Shooter

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Lorenzo di Bonaventura
  • Writers: Stephen Hunter, Jonathan Lemkin
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Mark Wahlberg, Danny Glover, Ned Beatty, Tate Donovan, Kate Mara, Mike Dopud

Bob Lee Swagger (Mark Wahlberg), a retired Gunnery Sergeant Marine Scout Sniper, is one of the few snipers in the world whose sharpshooting abilities allow him to “take out a target from a mile away.” He reluctantly leaves a self-imposed exile from his isolated mountain home at the request of Colonel Isaac Johnson (Danny Glover). Johnson appeals to his expertise and patriotism to help track down an assassin who plans on shooting the president from a great distance with a high powered rifle. Johnson gives him a list of three cities where the President is scheduled to visit so Swagger could determine if an attempt could be made at any of them.

Swagger assesses each of the locations and determines that a site in Philadelphia would be most conducive to a long range assassination attempt. He passes this information to Johnson, who purportedly arranges for a response. This turns out to be a set-up: while Swagger is working with Johnson’s agents — including a local police officer — to find the rumored assassin, the Ethiopian archbishop is instead assassinated while standing next to the president. Swagger is shot by the officer, but manages to escape. The agents tell the police and public that Swagger is the shooter, and stage a massive manhunt for the injured sniper. However, Swagger has a stroke of luck — he meets a rookie FBI special agent, Nick Memphis (Michael Peña), disarms him and steals his car.

Later appearing in a closed meeting with the Director of the FBI and the United States Attorney General present, Swagger clears his name by loading a rifle round (supplied by Memphis) into his rifle (which is there as evidence since it was supposedly used in the killing), aiming it at the Colonel and pulling the trigger — which fails to fire the round. Swagger explains that every time he leaves his house, he takes out all the firing pins replacing them with slightly shorter ones, thus rendering them unable to fire until he returns. Although Swagger is exonerated, Colonel Johnson takes advantage of a legal loophole — the Ethiopian genocide is outside American legal jurisdiction — and walks free. The attorney general approaches Swagger and states that as a law enforcement official, he must abide by the law (he insinuates that if it was the “wild west” it would be appropriate to clean the system with a gun). Afterwards, the Colonel and the Senator plan their next move while at the Senator’s vacation house — only to be interrupted by an attack by Swagger. He kills both conspirators, one of the Colonel’s aides and two bodyguards, then breaks open a gas valve before leaving. The fire in the fireplace ignites the gas, blowing up the house. The final scene shows Swagger getting into a car with Fenn and driving away.

Toy Story 3

  • Directors: Lee Unkrich
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter
  • Writers: Screenplay, Michael Arndt, Treatment, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, John Ratzenberger, Wallace Shawn, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, Ned Beatty, Michael Keaton, Jodi Benson, Blake Clark, Timothy Dalton, John Morris, Laurie Metcalf, Bonnie Hunt, Jeff Garlin, Whoopi Goldberg, Kristen Schaal

Andy is departing for college, and his toys, including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz and (Tim Allen), are going to be put in the attic. Before they can be put in the attic, they are accidentally thrown away and are picked up by the garbage men. The toys find themselves at a local day-care center, where they must try to survive the playful but careless pre-school children. Woody attempts to save his friends and find themselves a new home, but matters are further complicated when Buzz is damaged during an escape attempt. The toys try to reset Buzz, but end up causing him to revert to a Spanish version of his delusions of being a space ranger, much to Jessie’s delight and the other toys’ discomfort.[2][3]

Deliverance

  • Directors: John Boorman
  • Producers: John Boorman
  • Writers: Novel, James Dickey, Screenplay, James Dickey, Uncredited, John Boorman
  • Genres: Adventure, Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox, James Dickey

Four Atlanta businessmen â€“ Lewis (Reynolds), Ed (Voight), Bobby (Beatty), and Drew (Cox) â€“ decide to canoe down the fictional Cahulawassee River in the remote Georgia wilderness, expecting to have fun and see the glory of nature before the river valley is flooded over by the upcoming construction of a dam and lake. Lewis, an experienced outdoorsman, is the de facto leader. Ed is also a veteran of several trips but lacks Lewis’ machismo. Bobby and Drew are novices.

From the start, it is clear the four are far from what they know as civilization. The locals are crude and unimpressed with the presence of outsiders, and the film implies some of them are inbred. Drew briefly connects with a local banjo-playing boy by joining him in an impromptu bluegrass jam. But when the song ends, the boy turns away without saying anything, refusing Drew’s handshake. The four “city boys”, as they are called by one of the locals, exhibit a slightly condescending attitude towards the locals (Bobby in particular is patronizing).

Traveling in pairs on the river, the foursome’s two canoes are briefly separated. Pausing briefly to get their bearings, Bobby and Ed encounter a pair of unkempt hillbillies (Bill McKinney and Herbert ‘Cowboy’ Coward) emerging from the woods, one wielding a loaded shotgun. After a stray comment about a moonshine still offends the hillbillies, Bobby is forced at gunpoint to strip naked. McKinney’s character chases after and physically harasses Bobby as he tries to escape. His ear is twisted to bring him to his hands and knees, and he is then ordered to “squeal like a pig” as McKinney’s character proceeds to rape him. Ed is bound to a tree with his own belt, helpless as McKinney’s character violently sodomizes Bobby.

When they finally reach their destination, the town of Aintry (which will soon be submerged by the dammed river, and is being evacuated), they take the injured Lewis to the hospital while the Sheriff comes to investigate the incident. True to Lewis’s predictions, one of the deputies is related to the deceased hillbillies, and is highly suspicious. The three carefully concoct a cover story for the authorities about Drew’s death and disappearance being an accident, lying about their ordeal to Sheriff Bullard (played by author James Dickey) in order to escape a possible double murder charge. The sheriff clearly doesn’t believe them, but seems to have figured out what actually happened. After thinking it over, he simply tells the men: “I don’t ever wanna see you around here again… I’d kinda like to see this town die peaceful.” The three readily agree. The three vow to keep their story a secret for the rest of their lives, which proves to be psychologically burdensome for Ed: in the final scene, Ed awakes screaming from a nightmare in which a dead man’s hand rises from the lake.

Rudy

  • Directors: David Anspaugh
  • Producers: Cary Woods
  • Writers: Angelo Pizzo
  • Genres: Biography, Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Sean Astin, Jon Favreau, Ned Beatty, Charles S Dutton, Jason Miller, Vince Vaughn

Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger grew up dreaming of playing football at the University of Notre Dame. While achieving some success with his local high school football team, Ruettiger lacks the grades and money to attend Notre Dame, and talent and physical size (the real Ruettiger was only 5’6″ and the film suggests that the fictional Rudy was even smaller than that) to play football for the Fighting Irish. Instead, he takes a job at the local steel mill where his father Daniel Ruettiger Sr. (a huge Notre Dame fan) works, and he prepares to settle down.

When his best friend Pete is killed in an explosion at the mill, Rudy decides to follow his dream of attending Notre Dame and playing college football for the Fighting Irish, and leaves for Notre Dame, against his father’s warning that “Ruettigers don’t belong at college.” Ruettiger fails to get admitted to Notre Dame, and instead goes to a small junior college, Holy Cross College, hoping to qualify for a transfer to the university.

During his final semester of eligibility transfer, he is granted admission to Notre Dame. After “walking on” (a term used to designate the process by which non-scholarship players join a college football team) for the football team, Ruettiger convinces coach Ara Parseghian to give him a spot on the football practice or scout team, where Rudy exhibits more drive and desire than some of his big-name varsity teammates.

The final game of the season comes, against Georgia Tech. And while Rudy is suited up, his teammates feel this is not enough. One of the varsity players starts a chant that soon goes stadium wide. Coach Devine eventually gives in and lets Rudy play on the final kickoff. Rudy then stays in for the final play of the game and sacks the opposing quarterback. The final scene depicts him being carried off the field by his teammates.

Charlie Wilson s War

  • Directors: Mike Nichols
  • Producers: Tom Hanks
  • Writers: George Crile, Aaron Sorkin
  • Genres: Biography, Drama
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, Ned Beatty, Om Puri

The film shows Wilson having a very gregarious social life of women and partying, including having his congressional office staffed with young, attractive women. The film also shows how the partying causes a federal investigation into allegations of cocaine use by Wilson, conducted by then-federal prosecutor Rudy Giuliani as part of a larger investigation into congressional misconduct. The investigation results in no charge against Wilson.

A friend and romantic interest, Joanne Herring, encourages Wilson to do more to help the Afghans, and persuades Wilson to visit the Pakistani leadership. The Pakistanis complain about the inadequate support of the U.S. to oppose the Soviets, and they insist that Wilson visit a major Pakistan-based Afghan refugee camp. Deeply moved by their misery and determination to fight, Wilson is frustrated by the regional CIA personnel’s insistence on a low key approach against the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan. Wilson returns home to lead an effort to substantially increase funding to the mujahideen.

As part of this effort, Wilson befriends the maverick CIA operative Gust Avrakotos and his understaffed Afghanistan group to find a better strategy, especially including a means to counter the Soviets’ formidable Mi-24 helicopter gunship. This group was composed in part of members of the CIA’s elite Special Activities Division, including a young paramilitary officer named Michael Vickers. As a result, Wilson’s deft political bargaining for the necessary funding and Avrakotos’ group’s careful planning using those resources, such as supplying the guerrillas with FIM-92 Stinger missile launchers, turns the Soviet occupation into a deadly quagmire with their heavy fighting vehicles being destroyed at a crippling rate. The CIA’s anti-communism budget evolves from $5 million to over $500 million (with the same amount matched by Saudi Arabia), startling several congressmen. This effort by Wilson ultimately evolves into a major portion of the U.S. foreign policy known as the Reagan Doctrine, under which the U.S. expanded assistance beyond just the mujahideen and began also supporting other anti-communist resistance movements around the world.

Wilson follows Avrakotos’ guidance to seek support for post-Soviet occupation Afghanistan, but finds almost no enthusiasm in the U.S. government for even the modest measures he proposes. The film ends with Wilson receiving a major commendation for the support of the U.S. clandestine services, but his pride is tempered by his fears of what unintended consequences his secret efforts could yield in the future and the implications of U.S. disengagement from Afghanistan.

Superman II

  • Directors: Richard Lester, Richard Donner
  • Producers: Pierre Spengler
  • Writers: Screenplay, Mario Puzo, David Newman, Leslie Newman, Creative Consultant, Tom Mankiewicz, Story, Mario Puzo, Comic Book, Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster
  • Genres: Adventure, Romance, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Ned Beatty, Jackie Cooper, Sarah Douglas, Margot Kidder, Jack O Halloran, Valerie Perrine, Susannah York, Clifton James, E G Marshall, Marc McClure, Terence Stamp

Prior to the destruction of Krypton, the criminals General Zod, Ursa and Non are banished into the Phantom Zone. The Zone travels through the galaxy and nears Earth, where it is caught in the explosion of a hydrogen bomb that Superman threw into space in order to save the Eiffel Tower and Paris; the explosion causes the Zone to shatter and free the three Kryptonians, who find they have super powers due to the yellow light of Earth’s sun. They discover human astronauts on the moon, and mistakenly believe that the center of Earth’s power is in Houston, Texas, traveling there to claim the planet for themselves. After destroying much of the town of East Houston, Idaho and defacing the presidential faces on Mount Rushmore, they travel to the White House and force the United States President to surrender to General Zod; though the President does so, he also warns Zod that Superman will defeat them, causing Zod to demand via national broadcast that Superman kneel before him.

Meanwhile, Clark Kent and Lois Lane are sent on assignment for the Daily Planet to Niagara Falls. After Superman saves a boy carelessly playing on the rails, Lois decides that Clark is Superman and intentionally puts herself in danger by going into the water. Clark does not become Superman, but cuts a log secretly with his heat vision, and helps her escape that way. She feels disgusted. As they return to the hotel, she insists on cleaning up and requests something to restore her hair. Clark picks it up, trips, and burns his hands in the fireplace before her very eyes. At least, he should have. Scrambling to help him, she notices no damage and realizes she was right all along. With his secret revealed, Superman decides to take Lois to his Fortress of Solitude. There, he shows her the traces of his past stored in energy crystals, one of which Lois misplaces under her purse. Superman decides to undergo the irreversible process of becoming a human to be able to love Lois. After his transformation, the two spend the night together and then return to Metropolis. They discover what Zod and his companions have done, including Zod’s demand to Superman, and Clark realizes he must return to the Fortress to try to restore his powers, and begins the long trip alone. Once there, he discovers the crystal that Lois had misplaced, and uses its power to restore his abilities.

In the Fortress, Superman attempts to subdue Zod and the others, but is unable to. Under the threat of harming Lois, Zod forces Superman to become human again. Superman appears to undergo the transformation process, but when he emerges, Zod, Ursa, and Non realize they have been the ones transformed into humans, as Superman was able to reconfigure the process before they arrived. Lois is able to break free, and she and Superman quickly cause the three to fall into the depths of the Fortress to their doom. Lex tries to assure Superman that he was in on this plan, but Superman returns him to the authorities. After Superman helps to restore the damage Zod wrought, he still finds that Lois knows his secret. It’s also tearing her up inside. Superman kisses Lois, using his telepathic abilities to erase her memory of the past few days to keep his secret safe, and take her grief away. Superman restores the American flag atop the White House, assuring the President that he will never again abandon his duty.

Network

  • Directors: Sidney Lumet
  • Producers: Howard Gottfried
  • Writers: Paddy Chayefsky
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Peter Finch, Robert Duvall, Ned Beatty, Beatrice Straight

The story opens with long-time “UBS Evening News” anchor Howard Beale (Peter Finch) being fired because of the show’s low ratings. He has two more weeks on the air, but the following night, Beale announces on live television that he will commit suicide by shooting himself in the head during an upcoming live broadcast.[2]

UBS immediately fires him after this incident, but they let him back on the air, ostensibly for a dignified farewell, with persuasion from Beale’s best friend and president of the News division, Max Schumacher (William Holden), the network’s old guard news editor. Beale promises that he will apologize for his outburst, but instead rants about how life is “bullshit,” which he utters repeatedly. While there are serious repercussions, the program’s ratings soar and, much to Schumacher’s dismay, the upper echelons of UBS decide to exploit Beale’s antics rather than pulling him off the air.

In one impassioned diatribe, Beale galvanizes the nation with his rant, “I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!” and persuades Americans to shout out their windows during a spectacular lightning storm. Soon Beale is hosting a new program called The Howard Beale Show, top-billed as a “mad prophet of the airways.” Ultimately, the show becomes the highest rated (Duvall’s character calls it “a big, fat-assed, big-titted hit!”) program on television, and Beale finds new celebrity preaching his angry message in front of a live audience that, on cue, repeats the Beale’s marketed catchphrase en masse. His new set is lit by blue spotlights and an enormous stained-glass window, supplemented with segments featuring astrology, gossip, opinion polls, and yellow journalism.

The movie ends with Beale being shot to death on live television. As the narrator states that Beale was the first man ever murdered because of bad ratings, an array of televisions play newscasts reporting the incident matter-of-factly, intermixed with the noise of commercials.