An Education

  • Directors: Lone Scherfig
  • Producers: Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey, Douglas Hansen, Wendy Japhet, Jamie Laurenson, Caroline Levy, James D Stern, David M Thompson
  • Writers: Nick Hornby based on a memoir by Lynn Barber
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Carey Mulligan, Peter Sarsgaard

Following a youth orchestra rehearsal, smart, beautiful school girl Jenny is given a lift home by an charming, older man, David. The two strike up a relationship which includes David’s friends, Danny and Helen. They go to concerts, jazz clubs and take trips away at weekends.

Jenny finds out that David and Danny steal things from houses for sale – not to sell, but to keep. She also finds out that he makes money by moving black families into flats near women who are afraid of them, so he can buy the flats cheap. They make up after she storms off in a huff.

David proposes to Jenny and she drops out of school. However he turns out to be married with children, and she is one of many previous girls, they break up and Jenny enlists her teacher, Miss Stubbs, to help her study for her A-levels she missed. She passes and read English at Oxford University.

Jarhead

  • Directors: Sam Mendes
  • Producers: Douglas Wick, Lucy Fisher
  • Writers: Timothy Lam, Anthony Swofford
  • Genres: Biography, Drama, War
  • Actors: Jake Gyllenhaal, Peter Sarsgaard, Lucas Black, Jamie Foxx, Chris Cooper

The film begins with voice-over narration on a black screen, as Anthony Swofford (Jake Gyllenhaal), waxes philosophically about a soldier whose hands forever remember the grip of a rifle, whatever else they do in life. Swofford is then shown in a U.S. Marine Corps boot camp, being brutalized by a drill instructor in a scene reminiscent of Full Metal Jacket. After finishing boot, “Swoff” is dispatched to Camp Pendleton in 1989, where he is subjected to a cruel joke played on him by the senior Marines. This involves branding onto him the initials of the United States Marine Corps, USMC, with a hot iron. This is a popular tattoo amongst Marines. He faints upon sight of the iron. After regaining consciousness, he is greeted coolly by Troy (Peter Sarsgaard), who says to him, “Welcome to the Suck.”

Swofford comes across the charismatic Staff Sergeant Sykes (Jamie Foxx), a Marine “lifer” who invites Swofford to his Scout Sniper (formally the Surveillance and Target Acquisition) course. After arduous training sessions that claim the life of one recruit, he becomes a sniper and is paired with Troy as his spotter. Shortly after, Kuwait is invaded by Iraq and Swofford’s unit is dispatched to the Persian Gulf as a part of Operation Desert Shield. Although the Marines are very eager to see some combat action, they are forced to hydrate, wait, patrol the nearby area and orient themselves to the arid environment. When some field reporters appear, Sykes forces his unit to demonstrate their NBC suits in a game of American football, even under the 112 degree heat. While the cameras roll, the game develops into a rowdy dogpile, with some Marines playfully miming sex acts. Sykes, embarrassed by his platoon’s rude manners and poor discipline, removes the cameras and crew from the area; the Marines are later punished by being forced to build and take down a massive pyramid of sandbags in a rainy night.

On returning home the troops parade through the towns in a jovial celebration of victory. The mood is disturbed when a disheveled Vietnam veteran, possibly suffering from the memories of the conflict, jumps into their bus, and congratulates them all. Soon after their return home, Swofford and his comrades are discharged and go on with their separate lives. Swofford returns home to his girlfriend, but discovers her with a new boyfriend. Fowler (Evan Jones) is seen to be spending time with a girl at a bar, very likely[citation needed] a prostitute, Kruger (Lucas Black) is seen in a corporate boardroom, Escobar (Laz Alonso) as a supermarket employee, Cortez (Jacob Vargas) as a father of three kids, and Sykes continuing his service as a Master Sergeant in Operation Iraqi Freedom. An unspecified amount of time later, Swofford learns of Troy’s death during a surprise visit from Fergus. He attends the funeral, meets some of his old friends, and afterwards he reminisces about the effects of the war.

Flightplan

  • Directors: Robert Schwentke
  • Producers: Robert DeNozzi, Charles J D Schlissel, Brian Grazer
  • Writers: Peter A Dowling, Billy Ray
  • Genres: Action, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Jodie Foster, Peter Sarsgaard, Sean Bean, Erika Christensen

Kyle Pratt (Jodie Foster) is a propulsion engineer based out of Berlin, Germany. Her husband David died from falling off the roof of an avionic manufacturing building, and now Kyle and her six year-old daughter Julia (Marlene Lawston) are flying home to Long Island to bury him and stay with Kyle’s parents. They fly aboard a fictional Elgin E-474,[1] which Kyle helped design. After falling asleep for a few hours, Kyle wakes to find that Julia is missing. After trying to remain calm at first, she begins to panic, and Captain Marcus Rich (Sean Bean) is forced to conduct a search. Kyle walks the aisles, questioning people, but none of her fellow passengers remembers having seen her daughter either. Shockingly, one of the flight attendants calls in to the airport they just departed from, and the gate attendant says that they have no record of Julia boarding the flight. In addition, according to the passenger manifest, Julia’s seat is registered empty. When Kyle checks for Julia’s boarding pass, it is missing.

Marcus refuses to allow the cargo hold to be searched because he is afraid that the searchers could be hurt if the plane shifted due to turbulence. Both Marcus and the other crew members suspect that Kyle has become unhinged by her husband’s recent death, and has imagined bringing her daughter aboard. Faced with the crew’s increasing skepticism regarding her daughter’s existence, Kyle becomes more and more desperate. Because of her increasingly erratic, panicked behavior, air marshal Gene Carson (Peter Sarsgaard) is ordered by Marcus to guard her.

Kyle, carrying Julia, exits via a cargo door. Everyone watches in shock and amazement as Kyle carries her daughter out onto the tarmac. In the passenger waiting section of the airport, Marcus apologizes to Kyle and leads her to a van which has come to take them the rest of their way. Julia wakes up and sleepily asks “Are we there yet?” The two get in the van and drive away.

Orphan

  • Directors: Jaume Collet Serra
  • Producers: Joel Silver, Erik Olsen, Susan Downey, Jennifer Davisson Killoran, Michael Ireland
  • Writers: Screenplay, David Johnson, Story, Alex Mace
  • Genres: Drama, Horror, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Peter Sarsgaard, Vera Farmiga, Isabelle Fuhrman

After losing a baby, husband and wife, John and Kate adopt a 9-year-old girl who is not nearly as innocent as she claims to be, Kate becomes increasingly alarmed that something evil lurks beneath the girl’s sweet facade and tries to convince her family of Esther’s evil. [2]