Nanny McPhee

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Lindsay Doran, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner
  • Writers: Screenplay, Emma Thompson, Books, Christianna Brand
  • Genres: Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Emma Thompson, Colin Firth, Angela Lansbury, Imelda Staunton, Kelly Macdonald, Thomas Sangster, Eliza Bennett, Jennifer Rae Daykin, Holly Gibbs

Taking place in 19th century England, widower and undertaker 41-year-old Cedric Brown (Colin Firth) has seven children: 12-year-old Simon (Thomas Sangster), 10-year-old Tora (Eliza Bennett), 9-year-old Lily (Jennifer Rae Daykin), 8-year-old Eric (Raphaël Coleman), 7-year-old Sebastian (Samuel Honywood ), 5-year-old Christianna (Holly Gibbs) and 1-year-old Aggie (Hebe Barnes and Zinnia Barnes). He loves his children very much, but spends little time with them, unable to handle raising them all on his own. The children have had a series of seventeen nannies, whom they systematically drive out; it is a point of pride for them to get rid of each nanny as fast as possible. They also terrorize the cook, Mrs. Blatherwick (Imelda Staunton) but are cared for and loved by Evangeline (Kelly Macdonald), the young scullery maid.

Cedric attempts to hire another nanny from the agency that sent the past seventeen nannies, but the agency refuses him, as the children have sent the past nannies away, terrorized. Desperate to find another nanny, Cedric heeds the advice of a mysterious voice from the house, which says, “the person you need is Nanny McPhee.” After a series of mysterious events, an unusual and hideous woman named Nanny McPhee (Emma Thompson) arrives at Brown home, introducing herself as a “government nanny”. With discipline and magic, she transforms the family’s lives. In the process, she herself transforms from ugly to beautiful. The children, led by Simon, attempt to play their tricks on her, but gradually start to respect her and ask her for advice. They change into responsible people, helping their hapless father in solving the family problems, and making Nanny McPhee less and less needed. (The storyline is, at this point, very similar to Mary Poppins).

Interestingly, not all of the lessons are for the children. In addition, the last one can vary depending on interpretation.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines made out of glue and macaroni (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.