Get Him to the Greek

  • Directors: Nicholas Stoller
  • Producers: Judd Apatow, Nicholas Stoller, David Bushell, Rodney Rothman
  • Writers: Nicholas Stoller, Jason Segel
  • Genres: more
  • Actors: Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss, Rose Byrne, Colm Meaney, Sean Combs

Aaron Green (Jonah Hill) is a driven, idealistic young college graduate who works as an intern at a record company. Aaron is given his big break when he is sent to transport flaky English musician Aldous Snow (Russell Brand) to a concert at Los Angeles’ Greek Theater.

Forgetting Sarah Marshall

  • Directors: Nicholas Stoller
  • Producers: Judd Apatow, Shauna Robertson, Rodney Rothman
  • Writers: Jason Segel
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Romance
  • Actors: Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis, Russell Brand, Bill Hader, Paul Rudd, Liz Cackowski, Jonah Hill

Composer Peter Bretter (Jason Segel) has spent five years adoring his girlfriend, television star Sarah Marshall (Kristen Bell), despite living completely in her shadow. He even works as the composer for Sarah’s CSI-type crime drama, co-starring William Baldwin (as himself), Crime Scene: Scene of the Crime, a job that dramatically underutilizes his talents. One day, Sarah comes to Peter’s place after he’s had a shower to tell him she’s breaking up with him and there’s someone else. Peter tries to talk her out of it and goes as far as to refuse to put his clothes on, but it doesn’t work. Devastated, Peter impulsively starts having sex with random strangers, but he is still unable to overcome his grief. Upon advice from his stepbrother (Bill Hader), he decides to take a trip to Hawaii and stay at a resort Sarah once mentioned; when he goes there, he is confronted by Sarah and her new boyfriend, the articulate and narcissistic (though newly “straight edge” after a stint in rehab) British rocker, Aldous Snow (Russell Brand). The sympathetic receptionist, Rachel Jansen (Mila Kunis) bears witness to the awkward meeting and gives him an expensive suite on the condition that he cleans up after himself.

During the credits, a preview is shown for Sarah Marshall’s new show with Jason Bateman — a detective crime drama similar to her last one, called Animal Instincts, wherein she plays a detective who is also an animal psychic.

Yes Man

  • Directors: Peyton Reed
  • Producers: David Heyman, Richard D Zanuck
  • Writers: Screenplay, Nicholas Stoller, Jarrad Paul, Andrew Mogel, Book, Danny Wallace
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance
  • Actors: Jim Carrey, Terrence Stamp, Zooey Deschanel, Bradley Cooper, Rhys Darby, Danny Masterson

Los Angeles bank employee Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) has become withdrawn and depressed since his divorce from ex-wife Stephanie (Molly Sims). Routinely ignoring his friends, he has grown used to spending his spare time watching DVDs alone in his apartment. His outlook on life has become inherently negative. But when a friend (John Michael Higgins) persuades him to attend the “Yes!” self-improvement seminar, motivational guru Terrence Bundley (Terence Stamp) publicly browbeats him into making a covenant with himself. Carl reluctantly promises to stop being a “No Man” and vows to answer “Yes!” to every opportunity, request or invitation that presents itself thereafter.

After the seminar, saying “yes” to a homeless man’s requests only leaves Carl stranded in Elysian Park with his phone battery dead, no money, and his gas tank empty. Disillusioned, he hikes to a gas station, cursing himself for being so credulous and gullible. But at the gas station he meets Allison (Zooey Deschanel), an eccentric young woman who is refueling her scooter. She gives him a hair-raising ride back to his car, and spontaneously kisses him before she rides off.

After this experience, Carl adopts a positive mentality and seizes every opportunity that comes his way. He takes flying lessons, attends Korean language classes, learns to play the guitar, and even joins a Persian dating website. Saying “yes” constantly works to Carl’s advantage. After accepting concert tickets from a promoter whom he has previously ignored, he sees an idiosyncratic band whose lead singer turns out to be Allison. He is charmed by her quirkiness; she is charmed by his spontaneity; and the two begin dating. He earns a promotion at work after his many approved loans open new territory for the bank in the area of microcredit. Making use of his guitar lessons, he wins public acclaim by playing Third Eye Blind’s song “Jumper” to persuade a man (Luis Guzman) not to commit suicide by jumping off a ledge.

After some credits, a scene shows Carl and Allison on a long stretch of winding highway. Carl has agreed to test the product of one of the people whom he gave a loan. Both are wearing a full body suit with wheels on the elbows, calves, heels, feet, back, and various other stratigically placed body parts, which is what the man invented for better extreme sports. They both “skate” all the way down the highway.