Sleepers

  • Directors: Barry Levinson
  • Producers: Barry Levinson, Steve Golin
  • Writers: Screenplay, Barry Levinson, Novel, Lorenzo Carcaterra
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Kevin Bacon, Billy Crudup, Robert De Niro, Minnie Driver, Ron Eldard, Dustin Hoffman, Jason Patric, and Brad Pitt

Lorenzo “Shakes” Carcaterra, Thomas “Tommy” Marcano, Michael Sullivan, and John Reilly are four childhood friends (Joseph Perrino, Jonathan Tucker, Brad Renfro, and Geoffrey Wigdor respectively) who grow up in Hell’s Kitchen, New York City in the mid-1960s. During this time, the local priest, Father Bobby (Robert De Niro), plays a very important part in their lives and keeps an eye on them. However, early on they start running small errands for a local gangster, King Benny (Vittorio Gassman).

On a summer day in 1967, their lives take a sharp turn when they almost kill a man after pulling a prank on a hot dog vendor. As a punishment they are all four sentenced to serve time at the Wilkinson Home for Boys in upstate New York. There, the boys are systematically beaten, abused, and raped by guards Sean Nokes, Henry Addison, Adam Styler, and Ralph Ferguson (Kevin Bacon, Jeffrey Donovan, Lennie Loftin, and Terry Kinney respectively). These traumatic events change the boys and their friendship forever.

Fourteen years later, John and Tommy (Ron Eldard and Billy Crudup), now gangsters, come across Sean Nokes in a pub in Hell’s Kitchen. After making sure that Nokes knows who they are, they both shoot him. Mike (Brad Pitt), now an assistant District Attorney, arranges to be assigned to the case, secretly intending to lose it as a means of getting revenge. Moreover, he and Shakes (Jason Patric), begin to forge a plan to get their revenge on all the responsible guards. Together with many of their lifelong friends, especially Carol (Minnie Driver), a social worker, and King Benny, they manage to collect information on all the Wilkinson guards.

However, to clinch the case they need a key witness who can give John and Tommy an alibi. After a long talk with Father Bobby, including telling him about the awful events at Wilkinson, he agrees to lie on the stand about where John and Tommy were on the night of the shooting; the priest swears under oath that they were with him at Madison Square Garden at a Knicks basketball game. As a result, they are acquited.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines made out of glue and macaroni (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Heat

  • Directors: Michael Mann
  • Producers: Michael Mann, Art Linson
  • Writers: Michael Mann
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Val Kilmer, Tom Sizemore, Diane Venora, Amy Brenneman, Ashley Judd, Mykelti Williamson, Wes Studi, Ted Levine, Dennis Haysbert, William Fichtner, Natalie Portman, Tom Noonan, Kevin Gage, Hank Azaria, Danny Trejo, and Jon Voight

Career thief Neil McCauley (Robert De Niro) leads a team of criminals, including longtime friends Chris Shiherlis (Val Kilmer), Michael Cheritto (Tom Sizemore), and Trejo (Danny Trejo), who carry out a carefully planned armored car heist, stealing US$1.6 million in bearer bonds from Malibu Equity Investments, a shell company run by Roger Van Zant (William Fichtner) that launders drug money through offshore bank accounts. The robbery is complicated by new member Waingro (Kevin Gage) impulsively murdering a guard, forcing the team to execute the remaining guards—potential witnesses—and escape. After the robbery, McCauley meets with his fence, Nate (Jon Voight), who suggests selling the bonds back to Van Zant for 60% of their value instead of laundering them at 60% cost; since the bonds were insured for 100% of their value, Van Zant would make 40% of 1.6 million above his bond insurance while McCauley and his team would gain an additional 20% on top of their expected take.

Later, McCauley and his crew meet at a diner to discuss dividing the money from the robbery. Enraged about the robbery, escalated to capital murder by Waingro, McCauley and his crew attempt to kill Waingro, but when a passing police car distracts them, Waingro escapes. Meanwhile, Van Zant agrees to buy the bonds back, but instructs his men to ambush McCauley at the meeting and take the bonds back. With help from his crew, McCauley escapes the ambush and vows revenge.

McCauley returns to Eady and breaks his longstanding creed, compelling her to flee with him to New Zealand. As he finalizes his plans, Nate reveals Waingro’s whereabouts to McCauley. Confident with his escape plan, McCauley impulsively takes the bait and infiltrates the hotel, activating the fire alarm to vacate the hotel. With the hotel security and police distracted, McCauley barges in and murders Waingro before beginning his escape. Moments later, Hanna arrives at the hotel and from a distance observes Eady waiting in McCauley’s car. As he approaches, McCauley emerges from the building and noticing Hanna, hesitantly defaults to his “thirty seconds” rule and abandons Eady, disappearing into the crowd with Hanna in pursuit. Following a tense cat-and-mouse chase in the darkness of the LAX freight terminal, McCauley nearly gets the drop on Hanna, but Hanna manages to shoot McCauley first, leaving him clinging to life in the fields of the adjoining runways. Hanna holds McCauley’s hand as a mark of mutual respect. Together, the two share a final, quiet moment of reflection and understanding as McCauley dies.

Shark Tale

  • Directors: Rob Letterman, Vicky Jenson, Bibo Bergeron
  • Producers: Jeffrey Katzenberg
  • Writers: Rob Letterman
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Will Smith, Jack Black, Robert De Niro, Angelina Jolie, Martin Scorsese, Ziggy Marley, Doug E Doug, Lenny Venito

The story begins with an underachieving fish named Oscar (Will Smith), who is fantasizing about being rich and famous… while making his way to work as a tongue scrubber at the local Whale Wash. Soon after arriving he is called to the office of his boss, Sykes (Martin Scorsese), to discuss the fact that he owes “five thousand clams” and has to pay it back by the next day. After explaining this to his best friend Angie (Renée Zellweger), she offers him a chance to pay back the money by pawning an heirloom pink pearl. Oscar brings the money to the race track to meet Sykes, but becomes distracted by his wishes of grandeur and places it all on a long-shot bet. Such a large bet is noticed nearby by a beautiful fish named Lola (Angelina Jolie), who flagrantly flirts with Oscar until quickly discovering the truth. Sykes is furious that Oscar bet the money but nonetheless agrees to see how the race turns out. Moments before their “horse” crosses the finish line he trips and falls. The race is lost and Oscar is set to be surreptitiously killed.

Meanwhile, on another side of the ocean, a family of criminally-inclined sharks has a problem with one of their sons, Lenny (Jack Black). Lenny refuses to act the part of a killer and wishes to not have to live up to those expectations. Finally his father, Don Lino (Robert De Niro), loses patience and orders Lenny’s more savage brother, Frankie (Michael Imperioli) to show Lenny the ropes. As the two sharks set out to go in accordance with their father’s wishes, Frankie spots the scene where Oscar is being electrocuted by Ernie and Bernie (Doug E. Doug & Ziggy Marley), Sykes’ two Jamaican jellyfish thugs, and sends Lenny off to attack. The jellyfish spot Lenny and swim off, leaving Oscar alone with him. Lenny frees Oscar but fails to trick Frankie, who becomes annoyed and charges at Oscar until an unknown anchor falls and kills him. Lenny flees, overcome with grief and guilt. As no one saw the deed done and Oscar was seen near the body, everyone thinks he did it, and Oscar sees this as the chance to both redeem himself and receive his fame.

Oscar buys some Valentine’s Day gifts for Angie, but before he can present them to her, he finds that Don Lino has abducted Angie in order to force a meeting. Lenny comes along, now disguised as a dolphin named Sebastian. They arrive at the meeting to find Lola next to Don Lino, while Angie is bound and gagged and presented to Don Lino on a plate, who prepares to eat her if Oscar doesn’t comply. Oscar just laughs and “Sebastian” lunges forward to scoop Angie into his mouth, giving Oscar dominance over the sharks. However, he spends too much time threatening the sharks and doesn’t realize how much pain Lenny is in, and Angie is regurgitated onto the table. Don Lino suddenly realizes it’s Lenny and proceeds to chase Oscar through the reef, but Oscar heads for the whale wash and ends up trapping both sharks. Given an ovation by the other fish, Oscar confesses that he is not a “Sharkslayer” and that it was an anchor that had killed Frankie. He then strongly urges Don Lino not to prejudge people before he knows them properly and to not make the mistake he made in prejudging his wealth, so Don Lino and Lenny reconcile. Oscar forsakes all the wealth he has acquired, makes peace with the sharks, becomes manager of the Whale Wash (now frequented by sharks), and begins dating Angie.

Righteous Kill

  • Directors: Jon Avnet
  • Producers: Avi Lerner, Boaz Davidson, Daniel M Rosenberg, Lati Grobman, Randall Emmett
  • Writers: Russell Gewirtz
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, 50 Cent, Carla Gugino, Donnie Wahlberg, Brian Dennehy, John Leguizamo

The film opens with Detectives Thomas “Turk” Cowan and David “Rooster” Fisk (De Niro and Pacino respectively) shooting targets with pistols and machine guns while cracking jokes to one another. De Niro is shown getting into an argument with an umpire during a children’s baseball game and threatening suspects. At the same time, Pacino is seen defeating multiple opponents in chess.

The movie cuts to Turk staring into the camera confessing to the murders of 14 people. Turk’s “confessions” narrate the story.

Turk and Rooster are working on taking down a drug-dealing club owner called Spider (50 Cent). They plant a wire on a female lawyer caught using drugs, purchased from Spider; wanting to catch him in the act. Spider becomes suspicious and finds the wire. Turk and Rooster rush into Spider’s office and get her out, but not before Spider’s bodyguard aims a gun at them and a shootout begins. Spider’s man is killed and the lawyer gets shot as well. Turk handcuffs Spider and beats him until being pulled away by Rooster.

Turk and Rooster are ordered by their lieutenant (Brian Dennehy) to begin sessions with a therapist. The doctor gives the cops little notebooks to write down whatever feelings they have.

The final scene shows Turk and Corelli in the baseball field.

Brazil

  • Directors: Terry Gilliam
  • Producers: Arnon Milchan, Joseph P Grace
  • Writers: Terry Gilliam, Tom Stoppard, Charles McKeown
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Fantasy, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Michael Palin, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond, Bob Hoskins, Ian Holm

Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) is a low-level government employee, often daydreaming of saving a beautiful maiden. One day he is assigned the task of trying to rectify an error created by a government mishap, causing the incarceration of a Mr. Harry Buttle instead of the suspected terrorist, Harry Tuttle. When Sam visits Mr. Buttle’s widow, he discovers Jill Layton (Kim Greist), the upstairs neighbor of the Buttles, is the same woman as in his dreams. Jill is trying to help Mrs. Buttle find out what happened to her husband, but has gotten sick of dealing with the bureaucracy. Unbeknownst to her, she is now considered a terrorist friend of Tuttle for trying to report the mistake of Buttle’s arrest in Tuttle’s place to bureaucrats that would not admit such a mistake. When Sam tries to approach her, she is very cautious and avoids giving Sam full details, worried the government will track her down. During this time, Sam comes in contact with the real Harry Tuttle (Robert De Niro), a renegade air conditioning specialist who once worked for the government but left due to the amount of paperwork. Tuttle helps Sam deal with two government workers who are taking their time fixing the broken air conditioning in Sam’s apartment.

However, it is quickly revealed this happy ending is all happening inside Sam’s head when in front of the idyllic scene, two faces come into view staring at the camera, that of Jack and of Mr. Helpmann (Peter Vaughan), who as Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Information is the system’s highest official we see in the film. What they are looking at, as they now realize, is Sam having become insane at Jack’s hands. Jack gives up trying to torture Sam, and Sam is left with a smile on his face, humming “Brazil” as Jack moves Mr. Helpmann in his wheelchair away from the scene.

The Untouchables

  • Directors: Brian De Palma
  • Producers: Art Linson, Executive Producer, Raymond Hartwick
  • Writers: Original Novel, Oscar Fraley, Eliot Ness, Screenplay, David Mamet
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, History, Thriller
  • Actors: Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Charles Martin Smith, Robert De Niro

Prohibition in the United States has led to an organized crime wave in the 1920s and early 1930s. Various gangs bootleg vast amounts of alcohol and control their businesses with violence and extortion. The problem is most serious in Chicago, where gang leader Al Capone (Robert De Niro) has almost the whole city (even the Mayor of Chicago) under his control, and supplies poor-quality liquor at high prices. Treasury Department agent Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner) is put in charge of leading the crusade against Capone and his empire. Ness’s initial strategy is to conduct raids using a large squad of uniformed police officers, but his first attempt fails when he breaks into a warehouse storing umbrellas. Capone’s reaction to the next day’s newspaper headlines about the botched raid implies that someone on the force tipped his men off.

Embarrassed over the fiasco and seeking ideas for a change of tactics, Ness has a chance encounter with Jimmy Malone (Sean Connery), an incorruptible Irish beat cop who understands the way Capone does business, and decides to ask for his help. Malone urges Ness to become as ruthless as the gangsters he wants to take down: “He pulls a knife, you pull a gun. He sends one of yours to the hospital, you send one of his to the morgue. That’s the Chicago way, and that’s how you get Capone.” Malone confirms Ness’ suspicion that a cop informed Capone about the earlier raid and suggests that, because of this rampant corruption, Ness should recruit directly from the police academy in order to find team members who have not yet had a chance to come under Capone’s influence. Italian-American trainee George Stone, formerly Giuseppe Petri (Andy García), is enlisted for his superior marksmanship and calm reactions under pressure. Joined by Treasury accountant Oscar Wallace (Charles Martin Smith), detailed to Chicago from Washington, Ness has built an incorruptible team, capable of combating Capone.

As he packs up his office, Ness contemplates the Saint Jude medallion that Malone had carried with him for many years (linked to his call box key), and which Malone had given to him before dying. Ness gives the medallion to Stone, reasoning that since Jude is the patron saint of police officers, Malone would have wanted him to have it. Out on the street, a reporter wishes to have a word from Ness, but Ness modestly downplays his role in the showdown. When the reporter mentions that Prohibition is due to be repealed and asks what Ness might do then, Ness smiles and responds, “I think I’ll have a drink,” then walks away into the busy Chicago streets.

Analyze This

  • Directors: Harold Ramis
  • Producers: Jane Rosenthal, Paula Weinstein
  • Writers: Kenneth Lonergan, Peter Tolan, George Gallo, Harold Ramis
  • Genres: Comedy, Crime
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Billy Crystal, Lisa Kudrow, Chazz Palminteri, Joe Viterelli

The film opens with a montage of mob killings during a past mob war, and a discussion between feared mob boss Paul Vitti (De Niro) and his guardian, Dominic (Joe Rigano) about an upcoming mob meeting that will decide their future. Dominic warns Vitti to be aware of Primo Sindone, Vitti’s rival since their childhood, as he will probably try to kill him before the meeting. Before they can leave, they are attacked by rival gunmen, and the only survivors are Vitti, his bodyguard, Jelly and Jimmy, the driver. A distraught Vitti vows to avenge Dominic.

Meanwhile, a psychiatrist, Ben Sobel (Crystal), is facing his own problems: his son from his first marriage keeps listening to his sessions, his patients are not challenging enough, and his second wedding in Miami is coming soon. Sobel’s life turns completely upside down when he accidentally smashes into a car from behind while driving with his son. The car, it turns out, belongs to Paul Vitti. Jimmy angrily berates Sobel, but Jelly intervenes and takes the blame, despite Jimmy having to tape the trunk to the car (because there was someone bound and gagged in the trunk, narrowly escaping Sobel’s sight). Sobel nonetheless gives Jelly his card in case he changes his mind.

The film ends with Sobel visiting Vitti in Sing Sing prison. Vitti gratefully thanks Sobel for all the help he gave him, and once again tells him “You…you’re good, you…”. They bid farewell and part as Vitti is taken back to his cell by a guard.

Meet the Parents

  • Directors: Jay Roach
  • Producers: Robert De Niro, Jay Roach, Jane Rosenthal, Nancy Tenenbaum
  • Writers: Greg Glienna, Mary Ruth Clarke, James Herzfeld, John Hamburg
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance
  • Actors: Ben Stiller, Robert De Niro, Teri Polo, Blythe Danner

Gaylord M. “Greg” Focker (Ben Stiller) is a male nurse living in Chicago. He intends to propose to his girlfriend Pam Byrnes (Teri Polo), a schoolteacher. His plans are disrupted by the news that Pam’s sister Debbie (Nicole DeHuff) is getting married and Greg and Pam are invited to spend the weekend before the wedding at Pam’s parents’ house in Oyster Bay, New York (on Long Island). Hoping to make the best of the situation, Greg now plans to propose to Pam in front of her family and brings the engagement ring he bought for Pam with him.

At the Byrnes family home, Greg meets Pam’s father Jack (Robert De Niro), mother Dina (Blythe Danner) and their beloved cat Mr. Jinx. Jack takes an instant dislike towards Greg and, subtly at first but more openly as time goes by, criticizes Greg for his choice of career as a male nurse and anything else he sees as a difference between Greg and the Byrnes family. Greg desperately tries to impress Jack but his efforts fail one by one. Greg presents the family with a bottle of cheap champagne he purchased at a local drug store; while trying to open the bottle, the cork flies out of the bottle and hits the urn containing the ashes of Jack’s beloved mother, breaking the urn and spilling the ashes on the ground, upsetting Jack even further.

The movie ends with Debbie and Bob’s wedding and Jack viewing the tapes of Greg recorded by the hidden cameras.