Point Break

  • Directors: Kathryn Bigelow
  • Producers: James Cameron, Peter Abrams, Robert L Levy
  • Writers: W Peter Iliff, James Cameron
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Crime, Drama, Sport, Thriller
  • Actors: Patrick Swayze, Keanu Reeves, Gary Busey, Lori Petty, John C McGinley, James LeGros

Johnny Utah (Keanu Reeves), is a rookie FBI agent and former Ohio State quarterback who, with his partner Angelo Pappas (Gary Busey), is investigating a string of bank robberies by a gang of bank robbers known as the Ex-Presidents because they wear masks of former U.S. Presidents Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Pursuing a theory of Pappas’ that the criminals are surfers, Utah goes undercover to infiltrate the surfing community. Knowing little of the sport and lifestyle, Utah persuades orphan surfer girl Tyler Endicott (Lori Petty) to teach him to surf.

In the process, Utah develops a complex relationship with Bodhi (Patrick Swayze), the charismatic leader of a gang of surfers, Roach (James LeGros), Grommet (Bojesse Christopher), and Nathaniel (John Philbin), who accept Utah into their midst as they realize he is a great athlete. As he masters the art of surfing, Utah finds himself increasingly attracted to the surfers’ adrenaline-charged lifestyle, Bodhi’s philosophies, and to Tyler.

Following a clue gotten by analyzing toxins found in the hair of one of the bank robbers, Utah and Pappas lead an FBI raid on another gang of surfers. While criminals, these surfers are not the Ex-Presidents and the raid inadvertently ruins a DEA undercover operation.

Utah eventually catches up with Bodhi two years later at Bells Beach in Australia where a record storm is producing huge, but lethal waves, an event Bodhi had talked about experiencing. After a brutal physical altercation on the surf, Utah manages to handcuff Bodhi to his own wrist, but through Bodhi’s persuasion, releases him to go ride the once-in-a-lifetime wave which will kill him. Utah walks away, throwing his FBI badge into the ocean.

Dirty Dancing

  • Directors: Emile Ardolino
  • Producers: Linda Gottlieb
  • Writers: Eleanor Bergstein
  • Genres: Drama, Romance
  • Actors: Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach, Cynthia Rhodes

In the summer of 1963, 17-year-old New Yorker Frances “Baby” Houseman (Jennifer Grey) is vacationing with her affluent Jewish family at Kellerman’s[3], a resort in the Catskill Mountains. Baby is planning to attend Mount Holyoke College to study economics and then enter the Peace Corps. She was named after Frances Perkins, the first woman in the U.S. Cabinet. Baby’s father, Jake (Jerry Orbach), is the personal physician of the resort owner Max Kellerman (Jack Weston).

Baby develops a crush on the resort’s dance instructor Johnny Castle (Patrick Swayze), part of the working-class entertainment staff. When Baby, while carrying a watermelon, is invited to one of their parties, she observes for the first time the “dirty dancing” that the staff enjoys. Later, Baby discovers that Johnny’s dance partner Penny Johnson (Cynthia Rhodes) is distraught over being pregnant by Robbie Gould (Max Cantor), the waiter whom Baby’s sister Lisa is dating. When Baby learns that Robbie plans to do nothing about the pregnancy, she secures the money from her father to pay for Penny’s illegal abortion. In her efforts to help, Baby also becomes Penny’s fill-in for a performance at the Sheldrake, a nearby resort where Johnny and Penny perform annually.

In the film’s climactic scene, Johnny, even though he has been fired, returns to the resort to perform the final dance of the season with Baby. Excoriating the Housemans for their choice of Baby’s seat, he utters the film’s most famous line, “Nobody puts Baby in a corner,” as he pulls her up from the family’s table. Dr. Houseman learns that the true culprit in Penny’s pregnancy was Robbie, not Johnny, and he apologizes (Robbie having accidentally confessed to his deed earlier in the scene, while talking to Dr. Houseman). The film ends with a major dance sequence, as Baby overcomes her fears to allow Johnny to lift her high into the air, and the room is transformed into a nightclub where everyone, staff and patrons, dances together.

Powder Blue

  • Directors: Timothy Linh Bui
  • Producers: Timothy Linh Bui, Forest Whitaker, Ross M Dinerstein, Bobby Schwartz, Tracee Stanley Newell
  • Writers: Timothy Linh Bui
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Jessica Biel, Forest Whitaker, Patrick Swayze, Ray Liotta, Eddie Redmayne, Alejandro Romero

Several Los Angeles residents meet on Christmas Eve through chance, tragedy and divine intervention. Patrick Swayze plays the sleazy owner of the strip club where Jessica Biel’s character dances. Eddie Redmayne portrays a mortician who falls in love with her. Kris Kristofferson plays the head of a corporate crime organization who tries to convince his former employee (Ray Liotta) not to seek vengeance on his former co-workers. Forest Whitaker, who also serves as a producer on the film, will play a suicidal ex-priest. Alejandro Romero will play a transsexual prostitute who shares an unexpected bond with the priest.[2]

Ghost

  • Directors: Jerry Zucker
  • Producers: Steven Charles Jaffe, Bruce Joel Rubin, Lauren Ray
  • Writers: Bruce Joel Rubin
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Fantasy, Mystery, Romance, Thriller
  • Actors: Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore, Whoopi Goldberg, Tony Goldwyn, Rick Aviles, Vincent Schiavelli

Sam Wheat (Patrick Swayze) and Molly Jensen (Demi Moore) are a happy and loving couple living in New York City. The only problem in their relationship is Sam’s apparent discomfort with saying “I love you” to his girlfriend, only responding to her saying it with “ditto”. This bothers Molly, who feels she needs to hear him say “I love you” in return.

One night, while walking back to their new apartment after going to the theatre, they encounter a thief named Willy Lopez (Rick Aviles). He pulls a gun and Sam is shot. Sam chases Willy, but loses him; when he returns to Molly, he sees her cradling his own corpse, and realizes that he is now a ghost, trapped between worlds. Lights descend to take him away, but he flees.

Sam realizes that the robbery was planned when Willy sneaks into the house and rifles through his belongings. Sam follows Willy home and learns that his close friend and co-worker, Carl Bruner (Tony Goldwyn), hired Willy to rob Sam in the apparent robbery that went wrong in order to get his office computer password; Carl is involved in a money laundering deal at the bank where he and Sam worked. Sam had recently changed his computer password, locking Carl out of the phony accounts where Carl had stashed the money. Sam lashes out in frustration at his supposed best friend, but realizes that, as a ghost, he can do little.

When Sam returns to Oda Mae and Molly, Molly can hear and see him, as he has assumed a partly visible form. After saying a final goodbye to Oda Mae, he tells Molly he loves her, to which she responds with “ditto”. Sam then walks off into the bright light to heaven, saying “It’s amazing Molly. The love inside, you take it with you. Goodbye, Molly”. Sam then walks to heaven and Molly’s final words are, “See ya..”. the screen then fades to black.

Ghost

  • Directors: Jerry Zucker
  • Producers: Steven Charles Jaffe, Bruce Joel Rubin, Lauren Ray
  • Writers: Bruce Joel Rubin
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Fantasy, Mystery, Romance, Thriller
  • Actors: Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore, Whoopi Goldberg, Tony Goldwyn, Rick Aviles, Vincent Schiavelli

Sam Wheat (Patrick Swayze) and Molly Jensen (Demi Moore) are a happy and loving couple living in New York City. The only problem in their relationship is Sam’s apparent discomfort with saying “I love you” to his girlfriend, only responding to her saying it with “ditto”. This bothers Molly, who feels she needs to hear him say “I love you” in return.

One night, while walking back to their new apartment after going to the theatre, they encounter a thief named Willy Lopez (Rick Aviles). He pulls a gun and Sam is shot. Sam chases Willy, but loses him; when he returns to Molly, he sees her cradling his own corpse, and realizes that he is now a ghost, trapped between worlds. Lights descend to take him away, but he flees.

Sam realizes that the robbery was planned when Willy sneaks into the house and rifles through his belongings. Sam follows Willy home and learns that his close friend and co-worker, Carl Bruner (Tony Goldwyn), hired Willy to rob Sam in the apparent robbery that went wrong in order to get his office computer password; Carl is involved in a money laundering deal at the bank where he and Sam worked. Sam had recently changed his computer password, locking Carl out of the phony accounts where Carl had stashed the money. Sam lashes out in frustration at his supposed best friend, but realizes that, as a ghost, he can do little.

When Sam returns to Oda Mae and Molly, Molly can hear and see him, as he has assumed a partly visible form. After saying a final goodbye to Oda Mae, he tells Molly he loves her, to which she responds with “ditto”. Sam then walks off into the bright light to heaven, saying “It’s amazing Molly. The love inside, you take it with you. Goodbye, Molly”. Sam then walks to heaven and Molly’s final words are, “See ya..”. the screen then fades to black.

Donnie Darko

  • Directors: Richard Kelly
  • Producers: Adam Fields, Nancy Juvonen, Sean McKittrick
  • Writers: Richard Kelly
  • Genres: Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Drew Barrymore, James Duval, Beth Grant, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne, Katharine Ross, Patrick Swayze, Noah Wyle

Donnie Darko (played by Jake Gyllenhaal) is a troubled teenager in suburban Virginia in October 1988. He appears to be suffering the symptoms of paranoid schizophrenia. At the start of the film, he has recently stopped taking his medication. His parents, Rose and Eddie (Mary McDonnell and Holmes Osborne) and his sisters, Elizabeth and Samantha (Maggie Gyllenhaal and Daveigh Chase), are concerned about him. One night at dinner, Donnie and his sister get into a profane argument during which Elizabeth reveals she knows Donnie is no longer taking his medication. Rose confronts Donnie in his bedroom asking him where her little boy has gone and who the stranger is who has taken his place. As she leaves the room, she hears him call her a “bitch” from the other side of the door. Feeling guilty, Donnie resumes taking his medication. On October 2, however, he sleepwalks and meets Frank (James Duval), a man in a menacing bunny costume. Frank tells him that in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds, the world will end. While he is outside, a jet engine mysteriously crashes through the roof of the Darkos’ house, destroying Donnie’s bedroom.

As Eddie drives Donnie to the office of Dr. Thurman (Katharine Ross), Donnie’s therapist, Eddie nearly runs over Roberta Sparrow, also known as “Grandma Death” (Patience Cleveland). A senile old woman who spends her days walking back and forth from her house to the mailbox across the street, Grandma Death whispers in Donnie’s ear that all living things die alone. This greatly troubles Donnie, who worries that life has no meaning.

It is once again October 2. Donnie is in bed, creating a predestination paradox. On this occasion, he chooses to stay in bed, presumably to prevent the harm he caused to several lives in the tangent universe, including Gretchen, the girlfriend he will never meet. Shortly after he goes to sleep, the jet engine from the red eye flight on October 30 crashes through the roof, killing him. In a deleted scene from the director’s cut DVD it is revealed that he was actually impaled by a piece of wood from the broken roof while performing an act of self-gratification, though the removal of this from this film proper makes its canonicity questionable. All the people affected by Donnie’s actions awake as if from a nightmare, having some fragments of memories remaining: Frank, Elizabeth’s boyfriend, subconsciously touches his right eye. Jim Cunningham, perhaps in guilt and remorse for being a pedophile, a hypocrite and phony, awakens crying. As Donnie’s body is taken away, Gretchen, having never met Donnie, rides by the Darkos’ house on her bicycle. She learns from a neighbor boy what has happened and waves to Rose, who is smoking a cigarette. There is an air of mutual recognition between them.