The Magnificent Seven

  • Directors: John Sturges
  • Producers: John Sturges
  • Writers: William Roberts, Walter Newman, Walter Bernstein
  • Genres: Western, Adventure, Drama
  • Actors: Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, James Coburn, Horst Buchholz, Brad Dexter

A Mexican village is periodically raided by bandits led by Calvera (Eli Wallach). As he and his men ride away from their latest visit, Calvera promises to return.

Desperate, the village leaders travel to a border town to buy guns to defend themselves. They approach a veteran gunslinger, Chris (Yul Brynner). He tells them guns alone will not do them any good; they are farmers, not fighters. They ask him to lead them, but Chris rejects them, telling them a single man is not enough. They keep at him though, and he eventually gives in. He recruits men, though the pay is a pittance.

First to answer the call is the hotheaded, inexperienced Chico (Horst Buchholz), but he is rejected. Harry Luck (Brad Dexter), an old friend of Chris, joins because he believes Chris is looking for treasure. Vin (Steve McQueen) signs on after going broke from gambling. Other recruits include Bernardo O’Reilly (Charles Bronson) (who is also broke), Britt (James Coburn), fast and deadly with his switchblade, and Lee (Robert Vaughn), who is on the run and needs someplace to lie low until things cool down. Chico trails the group as they ride south, and is eventually allowed to join them.

As the three survivors leave, Chico decides to stay with Petra. Chris and Vin ride away, pausing briefly at the graves of their fallen comrades. Chris observes, “Only the farmers won. We lost. We always lose.”

Eraser

  • Directors: Chuck Russell
  • Producers: Anne Kopelson, Arnold Kopelson
  • Writers: Tony Puryear, Walon Green, Michael S Chernuchin
  • Genres: Action, Drama, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Caan, Vanessa Williams, James Coburn, and Robert Pastorelli, James Cromwell, Danny Nucci, Andy Romano, Nick Chinlund, Gerry Becker

John “Eraser” Kruger (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is a U.S. Marshal who works for the Federal Witness Security Protection Program (WITSEC). John is assigned to protect Dr. Lee Cullen (Vanessa L. Williams), a scientist who works for Cyrez Corporation, a company that creates and manufactures weapons for the military. Lee has come across plans in which Cyrez plans to sell a top secret electronic pulse rifle to terrorist Sergei Ivanovich Petrofsky (Olek Krupa). With its unparalleled firepower, the sale of such weapons to the wrong hands would tip over the balance of power.

The man behind the scheme, William Donahue (James Cromwell) wants Lee dead, because without Lee’s testimony, there is no case against Cyrez. After Donahue commits suicide to escape punishment, John takes Lee to New York City to hide her, then John and his mentor, fellow marshal Robert Deguerin (James Caan), try to locate a witness. But Deguerin kills the witness they are looking for, indicating that Deguerin is Donahue’s U.S. Marshal mole in the scam. Even Undersecretary of Defense Daniel Harper (Andy Romano) is in on it.

Deguerin kidnaps Lee, and with the help of Johnny Casteleone (Robert Pastorelli), a man whose life John once saved, John rescues Lee and prevents the railgun shipment. After a hearing for Deguerin and his fellow conspirators a few weeks later, and with the implication that under civil law jurisdiction a conviction and sentence of the culprits will not be possible, John eliminates Deguerin and the conspirators, “erasing” them thoroughly in an arranged train accident.

The Nutty Professor

  • Directors: Tom Shadyac
  • Producers: Karen Kehela, Jerry Lewis, Mark Lipsky, Russell Simmons, Brian Grazer
  • Writers: David Sheffield, Barry W Blaustein, Tom Shadyac, Steve Oedekerk
  • Genres: Comedy, Fantasy, Romance, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Eddie Murphy, Jada Pinkett Smith, James Coburn, Larry Miller, Dave Chappelle, John Ales

Lance Perkins (Murphy) is hosting an exercise program on TV for overweight people. Professor Sherman Klump (also Murphy) gets ready for school. Meanwhile, hamsters are overrunning Wellman College and causing general chaos. It turns out that these are the school’s laboratory hamsters that 400-pound Sherman accidentally released the night before. The problem contained, Sherman is given an update by his assistant Jason (Ales) about their latest project – an experimental formula that reconstructs the DNA of an obese person to make weight loss easy. It seems that their fattest hamster, Shelley, has lost 3 ounces, proving that the serum works. Jason suggests increasing the amount Shelley is fed, but the ever-kindly Sherman argues against it, saying it could be dangerous.

He then has an unpleasant meeting with Dean Richmond (Miller). The Dean tells him that the incident with the hamsters has cost the science department most of its funding. Harlan Hartley (Coburn) is the school’s last remaining wealthy alumnus and is planning to award a $10 million grant to the college, and Klump is warned not to alienate him as well.

After class, Sherman meets the lovely Miss Carla Purty (Pinkett), a chemistry grad student teaching a class across the hall who is a big fan of his work, and falls instantly in love with her. Later that night, Sherman dines with his portly family (most of whom are also played by Murphy), and argues with them about obesity. Cletus, his carnivorous father, starts his habit of farting randomly. Treating this disgraceful procedure religiously, he breaks wind to the point where he has soiled himself (6 times). Sherman is hurt by the comments his father, Cletus, makes, but Sherman’s mother, Anna, tells him that he is “beautiful inside and out”, prompting Sherman to attempt to ask Carla out on a date, which she accepts.

As Buddy stands poised to return a blow, Sherman starts to “fight” him for control of his body: fat and thin body parts- beginning with his right fist and subsequently varying around the rest of his body- alternate with increasing speed while Buddy’s voice shouts “You can’t beat me!” and Sherman’s voice replies “Yes I can!”. Eventually, after a violent transformation/confrontation, Sherman wins the struggle. Still on stage, he tells the awed alumni that , while he started out wanting to help people, what he did was selfish and foolish, and that he has learned that the important thing is to accept himself as he is, rather than being unhappy about how much he weighs. He leaves, but Carla stops him and asks why did he lie. He explains that he did not believe that she would accept him and she assures him that it doesn’t matter if he is overweight or not. Carla asks him to dance and he agrees yes, Jason subsequently arriving with a tuxedo that fits. The two subsequently dance for the rest of the night, much to the approval of Jason and Sherman’s family. Harley then tells the Dean that he’s decided to give Sherman the grant because he’s “a brilliant scientist, and a gentleman.”

Monsters Inc

  • Directors: Peter Docter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, David Silverman
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Associate Producer, Kori Rae
  • Writers: Story, Jill Culton, Peter Docter, Ralph Eggleston, Jeff Pidgeon, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson, Additional Screenplay, Robert L Baird, Rhett Reese, Jonathan Roberts
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: John Goodman, Billy Crystal, Steve Buscemi, James Coburn, Jennifer Tilly

Monsters, Inc. is the city of Monstropolis’ power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its many monster employees, skilled in scare techniques, to human children’s bedrooms around the world at their local bedtime to scare them, through individually-loaded and activated teleportation doors set up on the “scare floor”, each of which precisely matches a closet door in the individual child’s bedroom. The screams of the suddenly-awakened tots, captured through the portals, generate electric power for the monster world. It is understood, however, that the children themselves are toxic, and the company goes to great lengths to prevent contact with them; should a monster be touched by a child, or simply their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is immediately alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it increasingly difficult to harvest enough scream to meet the power demands of Monstropolis, as their energy crisis looms.

One evening, James P. Sullivan (“Sulley”), Monsters, Inc.’s top scarer, finds a loaded door on the scare floor after hours – in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child’s room appears empty, but Sulley finds to his horror that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-scarer, emerges from the child’s room and surreptitiously returns her door to an unseen door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of his work-partner and pal Mike Wazowski, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley’s home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to unusually high levels. Sulley nicknames the child “Boo” and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.

Near the end of the credits, it humorously states: “No monsters were used in the making of this film.”

The Great Escape

  • Directors: John Sturges
  • Producers: John Sturges
  • Writers: Book, Paul Brickhill, Screenplay, James Clavell, W R Burnett, Walter Newman
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Drama, History, Thriller, War
  • Actors: Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, James Donald, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence, James Coburn

Upset by the soldiers and resources wasted in recapturing escaped Allied prisoners of war (POWs), the German High Command concentrates the most-determined and successful of these prisoners to a new, high-security prisoner of war camp that the commandant, Luftwaffe Colonel von Luger (Hannes Messemer), proclaims escape-proof.

On the day of arrival, some of the prisoners make on-the-spur escape attempts which are all foiled by the sharp-eyed German “ferrets” or guards. As the POWs settle into their new camp, the Gestapo and the SS deliver the one they consider to be the most dangerous POW of all: “Big X”, Squadron Leader Roger Bartlett (Richard Attenborough), who is the prime organizer of most of the escape attempts made by Allied prisoners in Germany. Gestapo agent Kuhn (Hans Reiser) warns the Briton that he will be shot should he ever escape again. Locked up with “every escape artist in Germany”, Bartlett immediately plans the greatest escape attempted — a tunnel system for exfiltrating 250 prisoners of war, the idea being to “confuse and harass the enemy” to the point that more troops and resources will be wasted on finding and detaining POWs rather than being used on the front line.

Hilts is brought back alone to the camp, and subsequently to the cooler. His fellow American officer, USAAF 1st Lt Goff, throws him his baseball and glove as he walks into solitary confinement. As the Luftwaffe guard locks him in his cell and walks away, he hears the familiar sound of Hilts bouncing his baseball against the cell walls. The film ends with this scene under the caption “This picture is dedicated to the 50.”