Liar Liar

  • Directors: Tom Shadyac
  • Producers: Brian Grazer
  • Writers: Paul Guay, Stephen Mazur
  • Genres: Comedy, Fantasy
  • Actors: Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney, Justin Cooper, Jennifer Tilly, Anne Haney, Swoosie Kurtz, Cary Elwes, Amanda Donohoe

Fletcher Reede (Jim Carrey) is a particularly career-focused lawyer and divorced father. He has a habit of giving precedence to his job, breaking promises to his young son Max, and then lying to both Max (Justin Cooper) and his ex-wife Audrey (Maura Tierney) about the real reason for having done so. Ultimately, Fletcher misses his son’s birthday party because he is having sex with his partner Miranda (Amanda Donohoe), and Max wishes while blowing out his cake candles that his father couldn’t tell a lie for an entire day, a wish that immediately becomes true.

Fletcher soon discovers, through a series of embarrassing incidents—such as when he tells Miranda that he has “had better” just after having sex with her—that he is unable to lie or even withhold a true answer. These incidents are inconvenient, as he is fighting a divorce case in court which, should he win, could be a huge boost to his career. His client is Samantha Cole (Jennifer Tilly). His main witness is willing to commit perjury to win, but Fletcher discovers that he cannot even ask a question if he knows the answer will be a lie; during the case he even objects to himself when he tries to lie to get the desired information. Meanwhile, Audrey is threatening to move to Boston with her new boyfriend Jerry (Cary Elwes) and to take Max with them.

The premise of Liar Liar, that of a protagonist who must tell the truth for the next 24 hours, can also be found in the Bob Hope movie Nothing But the Truth (1941 film).

The Haunted Mansion

  • Directors: Rob Minkoff
  • Producers: Andrew Gunn, Don Hahn
  • Writers: David Berenbaum
  • Genres: Comedy, Family, Fantasy, Horror, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Eddie Murphy, Jennifer Tilly, Terence Stamp, Marsha Thomason, Nathaniel Parker

Jim and Sara Evers are proprietors of Evers and Evers Real Estate and parents of 10-year-old Michael and 13-year-old Megan. Jim is a workaholic who has not been spending time with his family, much to the disapproval of his wife. On a weekend trip in which he has promised to devote time to the family, they make a detour through the swamps of New Orleans, Louisiana to Gracey Manor, a decaying but valuable property. The owners had earlier contacted Sara with interest in selling,but they end up seeing ghosts at the house.

Once the Evers arrive, a violent rainstorm erupts, and they are led inside by Ramsley, the creepy butler who is immediately disturbed that Sara did not come alone. The family is introduced to Master Edward Gracey, the heir of the house, and invited to stay the night as the roads have flooded. Michael and Megan are sent to one bedroom, Jim and Sara to another.

As Jim and Sara are separated, and Jim finds himself trapped in a secret passage, Michael and Megan are led by a floating blue orb into an attic room where they discover an antiquated painting that looks exactly like their mother. They encounter Ezra and Emma, a footman and maid respectively who work for the mansion and also warn the kids of impending danger. Megan and Michael discover that Emma and Ezra are actually ghosts, as is Master Gracey, and that Master Gracey thinks their mother is his lover Elizabeth returned to him from beyond the grave; years ago, she had seemingly committed suicide.

Jim has learned an important lesson about family, and his son and daughter have learned bravery in the face of evil. The family, now in possession of the deed to the house, head out on their vacation to the lake (with the encased head of Madame Leota in the back seat and a quartet of singing busts strapped to the back of the car singing their own version of “When the Saints Come Marching In”).

Monsters Inc

  • Directors: Peter Docter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, David Silverman
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Associate Producer, Kori Rae
  • Writers: Story, Jill Culton, Peter Docter, Ralph Eggleston, Jeff Pidgeon, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson, Additional Screenplay, Robert L Baird, Rhett Reese, Jonathan Roberts
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: John Goodman, Billy Crystal, Steve Buscemi, James Coburn, Jennifer Tilly

Monsters, Inc. is the city of Monstropolis’ power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its many monster employees, skilled in scare techniques, to human children’s bedrooms around the world at their local bedtime to scare them, through individually-loaded and activated teleportation doors set up on the “scare floor”, each of which precisely matches a closet door in the individual child’s bedroom. The screams of the suddenly-awakened tots, captured through the portals, generate electric power for the monster world. It is understood, however, that the children themselves are toxic, and the company goes to great lengths to prevent contact with them; should a monster be touched by a child, or simply their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is immediately alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it increasingly difficult to harvest enough scream to meet the power demands of Monstropolis, as their energy crisis looms.

One evening, James P. Sullivan (“Sulley”), Monsters, Inc.’s top scarer, finds a loaded door on the scare floor after hours – in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child’s room appears empty, but Sulley finds to his horror that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-scarer, emerges from the child’s room and surreptitiously returns her door to an unseen door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of his work-partner and pal Mike Wazowski, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley’s home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to unusually high levels. Sulley nicknames the child “Boo” and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.

Near the end of the credits, it humorously states: “No monsters were used in the making of this film.”