An Inconvenient Truth

  • Directors: Davis Guggenheim
  • Producers: Lawrence Bender, Scott Z Burns, Laurie David, Co Producer Line Producer, Lesley Chilcott, Executive Producer, Jeffrey D Ivers, Jeff Skoll, Ricky Strauss, Diane Weyermann
  • Writers: Al Gore
  • Genres: Documentary
  • Actors: Al Gore

An Inconvenient Truth focuses on Al Gore and his travels in support of his efforts to educate the public about the severity of the climate crisis. Gore says, “I’ve been trying to tell this story for a long time and I feel as if I’ve failed to get the message across.”[4] The film documents a Keynote presentation (dubbed “the slide show”) that Gore has presented throughout the world. It intersperses Gore’s exploration of data and predictions regarding climate change and its potential for disaster with his own life story.

The former vice president opens the film by greeting an audience with a joke: “I am Al Gore; I used to be the next President of the United States.”[5] After laughter from the crowd, Gore begins his slide show on climate change; a comprehensive presentation replete with detailed graphs, flow charts and stark visuals. Gore shows off several majestic photographs of the Earth taken from multiple space missions, Earthrise and The Blue Marble.[6] Gore notes that these photos dramatically transformed the way we see the Earth; helping spark modern environmentalism.

Following this, Gore shares vivid anecdotes that inspired his passion for the issue, including his college education with early climate expert Roger Revelle at Harvard University, his sister’s death from lung cancer and his young son’s near-fatal car accident. Gore recalls a story from his grade school years, where a fellow student asked his geography teacher about continental drift; in response, the teacher called the concept the “most ridiculous thing [he’d] ever heard.” Gore ties this conclusion to the assumption that “the Earth is so big, we can’t possibly have any lasting, harmful impact on the Earth’s environment.” For comic effect, Gore uses a clip from the Futurama episode “Crimes of the Hot” to describe the greenhouse effect. Gore refers to his loss to George W. Bush in the 2000 United States presidential election as a “hard blow” yet subsequently “brought into clear focus, the mission [he] had been pursuing for all these years.”

Gore’s book of the same title was published concurrently with the theatrical release of the documentary. The book contains additional information, scientific analysis, and Gore’s commentary on the issues presented in the documentary. A 2007 documentary entitled An Update with Former Vice President Al Gore features Gore discussing additional information that came to light after the film was completed, such as Hurricane Katrina, coral reef depletion, glacial earthquake activity on the Greenland ice sheet, wildfires, and trapped methane gas release associated with permafrost melting.[10]

The Bourne Ultimatum

  • Directors: Paul Greengrass
  • Producers: Patrick Crowley, Frank Marshall
  • Writers: Screenplay, Tony Gilroy, Scott Z Burns, George Nolfi, Tom Stoppard, Story, Tony Gilroy, Novel, Robert Ludlum
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, David Strathairn, Scott Glenn, Paddy Considine, Edgar Ramirez, with Albert Finney, and Joan Allen

The movie begins before the end of the events in The Bourne Supremacy, as Bourne, wounded by a gunshot from the Russian assassin Kirill, is still evading the Moscow police. Cornered by two officers while breaking into a medical clinic to treat his wounds, Bourne overpowers the officers, knocking one out, while holding the second at gunpoint. He leaves them alive as he escapes, saying, My argument is not with you.

Six weeks later, Simon Ross, a security correspondent for The Guardian, meets with someone in Turin, to discuss Treadstone. Bourne goes to Paris to tell Marie’s brother, Martin, of her death, then heads to London. Bourne then reads an article in The Guardian by Ross about Bourne, Treadstone, and “Operation Blackbriar.” He then arranges to meet Ross in London at the south entrance of Waterloo Station. Ross, however, is under surveillance because his use of the word “Blackbriar” in a phone call to his editor was tracked by ECHELON, alerting the CIA. CIA section chief Noah Vosen alerts his staff at the Anti-Terrorism Deep Cover in New York to find out any information on Ross, believing that Operation Blackbriar has been compromised.

After receiving a call from Bourne, Ross takes a taxi to Waterloo Station. At the station, Bourne sees CIA officers following Ross and places a prepaid mobile phone on him; through it, Bourne instructs him on how to dodge the station’s surveillance. However, Vosen orders an assassin, Paz, to kill Ross and his source. Vosen’s team identifies Bourne on a security camera and recognizes him as the original Treadstone assassin, and assumes he is Ross’s source. While Paz gets into position with a sniper rifle, Bourne tells Ross to remain hidden, but Ross panics and steps out into the open, allowing Paz to deliver a clear kill shot. In the chaos, Bourne grabs Ross’s notes, revealing his source as Neil Daniels, the Madrid CIA station chief.

Images of Bourne’s unmoving body floating in the river are interspersed with images of Nicky watching a news report, sometime later, noting the exposure of Blackbriar, the arrests of Hirsch and Vosen, that Ezra Kramer is the subject of a United States Senate hearing regarding his conduct, and that David Webb, alias Jason Bourne, was shot and fell into the East River but his body has not been recovered, even after a three-day search, at which point Nicky smiles. In the final moments of the film Bourne is shown swimming away in the East River.