Furry Vengeance

  • Directors: Roger Kumble
  • Producers: Brendan Fraser, Keith Goldberg, Ira Shuman, Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Michael Carnes, Josh Gilbert
  • Genres: Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Brendan Fraser, Brooke Shields, Matt Prokop

A real estate developer (Fraser) is given the task to develop a forest into a development by his boss (Jeong) but the animals who live in the forest have other plans.

Big Daddy

  • Directors: Dennis Dugan
  • Producers: Joseph M Caracciolo, Allen Covert, Michelle Holdsworth, Adam Sandler, Robert Simonds, Mary P Winn, Jack Giarraputo, Alex Siskin
  • Writers: Steve Franks, Tim Herlihy, Adam Sandler
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams, Jon Stewart, Rob Schneider, Dylan Sprouse, Cole Sprouse, Leslie Mann, Steve Buscemi, Peter Dante, Joseph Bologna, Josh Mostel

Sonny Koufax (Sandler) is a carefree, unmotivated slob, who has declined to take on adult roles and responsibilities. He has earned a law degree, but has chosen not to even attempt to take the bar exam, since he was awarded $200,000 in an automobile accident years prior and lives off his restitution. He is employed, on a part time basis only, as a toll booth collector. His best friend is a kind-hearted delivery guy named Nazo (Rob Schneider) who stops by every so often. Sonny also has a habit of frequently harassing his roommate’s girlfriend, Corrine (Leslie Mann) about her previous employment at Hooters every chance he gets.

The film shows Sonny’s friends, all former schoolmates, are “moving ahead” in their lives. His roommate Kevin Garrity (Jon Stewart) decides to ask Corrine to marry him and that is another thing that irritates Sonny. Kevin decides to pop the question the day before he is leaving for China for his law firm. Two of his male friends from school, in contrast to their conduct in Sonny’s experience while at school, are now revealed to be homosexual and in a committed domestic partnership. Sonny’s girlfriend (Kristy Swanson), disgusted and perplexed at Sonny’s contrasting and inconsistent conduct decides to end her romantic relationship with him. Not to mention find a new much older man with more reliability.

One year, three months, and six days later, Sonny, now a lawyer and married to Layla with a child of their own, is surprised with a birthday party at Hooters attended by all his colleagues and friends, including Julian, but is more surprised to find his ex-girlfriend working as a Hooters girl and her boyfriend with his so called five-year plan working the grill.

Just Married

  • Directors: Shawn Levy
  • Producers: Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Sam Harper
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance
  • Actors: Ashton Kutcher, Brittany Murphy

The film starts off with Tom and Sarah in the airport.A few months earlier, Tom Leezak (Ashton Kutcher) and Sarah McNerney (Brittany Murphy) meet up when Tom accidentally hits Sarah with a football. A few months later, despite opposition from Sarah’s rich, uptight family they get married. However they each have a secret that they want to keep from each other: Tom doesn’t want Sarah to know that he accidentally killed her dog and Sarah doesn’t want Tom to know she slept with Peter Prentiss. Tom and Sarah decide to honeymoon at a classy hotel at the foot of the Alps. On their way there they attempt to join the mile high club, but fail when the captain turns on the fasten seat belt sign and they are forced to go back to their seats.

They arrive at the hotel and discover that Tom’s friend Kyle left them a present: the Thunderstick A-2000, which is a sex toy. Tom tries to plug the toy in the socket, but the plug isn’t built for a European outlet and he shuts down the entire village’s electricity when he tries to force it in. The newlyweds leave the hotel after Tom has a heated argument with the hotel owner. While trying to find another hotel they crash and get buried under a heap of snow, but they are able to climb out in the morning. Eventually, they get a ride from a truck driver and end up staying at a pensione in Venice. The pensione turns out to be very bad, and they soon check out after Tom discovers a cockroach on his neck while the couple are making love.

The film switches to the present, where Sarah has moved out and Tom wants to get back with her. Upon receiving advice from his father, Tom attempts to break into Sarah’s family’s household to tell her that he loves her, but gives up after unsuccessfully trying to ram the gate with a German Shepherd blocking the front gate. However Sarah opens the gate after seeing Tom make a romantic speech to the camera and the two rush out to proclaim their love for each other. The film ends with the couple recounting events from the honeymoon and Sarah’s family finally approving of their marriage and people from town knowing everything about it. There is also the chance for some interviews after the marriage has been confirmed by the priest who married Tom and Sarah.

The Spy Next Door

  • Directors: Brian Levant
  • Producers: Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Screenplay, Jonathan Bernstein, James Greer, Gregory Poirier, Story, Jonathan Bernstein, James Greer
  • Genres: Action, Comedy
  • Actors: Jackie Chan, with Magnus Scheving, Billy Ray Cyrus, and George Lopez, Amber Valletta, Madeline Carroll, Will Shadley

While babysitting his neighbor’s children, a mild-mannered man (Jackie Chan) winds up having to fight off secret agents after one of the kids inadvertently downloads a secret code.

The Wedding Singer

  • Directors: Frank Coraci
  • Producers: Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Tim Herlihy
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance, Music
  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore, Christine Taylor, Allen Covert, Steve Buscemi, Jon Lovitz

In 1985, Robbie Hart (Adam Sandler) is a wedding singer from the town of Ridgefield, New Jersey. Engaged to his long-time girlfriend, Linda (Angela Featherstone), he meets and befriends a waitress, Julia Sullivan (Drew Barrymore), at the reception hall where he is performing one night. Julia is also engaged, to fiancé Glenn Gulia (Matthew Glave).

On his wedding day, Robbie is devastated when Linda leaves him standing at the altar. She later faces him at his home, telling him that his failure to move on with his singing career led her to change her mind. Robbie tries to move forward with his life, but his despair hinders his performances. Julia tries to cheer him up, and later asks him to help her plan her own wedding. Initially reluctant, Robbie eventually agrees, and their friendship blossoms as they spend more time together and become closer.

Julia’s cousin, Holly (Christine Taylor), asks to be set up on a double date with Robbie and Glenn. Julia becomes jealous when Holly throws herself at Robbie and drinks to excess. Holly takes her to the bathroom, and while the girls are away, Glenn brazenly admits to Robbie that he has been cheating on Julia for some time and will continue to do so, even after the wedding. At the end of the evening, Robbie, with a pained expression, watches Glenn take Julia home. Robbie later takes Holly home, and when he rebuffs her advances, Holly realizes that he is in love with Julia.

The movie closes with Julia and Robbie’s wedding, as the band, with the best man (an uncredited Steve Buscemi, who played another best man earlier in the film) singing “True” with the wedding ensemble.

Happy Gilmore

  • Directors: Dennis Dugan
  • Producers: Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Tim Herlihy, Adam Sandler
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance, Sport
  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Carl Weathers, Julie Bowen, Allen Covert, Frances Bay, Christopher McDonald, Ben Stiller

Happy Gilmore (Adam Sandler) is an aspiring ice hockey player from Waterbury, Connecticut who masters a powerful, and dangreous slapshot that his late father taught him as a child. However, his aggression and poor skating ability render it impossible for him to make any hockey team. His grandmother (Frances Bay), with whom he’s lived almost all his life due to an unfortunate hockey-related incident which killed his father, has not paid her taxes for many years. As such, she owes $270,000 to the IRS and the house that Happy’s grandfather “built with his bare hands” is about to be seized. Grandma Gilmore is forced to temporarily move into a retirement home run as a sweatshop by Hal, the retirement home’s sadistic manager (Ben Stiller in an uncredited role). While repossessing Grandma’s furniture, a pair of movers challenge Happy to shoot golf balls, and his unorthodox hockey slapshot hits 400 yards three times, winning $40 as a result. This gives Happy the idea to go to the driving range to make money with bets on his swing. When ex-golf player and current Club Pro Chubbs Peterson (Carl Weathers) (who was forced to retire when his hand was bitten off by an alligator) sees Happy’s shot, he talks Happy into entering a local tournament by convincing him he can make a lot of money. Happy wins the tournament and earns a spot on the PGA Tour. However, against Chubbs’ advice Happy joins the tour immediately after learning he can make enough money to buy back Grandma’s house.

Shooter is attacked by an angry mob of spectators after he steals the gold jacket from Doug in a fit of hysteria after Happy wins. The film closes with Happy being congratulated by the two-handed ghost of Chubbs, Abraham Lincoln, and the alligator (reference to Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi).

Cheaper by the Dozen

  • Directors: Shawn Levy
  • Producers: Michael Barnathan, Robert Simonds
  • Writers: Craig Titley, Sam Harper, Joel Cohen Alec Sokolow
  • Genres: Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff, Piper Perabo, Tom Welling, Alyson Stoner, Ashton Kutcher

The Baker family is a happy and large family with 12 children who reside in Midland.[disambiguation needed]

One day Tom Baker (Steve Martin) gets an offer for his dream job: Become the coach of the Stallions. Tom returns home with the new job and promotion in the urban near north Chicago suburb of Evanston, Illinois with education advantages and a new vehicle; although Kate approves, his children overhear and object to his proposed actions in a family conference. Even though the children vote about what they would rather do, Tom decides to accept the job and move to the city, many miles away from their current countryside home.

Upon arriving in the new urban community, they are greeted by the neighbors, who take a negative attitude to the Bakers because of the number of their children and the fact that they often “run wild”. One day, aspiring author Kate receives a call, telling her that her new book is perfect and she should go on a promotion tour, so she makes the decision to leave, and leaves her husband alone with the 12 children. Problems soon erupt, but everything comes to a halt when, after being grounded, the Baker kids sneak out and accidentally wreck their friend’s birthday party. Kate ends the book tour and returns home, angry at Tom for not telling her that he could not handle it.

The state of the family’s condition seriously comes to light after Kate discovers a disturbing note on Mark’s bed and Mark has gone missing. The family begins searching, but after calling the police, Tom realizes that Mark’s favorite place has always been the Midland house, and frantically makes his way to the railway station. He soon finds Mark, on a train heading towards Midland. They ride the train together to Midland and are greeted by the family at the railway station the next morning. They apologize to each other and Tom decides to quit his football career to find a job which would provide more time for him to spend with his family. While they return to the city and begin to adjust to their new life, Kate’s book is published and stays at the number one at the bestseller’s list on the book chart for 12 months.

The Waterboy

  • Directors: Frank Coraci
  • Producers: Jack Giarraputo, Robert Simonds, Adam Sandler
  • Writers: Tim Herlihy, Adam Sandler
  • Genres: Comedy, Sport
  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates, Henry Winkler, Fairuza Balk, Jerry Reed

Adam Sandler plays Bobby Boucher (pronounced “Boo-SHAY”), a socially inept (but also intelligent), stuttering, water boy with anger issues due to constant teasing and his mother’s (Kathy Bates) excessive sheltering. He was the water boy for the fictitious University of Louisiana Cougars[2][3] (a name and mascot bearing a strong resemblance to the Louisiana State University Tigers) for the past 18 years (he joined sometime around the 1980-81 season), but the players tormented him, and the team’s head coach, Coach Red Beaulieu, (Jerry Reed) fired him for disrupting his team’s practices. His attempt to become the new waterboy of his favorite wrestler, Captain Insano (Paul Wight, aka The Big Show), is unsuccessful because he reveals that he is in fact 31 years old. As a result, Captain Insano and the TV presenter laugh and Bobby, offended, hangs up before they answer. He later goes to Coach Klein (Henry Winkler), coach of the fictitious “South Central Louisiana State University Mud Dogs” (a name and mascot strongly resembling the former University of Southwestern Louisiana Bulldogs), and volunteers to work as the team’s water boy for free after seeing the filthy water that the coach provides his players.

During his first few hours of being waterboy for the Mud Dogs, one of the players spits into the water can. A flashback is then seen when the waterboy was a young kid working for the Cougars. Coach Beaulieu refuses the right for the waterboy to retaliate against one of his players for spitting in the cooler. Coach Klein notices his anger problem and encourages Bobby to stand up for himself instead of letting the players walk all over him. After Gee Grenouille (Peter Dante), the team’s captain taunts him, Bobby then sees flashbacks of the people that also made his life a living hell (to name a few: Greg Meaney, Coach Red Beaulieu, Captain Insano and the TV host, Jim Simmonds). Bobby utters the phrase “Stop makin’ fun of me!” signaling that enough is enough.

The line “You can do it!” is referenced in “Original Prankster” by The Offspring. The line is used as a running gag in other Sandler movies, Little Nicky and The Longest Yard and both times was said by Rob Schneider. It was used again in Rob Schneider’s The Animal, this time spoken by Adam Sandler, as well as in Sandler’s Anger Management, but spoken by then-mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani.