow attached to the child.

At the end of the movie the baby’s mother, a British woman named Sylvia (Nancy Travis), arrives, asking for Mary back. Moments before her departure back to England, she realizes she cannot give up her career to raise her daughter alone. The men, having grown attached to the child, invite her to move into their apartment with them.