I Love You Phillip Morris

  • Directors: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa
  • Producers: Luc Besson, Andrew Lazar, Far Shariat
  • Writers: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa, Steve McVicker
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Jim Carrey, Ewan McGregor, Leslie Mann, Rodrigo Santoro

Steven Russell began his life as a normal family with children and his wife, Debbie, and a job in the police force. To the outside world, it appears that he and Debbie are very much in love with each other; with friends of the family clearly wincing uncomfortably when Steven and Debbie begin kissing in front of them. It soon becomes apparent that Steven is simply a cop to find his birth mother; he successfully manages to locate her; however, she subsequently rejects him which sets off a train of events in Steven’s life. Steven then proceeds to crash his car. He is seriously injured and as he is being taken away on a stretcher, he tells the paramedics that he is going to become openly homosexual and states that he is going to tell his wife. We then see Steven living the ‘high life’ with his new boyfried, Jimmy, of whom he showers with expensive gifts. Jimmy, however, clearly uncomfortable with this. Steven then decides that his job is inadequate to fund his newly found ‘expensive gay lifestyle’, so he declines into criminal activity and eventually is put into prison for insurance fraud – but not before he puts himself into hospital and tries to escape by jumping off the hospital roof; Jimmy then tells Steven he doesn’t want to see him again. Once in prison, Steven meets shy and quiet Phillip Morris in the Law library. He tells him he is a Lawyer and gives him ‘legal’ advice about his sick friend. They then begin corresponding via letters when Morris is transferred over to the Michael Wing until, eventually, Steven gets himself transferred over to that wing of the prison and into the same cell as Morris. They continue their relationship inside the prison, blissfully happy, until Steven is then transferred to a different prison and then is released into the community. He then fraudlently claims himself to be a Lawyer and manages to secure Morris’s early release. They then move in together. Morris asks Steven, thinking he is a Lawyer, to help his friend out with a legal case. He wins this case, and clearly feels so empowered he applies and successfully gets a job as the finance manager with a top firm. He then embezzles the company out of thousands of dollars and is only found out with a colleague of his is reading over the accounts and notices the deficiency. He then attempts to run away with Morris, but Morris declines to leave and drives away, leaving Steven to face his fate alone. Steven then does not see Morris again until the end of the film; however, he tries (and is successful) in escaping from the jail many times; by stealing green marker pens and dying his prison outfit green posing as a nurse and other various surprisingly simple schemes. He is, however, quickly recovered after these schemes and returned to prison. He then attempts one final scheme – he forgives medical documents in order to fool doctors into thinking he has aids and eventually fakes his own death. Morris is then informed by his cell mate that Russell has died; however, 5 minutes after he was told, he was taken to meet his ‘lawyer'(Russell, posing as a Lawyer) and slaps him after realising that Russell faked his own death to get out of prison. The film then ends when one of the directors of the company he embezzled thousands of dollars from bumps into him into the court toilet (where the director was a juror) and he is then arrested whilst he was trying to secure Morris’s release. He is then given an unprecedented jail sentence.

300

  • Directors: Zack Snyder
  • Producers: Frank Miller, Zack Snyder, Gianni Nunnari, Jeffrey Silver, Mark Canton
  • Writers: Screenplay, Zack Snyder, Kurt Johnstad, Michael Gordon, Comic Book, Frank Miller, Lynn Varley
  • Genres: Action, History, War
  • Actors: Gerard Butler, Lena Headey, David Wenham, Dominic West, Vincent Regan, Rodrigo Santoro

Through Dilios’ narration, the life of young Leonidas is depicted, chronicling his journey from a boy to a man per Spartan doctrine. Years later, after Leonidas is crowned King, Persian messengers arrive at the gates of Sparta demanding its submission to King Xerxes. Offended by their threats and behavior, King Leonidas and his guards kick the messengers into a well. Knowing that these actions will precipitate a Persian attack, Leonidas visits the Ephors — ancient priests whose blessing he needs to convince the Spartan council to authorize going to war. He proposes a strategy to repel the numerically superior Persians by using the terrain of Thermopylae (the Hot Gates)—his plan involves funneling the Persians into a narrow pass between the rocks and the sea. The Ephors consult the Oracle, who decrees that Sparta must not go to war. After Leonidas departs a messenger from Xerxes appears, rewarding the Ephors for their covert support and revealing that they have been corrupted by Xerxes.

Denied by the Ephors, Leonidas follows his plan anyway. While he does not require the council’s permission for this, taking such a small force, turns what had been a bold strategy into a certain suicide mission. Leonidas hopes that the sacrifice of himself and his men will spur the council to defy the Ephors and all of Greece to unite against the threat to freedom and democracy (represented by Greece) posed by slavery and tyranny (represented by Persia).

In Sparta, Queen Gorgo reluctantly submits sexually to the influential Theron in exchange for help in persuading the Spartan council to send reinforcements to Leonidas. Following her address to the Council, Theron publicly betrays the Queen, prompting the councilmen to cry out in outrage and Gorgo to kill him out of rage, which spills open a bag of Xerxes’ gold from his robe. The exposure of Theron’s treachery, along with their Queen’s plea, prompts the Council to unite against Persia. Meanwhile, at Thermopylae, the Persians use the goat path to surround the Spartans. Xerxes’ general demands their surrender, again offering Leonidas titles and prestige. Leonidas seemingly bows in submission, allowing one of his men to leap over him and kill the general. A furious Xerxes orders his troops to attack. As Persian archers shoot at the remaining Spartans, Leonidas rises and hurls his spear at Xerxes, cutting the King on the cheek, thus making good on his promise to make “the God-King bleed.” Visibly disturbed by this reminder of his own mortality, Xerxes watches as all of the Spartans are cut down by a massive barrage of arrows. Concluding his tale before an audience of attentive Spartans, Dilios declares that the Persian army, depleted by desertions out of fear the heavy casualties they suffered at the hands of a mere 300 Spartans, now faces 10,000 Spartans commanding 30,000 Greeks. Although still outnumbered, Dilios declares that the Greeks shall have victory. Praising Leonidas’ sacrifice, Dilios leads the assembled Greek army in a charge against the Persian army, the Battle of Plataea.