Sex and the City 2

  • Directors: Michael Patrick King
  • Producers: Michael Patrick King, Sarah Jessica Parker, Darren Star, John Melfi
  • Writers: Characters, Darren Star, Screenplay, Michael Patrick King
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon, Chris Noth, John Corbett, David Eigenberg, Evan Handler, Jason Lewis, Lynn Cohen, Raza Jaffrey, Liza Minnelli, Miley Cyrus

The story begins with a flashback to how Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker) first meets Samantha (Kim Cattrall), Charlotte (Kristin Davis), and Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) in the heyday of Studio 54. The movie then jumps to the present, two years after the events of the first film. At the Connecticut same-sex wedding of Stanford Blatch (Willie Garson) and Anthony Marentino (Mario Cantone), Liza Minnelli appears in a cameo and sings Beyonce’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)”.

The four friends now have lives that are more stressful than before: All are married except for Samantha, who is now 52 and trying to keep her libido alive while dealing with menopause; Charlotte’s two children are a handful; and Carrie’s marriage to Mr. Big (Chris Noth) has settled down, though they differ on how to spend their spare time: she always wants to go out, he would prefer to stay home and watch television some evenings.[2][3][4]

Meanwhile, Samantha is approached by an Arab sheikh to devise a PR campaign for his business, and he offers to fly her and her friends on an all-expenses-paid luxury vacation to Abu Dhabi. While in Abu Dhabi, Carrie runs into her former lover, Aidan (John Corbett), and agrees to a dinner date. In a moment of passion, the two kiss. Carrie deals with the question of whether or not to tell Big.

Meanwhile, Samantha, Charlotte, and Miranda run up against a culture clash in the Middle East, as their style and attitudes contrast with Muslim society. This clash, and comedy derived from their defiance, makes for “comic relief.”[2] The sheik stops paying the bills and they have to return prematurely.

Cabaret

  • Directors: Bob Fosse
  • Producers: Cy Feuer
  • Writers: Christopher Isherwood, John Van Druten, Joe Masteroff, Jay Allen
  • Genres: Drama, Musical, Romance
  • Actors: Liza Minnelli, Michael York, Joel Grey

Film Programmer Joanna Ney says in discussing the film. “The musical numbers are, in fact, the essence of the film and inform the narrative.”

In early 1930s Berlin, American singer Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) performs at the Kit Kat Klub. A new arrival in the city, Brian Roberts (Michael York), moves into Sally’s apartment building. A reserved English academic and writer, Brian gives English lessons to earn a living while completing his German studies. Sally unsuccessfully tries to seduce Brian and suspects he may be gay (Christopher Isherwood, on whose semi-autobiographical book the film is indirectly based, was gay and reportedly “went to Berlin in search of boys to love”).

Brian tells Sally that on three previous occasions he has tried to have romantic relationships with women, all of which have failed. The unlikely pair become friends, and Brian is witness to Sally’s anarchic, bohemian life in the last days of the German Weimar Republic. Later in the film, Sally and Brian become lovers despite their earlier reservations, and Brian and Sally conclude with irony that his previous failures with women were because they were “the wrong three girls.”

Sally befriends Maximilian von Heune, a rich playboy baron who takes her and Brian to his country estate. It becomes ambiguous which of the duo Max is seducing, epitomized by a scene in which the three dance intimately together in a wine-induced reverie. Max eventually loses interest in the two, and leaves them back in Berlin. When Sally triumphantly tells Brian that she slept with Max, Brian begins to laugh and reveals that he slept with Max as well. After the ensuing argument, Brian storms off and picks a fight with a group of Nazis, who beat him senseless. Brian and Sally make up in their rooming house, where Sally reveals that Max left them an envelope of money.

Although the songs throughout the film allude to and advance the narrative, every song except “Tomorrow Belongs To Me” is executed in the context of a Kit Kat Klub performance.