Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines made out of glue and macaroni (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

Everybody s Fine

  • Directors: Kirk Jones
  • Producers: Gianni Nunnari, Ted Field, Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Glynis Murray
  • Writers: Kirk Jones
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Drew Barrymore, Kate Beckinsale, Sam Rockwell, Katherine Moennig

After visiting his physician and being warned about his health, Frank Goode (Robert De Niro) takes a train to New York, where he sits on his son David’s doorstep. David never shows up, but Frank sees one of David’s paintings in a nearby art gallery window. He slips an envelope under David’s door.

Next visit is to daughter Amy (Kate Beckinsale), who says it’s a bad time to visit. Frank plays a little golf with grandson Jack, but dinner is uncomfortable with tension between Jack and his father. The next morning, Frank accompanies Amy to her fancy office and hears her agency’s pitch for a TV ad. She takes him to the bus station to visit Robert.

As Frank travels to each of his children’s homes, the film cuts to phone conversations between the siblings. David is in some type of trouble in Mexico, and Amy is going there to find out what is happening; the sisters and Robert (Sam Rockwell) agree to not tell their father about David until they know for sure.

Frank arrives in Denver expecting to see Robert conduct the orchestra. It turns out Robert is “only” a percussionist. He also says Frank’s visit is at a bad time, so within hours Frank takes a bus to Las Vegas to visit Rosie (Drew Barrymore). Frank is adamant that each visit is a surprise, but Robert calls Rosie to warn her.

Frank goes back to New York to buy David’s painting but it has already been sold; the gallery shows him another painting by David that is more appropriate to him — a landscape showing PVC-covered power lines (Frank made PVC-covered cable for years). He visits his wife’s grave and talks to her. The last scene shows the family at Christmas. Frank is cooking the turkey and remembers that he always forgot to tell his wife hers was overcooked. The film ends with him walking into the dining room, to his family.

300

  • Directors: Zack Snyder
  • Producers: Frank Miller, Zack Snyder, Gianni Nunnari, Jeffrey Silver, Mark Canton
  • Writers: Screenplay, Zack Snyder, Kurt Johnstad, Michael Gordon, Comic Book, Frank Miller, Lynn Varley
  • Genres: Action, History, War
  • Actors: Gerard Butler, Lena Headey, David Wenham, Dominic West, Vincent Regan, Rodrigo Santoro

Through Dilios’ narration, the life of young Leonidas is depicted, chronicling his journey from a boy to a man per Spartan doctrine. Years later, after Leonidas is crowned King, Persian messengers arrive at the gates of Sparta demanding its submission to King Xerxes. Offended by their threats and behavior, King Leonidas and his guards kick the messengers into a well. Knowing that these actions will precipitate a Persian attack, Leonidas visits the Ephors — ancient priests whose blessing he needs to convince the Spartan council to authorize going to war. He proposes a strategy to repel the numerically superior Persians by using the terrain of Thermopylae (the Hot Gates)—his plan involves funneling the Persians into a narrow pass between the rocks and the sea. The Ephors consult the Oracle, who decrees that Sparta must not go to war. After Leonidas departs a messenger from Xerxes appears, rewarding the Ephors for their covert support and revealing that they have been corrupted by Xerxes.

Denied by the Ephors, Leonidas follows his plan anyway. While he does not require the council’s permission for this, taking such a small force, turns what had been a bold strategy into a certain suicide mission. Leonidas hopes that the sacrifice of himself and his men will spur the council to defy the Ephors and all of Greece to unite against the threat to freedom and democracy (represented by Greece) posed by slavery and tyranny (represented by Persia).

In Sparta, Queen Gorgo reluctantly submits sexually to the influential Theron in exchange for help in persuading the Spartan council to send reinforcements to Leonidas. Following her address to the Council, Theron publicly betrays the Queen, prompting the councilmen to cry out in outrage and Gorgo to kill him out of rage, which spills open a bag of Xerxes’ gold from his robe. The exposure of Theron’s treachery, along with their Queen’s plea, prompts the Council to unite against Persia. Meanwhile, at Thermopylae, the Persians use the goat path to surround the Spartans. Xerxes’ general demands their surrender, again offering Leonidas titles and prestige. Leonidas seemingly bows in submission, allowing one of his men to leap over him and kill the general. A furious Xerxes orders his troops to attack. As Persian archers shoot at the remaining Spartans, Leonidas rises and hurls his spear at Xerxes, cutting the King on the cheek, thus making good on his promise to make “the God-King bleed.” Visibly disturbed by this reminder of his own mortality, Xerxes watches as all of the Spartans are cut down by a massive barrage of arrows. Concluding his tale before an audience of attentive Spartans, Dilios declares that the Persian army, depleted by desertions out of fear the heavy casualties they suffered at the hands of a mere 300 Spartans, now faces 10,000 Spartans commanding 30,000 Greeks. Although still outnumbered, Dilios declares that the Greeks shall have victory. Praising Leonidas’ sacrifice, Dilios leads the assembled Greek army in a charge against the Persian army, the Battle of Plataea.