Get Him to the Greek

  • Directors: Nicholas Stoller
  • Producers: Judd Apatow, Nicholas Stoller, David Bushell, Rodney Rothman
  • Writers: Nicholas Stoller, Jason Segel
  • Genres: more
  • Actors: Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss, Rose Byrne, Colm Meaney, Sean Combs

Aaron Green (Jonah Hill) is a driven, idealistic young college graduate who works as an intern at a record company. Aaron is given his big break when he is sent to transport flaky English musician Aldous Snow (Russell Brand) to a concert at Los Angeles’ Greek Theater.

28 Weeks Later

  • Directors: Juan Carlos Fresnadillo
  • Producers: Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich, Enrique Lopez Lavigne, Co Producer, Bernard Bellew, Executive Producer, Danny Boyle, Alex Garland
  • Writers: Juan Carlos Fresnadillo, Enrique Lopez Lavigne, Rowan Joffe
  • Genres: Action, Horror, Sci-Fi, Thriller
  • Actors: Robert Carlyle, Rose Byrne, Jeremy Renner, Catherine McCormack, Imogen Poots, Mackintosh Muggleton, Harold Perrineau, Idris Elba

Don (Robert Carlyle) and his wife Alice (Catherine McCormack) live in a barricaded cottage they share with four others, somewhere in rural Great Britain. They let a terrified boy inside, and moments later, a pack of the infected attack and enter the house. Alice refuses to leave without the boy; Don abandons Alice and escapes as the sole survivor.

Over the course of 28 weeks following the original outbreak, the infected have all starved to death and Britain has been declared relatively safe. An American-led NATO force, under the command of United States Army Brigadier General Stone (Idris Elba), begins repopulating the country. Amongst the new population are Tammy (Imogen Poots) and Andy (Mackintosh Muggleton), Don and Alice’s children, who were in Spain during the initial outbreak. During their subsequent medical inspection, Major Scarlet Ross (Rose Byrne), chief medical officer of District 1, notes Andy’s differently coloured eyes, a trait inherited from his mother. They are subsequently admitted to District 1, a heavily guarded zone of London on the Isle of Dogs guarded by the US Army. Sergeant Doyle (Jeremy Renner), and his friend, Flynn (Harold Perrineau), a helicopter pilot, are amongst the military presence charged with guarding District 1. The children are reunited with their father who is now head caretaker of the district.

28 days pass. Calls for help and screams can be heard over the radio of Flynn’s now abandoned helicopter. A swarm of infected are shown sprinting through a subway exit. As they run into the open, the Eiffel Tower comes into view, revealing that the Rage virus has spread to mainland Europe.

The Dead Girl

  • Directors: Karen Moncrieff
  • Producers: Eric Karten, Gary Lucchesi, Tom Rosenberg, Kevin Turen, Henry Winterstern
  • Writers: Karen Moncrieff
  • Genres: Drama, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Toni Collette, Brittany Murphy, Rose Byrne, Marcia Gay Harden, Mary Beth Hurt, Kerry Washington

The Dead Girl is a quintet of stories about seemingly unrelated people whose lives converge around the murder of a young woman (portrayed by Brittany Murphy). The characters in the film are linked not only by their connection to her murder, but also by the difficult hand that life has dealt them. The film scrutinizes their inner struggles to overcome or surrender to their misfortunes.

The first story, titled The Stranger, focuses on Arden (Toni Collette), a quiet and diffident woman who lives with and cares for her verbally abusive, invalid mother (Piper Laurie). Arden is the character who finds the titular body and alerts the authorities, much to her mother’s dismay. She later encounters Rudy (Giovanni Ribisi), a grocery clerk obsessed with serial killers, and agrees to meet him for a date. While Arden prepares for the date in secrecy, her mother calls for her assistance. Upon her arrival to her mother’s room, Arden is berated with questions as to her appearance. Arden reacts angrily and attacks her mother before packing her suitcase and leaving home. She then meets Rudy and has masochistic sex with him.

The second story, The Sister, revolves around Leah (Rose Byrne), a depressed forensics student who prepares the titular body for an autopsy. She is obsessed with the idea that the body belongs to her sister who went missing a number of years ago. She resents the fact that her parents (Mary Steenburgen and Bruce Davison) are still searching for her lost sister and won’t accept that she is not coming back. When Leah convinces herself that the dead girl was her sister, she feels great relief and begins a relationship with her colleague, Derek (James Franco). Their blossoming romance is cut short, however, when she finds out that the dead girl is in fact not her sister. Leah is overwhelmed with sorrow and regret, but finds some solace in Derek, whom she asks for help.

The fifth and final story is called The Dead Girl and takes place a few days before Krista, the titular character, is murdered. Although she has had a hard life, Krista has a positive outlook and a sweet nature. She buys a big stuffed toy and asks her john, Tarlow (Josh Brolin), to drive her to Norwalk where her daughter lives, as her daughter’s birthday is the next day. Tarlow refuses at the last minute, however, so she has to borrow her landlord’s motorbike. Before she sets off, however, she attacks Tom (Dennis Keiffer), a man who had recently just beaten her girlfriend, Rosetta. She rings Rosetta and tells her that she’ll pick up her daughter and all three of them will move away and start a better life together. She asks Rosetta to tell her she loves her, but Rosetta simply tells her she has to go back to bed. Krista continues her journey to Norwalk but the motorbike breaks down and she has to hitchhike the rest of the way. She hitches a lift with Carl, who promises to take her to Norwalk. She is elated that she will make it there in time for her daughter’s birthday. The story ends with Krista smiling in the passenger seat of Carl’s car, wearing a pink vest previously seen in the storage space found by Ruth (Carl’s wife). She notes the time, 12:13 a.m., which was seen written on her arm while Leah (the Sister) was examining her body in the morgue.

Adam

  • Directors: Max Mayer
  • Producers: Miranda De Pencier, Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech
  • Writers: Max Mayer
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Romance
  • Actors: Hugh Dancy, Rose Byrne, Peter Gallagher, Amy Irving, Frankie Faison

Adam (Hugh Dancy) is a young man afflicted by Asperger syndrome. He has difficulties communicating with others and likes to escape into his love of space exploration. When Beth (Rose Byrne), a school teacher, moves into the apartment above him, begins to build the personal relationship with her that he so desperately desires.[1]

Knowing

  • Directors: Alex Proyas
  • Producers: Todd Black, Jason Blumenthal, Steve Tisch
  • Writers: Story, Ryne Douglas Pearson, Screenplay, Ryne Douglas Pearson, Alex Proyas, Stuart Hazeldine, Juliet Snowden, Stiles White
  • Genres: Action, Mystery, Sci-Fi, Thriller
  • Actors: Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne

In 1959, at William Dawes Elementary School in Lexington, Massachusetts, a time capsule containing the students’ drawings of their ideas of the future is buried and set to be ceremoniously opened 50 years later. As opposed to the drawings of the other children, a girl named Lucinda Embry contributes a page full of seemingly random digits which she continued to write until her teacher took her paper away. That night, Lucinda is found in a school closet, where her fingers are bloodied and she complains about hearing voices. On the door she scratched the final numbers that she never got to put on her paper.

In 2009, the time capsule is opened and the drawings are given to the current students. A boy named Caleb receives Lucinda’s envelope. His father John Koestler, a widower and professor of astrophysics at MIT takes notice in the paper, and further examination makes him realize that part of these digits form dates and death tolls of every major disaster over the past fifty years, in chronological order, and suggests three disasters yet to come. Meanwhile, Caleb begins receiving visits from mysterious figures in overcoats (listed in the credits as “The Strangers”), and during his encounters he hears their overlapping telepathic whispers.

At Lucinda’s mobile home, John finds the children with the four Strangers as a glowing vessel descends from the sky. The Strangers dispossess themselves of their human appearance, revealing themselves to be glowing, translucent figures surrounded by wisps of light. The Strangers invite those who can hear their whispers to leave Earth with them. After convincing Caleb and Abby to go with The Strangers, John collapses and sobs as the vessel departs. From the vantage point of space, other ships are seen taking off from all around Earth. John travels to Boston to be with his sister and parents. While he had previously been an atheist, John tells his estranged father, a Christian minister, that he now believes that the family, including his late wife, will be together in the afterlife as he had also told Caleb. John and his family embrace as the solar flare strikes Earth and incinerates all life on the planet. Elsewhere, Caleb and Abby are dropped off in an otherworldly field, and the film ends as the two make their way towards a prominent solitary tree in the distance.