The Count of Monte Cristo

  • Directors: Kevin Reynolds
  • Producers: Gary Barber, Roger Birbaum, Jonathan Glickman
  • Writers: Jay Wolpert
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Drama, History, Romance, Thriller
  • Actors: James Caviezel, Guy Pearce, Dagmara Dominczyk, Richard Harris

Edmond Dantès (James Caviezel) and his friend Fernand Mondego (Guy Pearce), officers of a French trading ship, head to Elba seeking medical attention for their captain. Dantès and Mondego are chased by British Dragoons who believe they are spies for the exiled Napoleon Bonaparte (Alex Norton). The Emperor arrives and declares they are not his agents, and asks Dantes to give a letter to a friend in France. When the captain dies that night, they are sent on their way.

At Marseilles, Dantès is reprimanded by the ship’s first mate, Danglars (Albie Woodington) for disobeying orders. However, the shipping company’s boss, Morrell (Patrick Godfrey), commends Dantès’ bravery, promoting him over Danglars. Mondego intercepts Dantès’ fiancée Mercédès (Dagmara Dominczyk) and unsuccessfully tries to seduce her. When he hears of Dantès’ promotion, Mondego realizes that Dantès will be able to marry Mercedes sooner than expected.

Mondego gets drunk and tells Danglars about the letter Napoleon gave Dantès. Danglars has Dantès charged with treason and sent to magistrate, J.F. Villefort (James Frain). Villefort is sure of Dantès’ innocence, but discovers the addressee is Villefort’s father, Clarion, a Bonapartist. Villefort denounced his father, improving his relations with the government. Villefort burns the letter and fools Dantès into submitting to arrest, then sends him to an island prison, Château d’If. Dantès escapes and goes to Mondego for help, but Mondego turns on him and wounds him so he cannot escape. Dantès is re-arrested and returned to Château d’If.

Three months later, Dantès returns to Château d’If to pay homage to the priest and promises him that he has given up on revenge and will live a better life. He then leaves the island with Mercédès, Albert, and Jacopo.

The Proposition

  • Directors: John Hillcoat
  • Producers: Chris Brown, Chiara Menage, Jackie O Sullivan, Cat Villiers
  • Writers: Nick Cave
  • Genres: Crime, Drama
  • Actors: Guy Pearce, Ray Winstone, Emily Watson, Danny Huston

Set in the Australian outback in the 1880s, the movie follows the series of events following the horrific rape and murder of the Hopkins family, allegedly committed by the infamous Burns brothers gang.

The film opens in a brothel during a violent gunfight between the police and Charlie Burns’ (Guy Pearce) gang, which ends with the deaths of all of the gang except for Charlie and his younger, mentally slow brother, Mikey (Richard Wilson), who is wounded. Captain Stanley (Ray Winstone) proposes a proposition to Charlie: he and Mikey can go free of the crimes they have committed if Charlie kills his older brother, Arthur (Danny Huston). Arthur is a mercurial psychopath who has become something of a legend and is so vicious that the aboriginal tribes refer to him as “The Dog Man” and both the police and the aboriginals refuse to go near his camp. Captain Stanley muses that perhaps the bounty hunters will kill Arthur in time and then states his intention to civilize the harsh wilderness he has been forced to live in by bringing Arthur to justice and uses Mikey as leverage. Charlie has nine days to find and kill Arthur, or else Mikey will be hanged from the gallows on Christmas Day.

Captain Stanley and Martha, who had become increasingly paranoid as they were ostracized by the townspeople after the flogging, let their guard down to have a peaceful, civilized Christmas dinner. Just then, Arthur and Samuel shoot open the door and invade their home. Arthur pulls Captain Stanley into the other room and brutally beats him, while Samuel taunts his wife. Arthur then shoots Captain Stanley in the shoulder, after which he calls Samuel to the room. Samuel pulls Martha into the room. As Samuel attempts to rape Martha, Charlie walks in and informs Arthur of Mikey’s death; Arthur ignores the news and encourages Charlie to listen to Samuel sing quoting how he does so like a bird. Charlie walks up to the unsuspecting Samuel and shoots him point blank in the head, then shoots Arthur twice, after saying simply, “No more.” After this Arthur walks out of the house. Charlie looks at a gun on the table and then tells Captain Stanley “I’m going to be with my brother.” Charlie leaves the house and follows a trail of blood to find Arthur hunched over on a hill nearby and sits down next to him. Arthur states that Charlie has finally stopped him and asks what he will do now, and then slowly dies as his brother watches the blood red sunset of the outback.

Bedtime Stories

  • Directors: Adam Shankman
  • Producers: Adam Sandler, Andrew Gunn, Jack Giarraputo
  • Writers: Matt Lopez, Tim Herlihy
  • Genres: Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Keri Russell, Guy Pearce, Russell Brand, Richard Griffiths, Teresa Palmer, Lucy Lawless, Courteney Cox

Skeeter Bronson (Adam Sandler) is a hotel handyman who was promised as a child by his father Marty (Jonathan Pryce) to be the manager of the family hotel, which was agreed to by Mr. Nottingham (Richard Griffiths) when the Bronson family reached bankruptcy and had to sell their hotel to him. When Nottingham announces plans to build a new hotel he appoints another man, the snotty Kendall (Guy Pearce) to become the manager, overshadowing Skeeter because Kendall is dating his daughter Violet.

Skeeter’s sister Wendy (Courteney Cox) asks him to watch her kids, because the school at which she is the principal is being closed and she is looking for a job in Arizona. Skeeter, who had been told not to visit their home by Wendy’s now-divorced husband had not gotten to know his niece and nephew Bobbi and Patrick (Laura Ann Kesling and Jonathan Morgan Heit) after some initial awkwardness, with both the kids and his day shift babysitter Jill (Keri Russell) he finally decides to settle them into bed and meets their pet guinea pig Bugsy (named because his eyes “Would look big on a cow!”) as they ask him to read a story, the environmental conservative storybooks that Wendy had weren’t satisfactory, so upon deciding to make his own story, he created it, wrapping around his own life as a medieval story about a squire named “Sir Fixalot” and his antagonist “Sir Buttkiss” (Kendall) during the course of the story the entranced kids make their own additions to the story, such as the king (Nottingham) giving Sir Fixalot a chance to prove himself worthy of the kingdom’s crown and usurp Buttkiss’ chances. During the celebration, Patrick announces that it starts raining gumballs, and the story ends at that. The following day, Skeeter is called to fix Nottingham’s television which had broken and during the visit, he tells Skeeter the “secret” theme that he had announced for the hotel, which was a rock and roll theme much like that of the Hard Rock Hotel when Skeeter points this out, he is offered the opportunity to come up with a better theme, a contest to prove if he may be more right for this position against Kendall. While celebrating his luck, Skeeter suddenly is greeted with a shower of gumballs raining down from above, which was also in the story the night before. Skeeter concludes that the story that he had told to the children had come true and quickly develops a plan to use it to his advantage.

Sometime later, he marries Jill and founds a hotel named after his late father. Kendall, for trying to destroy the School with Skeeter’s nephew and niece inside the building isn’t fired, instead he and his scheming partner Aspen (Lucy Lawless) are demoted to members of the hotel wait staff. Violet marries Mickey giving him control of the Nottingham Empire, becoming the 9th richest man alive, while Nottingham himself overcomes his fears of germs and becomes the School Nurse. In the meantime newlywed Skeeter and Jill have a baby.

The Hurt Locker

  • Directors: Kathryn Bigelow
  • Producers: Tony Mark, Nicolas Chartier, Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Greg Shapiro, Donall McCusker
  • Writers: Mark Boal
  • Genres: Action, Drama, Thriller, War
  • Actors: Jeremy Renner, Ralph Fiennes, Guy Pearce, Anthony Mackie, Brian Geraghty, Christian Camargo, David Morse, Evangeline Lilly

In Iraq, an elite U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) unit is forced to play a dangerous game of cat and mouse in the chaos of war in a city where everyone is a potential enemy and every object could be a deadly bomb.[10] Jeremy Renner plays the leader of the EOD team, as he contends with not only defusing bombs in the backdrop of a war, but also the psychological and emotional strain that it inflicts.[11]

L.A. Confidential

  • Directors: Curtis Hanson
  • Producers: Curtis Hanson, Arnon Milchan, Michael G Nathanson
  • Writers: Curtis Hanson, Brian Helgeland, based on a novel by, James Ellroy
  • Genres: Crime, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger, James Cromwell, David Strathairn, Danny DeVito

Set against the backdrop of the glitz, glamour, grit and noir of early 1950s Los Angeles the film revolves around three LAPD officers caught up in corruption, sex, lies, and murder following a multiple murder at the Nite Owl coffee shop. The story eventually encompasses organized crime, political corruption, heroin, pornography, prostitution, tabloid journalism, institutional racism, plastic surgery and Hollywood. The novel’s title refers to the infamous 1950s scandal magazine Confidential, portrayed fictionally therein as Hush-Hush (although a tabloid magazine called Hush-Hush also existed in the 1950s[1]).

Sergeant Edmund Exley (Pearce), the son of a legendary LAPD Inspector, is a brilliant officer in his own right, determined to outdo his father. Ed’s intelligence, his education, his glasses, his insistence on following regulations, and his cold demeanor all contribute to his social isolation from other officers. He increases this resentment after volunteering to testify against other cops in an infamous police brutality case (the Bloody Christmas incident) early on, insisting on a promotion to Detective Lieutenant (which he receives) against the advice of Captain Dudley Smith, who felt that Exley’s honesty and his reputation as a snitch would interfere with his ability to supervise detectives. He is motivated by justice, a sense of order, and his personal ambitions.

At different intervals the three men investigate the Nite Owl and concurrent events which in turn begin to reveal deep indications of corruption all around them. Ed Exley pursues absolute justice in the Nite Owl slayings, all the while trying to live up to his family’s prestigious name. Bud White pursues Nite Owl victim Susan Lefferts which leads him to Lynn Bracken, a Veronica Lake look-a-like and call-girl with pivotal ties to the case he and Exley are independently investigating. Meanwhile, Jack Vincennes follows up on a pornography racket that leads to ties to both the Nite Owl and Bracken’s handler Pierce Patchett, operator of “Fleur-De-Lis”, a call-girl service that runs prostitutes altered by plastic surgery to look like movie stars. All three men’s fate are thereby intertwined leading to a dramatic showdown with powerful and corrupt forces within the city’s political leadership and the department itself.

Memento

  • Directors: Christopher Nolan
  • Producers: Jennifer Todd, Suzanne Todd
  • Writers: Jonathan Nolan, Christopher Nolan
  • Genres: Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Guy Pearce, Carrie Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano

Note: The story is explained here in its chronological order, rather than the way it unfolds in the film.

Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) wakes up in an anonymous hotel room oblivious to his state. He has a phone conversation with an unknown caller in which he relates the story of Sammy Jankis (Stephen Tobolowsky), a man who suffered from anterograde amnesia, which prevented him from forming new memories. Leonard was previously an insurance fraud investigator assigned to determine if Sammy’s condition could be covered under his insurance policy. If his condition qualified as a physical injury that prevented him from carrying out his job, he and his wife (Harriet Sansom Harris) would be covered.

During his research, Leonard discovered that anterograde amnesia sufferers are still able to condition themselves to perform certain tasks. After Sammy repeatedly failed a conditioning test, Leonard concluded that Sammy’s memory loss was psychological, not physical, and the insurance claim was denied on grounds that Sammy was not covered for mental illnesses. Under the impression he could be cured if this was true, Sammy’s wife came back to the insurance agency, asking Leonard if he believed that Sammy was faking his short-term memory loss. Believing she wanted some kind of answer, Leonard diplomatically restated the insurer’s position: he believed Sammy was physically capable of creating new memories. Sammy’s wife, a diabetic, tried to confirm her belief that Sammy could make new memories by testing him, asking him repeatedly to give her an injection of insulin, every 20 minutes. After several doses, he unknowingly administered an overdose sending his wife into a coma. Sammy was later confined to a mental institution, incapable of remembering her death.

When Natalie learns Dodd is gone, she has a friend trace John G.’s license plate number from Leonard’s tattoo. She gives him a copy of the man’s driver’s license, and Leonard matches the ID to his photo of Teddy, whose real name is John Edward Gammel – “John G.”. Leonard’s plan for himself is complete, even though he’s forgotten that there was any plan at all: he concludes that Teddy is the man who raped and killed his wife. He takes Teddy to the abandoned building where he killed Jimmy Grantz only a few days before and shoots him in the head. Ignorant of the events that led him to this moment, Leonard takes one last picture of the murder scene, a memento of his quest for revenge.