Toy Story 3

  • Directors: Lee Unkrich
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter
  • Writers: Screenplay, Michael Arndt, Treatment, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, John Ratzenberger, Wallace Shawn, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, Ned Beatty, Michael Keaton, Jodi Benson, Blake Clark, Timothy Dalton, John Morris, Laurie Metcalf, Bonnie Hunt, Jeff Garlin, Whoopi Goldberg, Kristen Schaal

Andy is departing for college, and his toys, including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz and (Tim Allen), are going to be put in the attic. Before they can be put in the attic, they are accidentally thrown away and are picked up by the garbage men. The toys find themselves at a local day-care center, where they must try to survive the playful but careless pre-school children. Woody attempts to save his friends and find themselves a new home, but matters are further complicated when Buzz is damaged during an escape attempt. The toys try to reset Buzz, but end up causing him to revert to a Spanish version of his delusions of being a space ranger, much to Jessie’s delight and the other toys’ discomfort.[2][3]

Toy Story 2

  • Directors: John Lasseter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, Ash Brannon
  • Producers: Karen Robert Jackson, Helene Plotkin, Executive Producer, Sarah McArthur
  • Writers: Story, John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Ash Brannon, Andrew Stanton, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Rita Hsiao, Doug Chamberlain, Chris Webb, Story Supervisor, Dan Jeup, Joe Ranft
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Kelsey Grammer, Don Rickles, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Wayne Knight

Set a year after Toy Story (1995), Andy accidentally tears Woody’s arm while playing with him before leaving for cowboy camp (an annual trip he makes with Woody), leaving Woody on the shelf. Woody starts to have nightmares of becoming a disused toy, but wakes to find that Wheezy, a penguin toy that lost its squeaker, is being taken by Andy’s mother to be sold at a yard sale. Woody rescues Wheezy with the help of Andy’s dog Buster (who was mentioned at the end of the previous film as a puppy), but he is accidentally left behind at the yard sale and subsequently stolen by toy store owner Al McWhiggin. Buzz Lightyear and the other toys watch in horror, and Buzz sets up a rescue party with Mr. Potato Head, Rex, Slinky Dog and Hamm to bring Woody back.

Woody is brought to Al’s apartment, where he discovers that he is a toy created from Woody’s Roundup, a popular children’s television show from the 1950s. By acquiring him, Al now has a complete collection of the show’s merchandise, which he plans to sell to a toy museum in Japan. Woody meets the toy versions of the show’s co-stars: his sidekick Jessie, his horse Bullseye, and an old prospector named Stinky Pete formerly known as ‘The Prospector’ (who is still in his original box). These three are excited to be going to Japan. But knowing that he is Andy’s toy, Woody has doubts and tries to escape the apartment but without success. Later, Al brings over a toy repairman, who restores Woody’s arm and gives him a fresh paint job, which Woody appreciates. He slowly warms up to the idea of going to Japan, particularly after learning that Jessie was once the favorite toy of a little girl named Emily who gave her away after growing up and he realises that, if he returns to Andy, he will eventually be thrown away when he grows up, whereas if he goes to Japan, he will be remembered and treasured forever.

The toys happily return home and soon learn that, due to Al’s failure to sell the merchandise collection, his business and his mood have both declined sharply. When Andy comes home from camp, he is excited to see the new additions to his own collection, Jessie and Bullseye, believing that his mom got them for him while he was away. He repairs Woody’s arm and marks both of the others with his name, making them feel appreciated again. Buzz shows signs of attraction to Jessie after she performs a similar stunt that Buzz did in the 1st movie (his wings inadvertently extend in astonishment). Woody and Buzz now accept the fact that Andy will eventually grow up, but even after he does, they will still be there for each other. As the movie ends, a now-fixed Wheezy sings “You’ve Got a Friend in Me.”

Monsters Inc

  • Directors: Peter Docter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, David Silverman
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Associate Producer, Kori Rae
  • Writers: Story, Jill Culton, Peter Docter, Ralph Eggleston, Jeff Pidgeon, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson, Additional Screenplay, Robert L Baird, Rhett Reese, Jonathan Roberts
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: John Goodman, Billy Crystal, Steve Buscemi, James Coburn, Jennifer Tilly

Monsters, Inc. is the city of Monstropolis’ power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its many monster employees, skilled in scare techniques, to human children’s bedrooms around the world at their local bedtime to scare them, through individually-loaded and activated teleportation doors set up on the “scare floor”, each of which precisely matches a closet door in the individual child’s bedroom. The screams of the suddenly-awakened tots, captured through the portals, generate electric power for the monster world. It is understood, however, that the children themselves are toxic, and the company goes to great lengths to prevent contact with them; should a monster be touched by a child, or simply their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is immediately alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it increasingly difficult to harvest enough scream to meet the power demands of Monstropolis, as their energy crisis looms.

One evening, James P. Sullivan (“Sulley”), Monsters, Inc.’s top scarer, finds a loaded door on the scare floor after hours – in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child’s room appears empty, but Sulley finds to his horror that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-scarer, emerges from the child’s room and surreptitiously returns her door to an unseen door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of his work-partner and pal Mike Wazowski, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley’s home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to unusually high levels. Sulley nicknames the child “Boo” and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.

Near the end of the credits, it humorously states: “No monsters were used in the making of this film.”