The Bounty Hunter

  • Directors: Andy Tennant
  • Producers: Neal H Moritz
  • Writers: Sarah Thorp
  • Genres: Action, Comedy, Romance
  • Actors: Jennifer Aniston, Gerard Butler

Milo Boyd (Gerard Butler), a down-on-his-luck bounty hunter, gets his dream job when he is assigned to track down his bail-jumping ex-wife, reporter Nicole Hurly (Jennifer Aniston). He thinks all that’s ahead is an easy payday, but when Nicole gives him the slip so she can chase a lead on a murder cover-up, Milo realizes that nothing ever goes simply with him and Nicole. The exes continue to one-up each other until they find themselves on the run for their lives. If they thought their promise to love, honor and obey was tough, staying alive is going to be a whole lot tougher.

How to Train Your Dragon

  • Directors: Chris Sanders, Dean DeBlois
  • Producers: Bonnie Arnold, Michael Connolly, Tim Johnson
  • Writers: Dean DeBlois, Chris Sanders, Story, Cressida Cowell
  • Genres: Animation
  • Actors: Jay Baruchel, America Ferrera, Jonah Hill, Gerard Butler, Christopher Mintz Plasse, Craig Ferguson

The film is set in a mythical world of vikings and dragons. The story centers around a viking teenager named Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), who lives on the island of Berk, where fighting dragons is a way of life. The teen’s smarts and offbeat sense of humor is disliked by his tribe and its chief, Hiccup’s father. However, when Hiccup is included in Dragon Training with the other viking teens, he sees his chance to prove he has what it takes to be a fighter. After he entangles a dragon with a bolas-shooting cannon, Hiccup releases and ends up befriending the dragon. This relationship flips his world upside down as he strives to convince his tribe that they do not need to be dragon-slayers. In the novel, the dragon which is named Toothless is incredibly small for a dragon. In the film, Toothless is a Night Fury, the rarest of all dragons, and is large enough to serve as a flying mount for Hiccup and Astrid.

In initial development, the plot followed the original novel closely but was then altered. About halfway through production, Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois took over as co-directors. The original plot was “heavily loyal to the book” but was regarded as geared to a too-young demographic and too “sweet” and “whimsical”, according to Baruchel.[2]

The Ugly Truth

  • Directors: Robert Luketic
  • Producers: Katherine Heigl, Karen McCullah Lutz, Kirsten Smith, Tom Rosenberg
  • Writers: Story, Nicole Eastman, Screenplay, Karen McCullah Lutz, Kirsten Smith, Nicole Eastman
  • Genres: Comedy, Romance
  • Actors: Katherine Heigl, Gerard Butler

Abby Richter (Katherine Heigl) is a morning show TV producer in Sacramento, California. Coming home from a disastrous date one night, she happens to see a segment of a local television show, “The Ugly Truth”, run by Mike Chadway (Gerard Butler), whose cynicism about relationships prompts Abby to call into the show to argue with him on-air. The next day, she discovers that the station is threatening to cancel her show because of its poor ratings, and the station owner has hired Mike to do a segment on her show to bring them back up.

At first, the two have a rocky relationship; Abby thinks Mike is crass and disgusting while Mike finds Abby to be a control freak. Nevertheless, when she meets the man of her dreams, a doctor named Colin (Eric Winter) living next to her, Mike persuades her to follow his lead. She agrees to his helpful advice and if he can get her the man she wants, proving his theories on relationships, she will work happily with him, but if Mike fails, he agrees to quit.[2]

Mike succeeds in improving the ratings of the show, helps bring the married co-anchors closer together, and successfully guides Abby to be exactly what Colin would want. Mike is invited to appear on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and is being offered the chance to move to another network. Abby is forced to cancel a romantic weekend away with Colin, during which they had planned to finally sleep together, and instead go with Mike and persuade him to stay with the morning show. After the show, they go for drinks and dancing, and Mike admits he doesn’t want to move and is happier to stay in Sacramento with his sister and nephew. In the elevator, they passionately kiss and almost get to the point of intense sex but leave for their separate rooms when the doors open. Mike, dealing with his inner conflict of the intensity of his feelings for Abby, calls on her room only to find Colin has shown up to surprise her. He leaves Abby to be with Colin. Abby is upset and soon realizes Colin only likes the woman she has been pretending to be, not the real her, and she breaks up with him.

Mike leaves for another local station, but ends up doing an outside broadcast at the same hot-air balloon festival as Abby, and he cannot resist returning to argue with her when she kicks the new “Mike Chadway” imitator off the air and goes into a tirade about men. The balloon they are standing in takes off while they argue and finally, Abby tells Mike she broke up with Colin, and Mike admits he loves her. Abby then kisses him and they are shown kissing passionately while flying off in the balloon. Despite their obvious differences, they stay together and at the end of the movie, are shown having intense sex. Mike, unsure of whether he’s taught Abby how to fake too well, asks if her response at climax was genuine after the lights are switched on. Abby responds by smiling and saying he’ll never know before shutting off the lights again.

Law Abiding Citizen

  • Directors: F Gary Gray
  • Producers: Gerard Butler, Kurt Wimmer, Mark Gill, Lucas Foster, Alan Siegel
  • Writers: Kurt Wimmer
  • Genres: Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Gerard Butler, Jamie Foxx, Leslie Bibb, Colm Meaney, Viola Davis, Bruce McGill

After a home invasion leaves his wife and daughter dead, engineer Clyde Shelton (Gerard Butler) is told that one of the criminals responsible will not be convicted, as much of the evidence against him was compromised by a bungled forensic investigation. Shelton pleads for the prosecutor, Nick Rice (Jamie Foxx), to take the case to court. However, Rice is mostly interested in maintaining his 96% conviction rate, and tells Shelton that it does not matter what is right, but what can be proved in court. Rice then makes a deal with Clarence Darby (Christian Stolte), the actual criminal who raped and murdered Shelton’s wife and daughter, for third-degree murder; his accomplice, Rupert Ames (Josh Stewart), is sent to death row on what is essentially a theft charge.

Ten years later, Ames is executed by lethal injection; due to a chemical alteration, he dies an agonizing death. Initial evidence leads to Darby, who is alerted to the presence of police by a stranger who calls Darby’s phone, helping him escape. The stranger orders Darby to throw away his gun and get in a cop car, whose lone occupant was tased by the stranger beforehand. The caller has Darby drive to an abandoned warehouse, where Darby forces the cop out of the car and, with the cop’s gun, gets ready to execute him. However, the cop is revealed to be Shelton in disguise; when Darby attempts to shoot him, the gun handle injects him with tetrodotoxin, paralyzing him. Shelton proceeds to lead Darby into the warehouse, where he straps him to an operating table and systematically dismembers him while he’s awake. The police come upon Darby’s remains, and Rice quickly arrests Shelton as the suspect.

The film ends with Rice joining his wife for his daughter’s recital.

300

  • Directors: Zack Snyder
  • Producers: Frank Miller, Zack Snyder, Gianni Nunnari, Jeffrey Silver, Mark Canton
  • Writers: Screenplay, Zack Snyder, Kurt Johnstad, Michael Gordon, Comic Book, Frank Miller, Lynn Varley
  • Genres: Action, History, War
  • Actors: Gerard Butler, Lena Headey, David Wenham, Dominic West, Vincent Regan, Rodrigo Santoro

Through Dilios’ narration, the life of young Leonidas is depicted, chronicling his journey from a boy to a man per Spartan doctrine. Years later, after Leonidas is crowned King, Persian messengers arrive at the gates of Sparta demanding its submission to King Xerxes. Offended by their threats and behavior, King Leonidas and his guards kick the messengers into a well. Knowing that these actions will precipitate a Persian attack, Leonidas visits the Ephors — ancient priests whose blessing he needs to convince the Spartan council to authorize going to war. He proposes a strategy to repel the numerically superior Persians by using the terrain of Thermopylae (the Hot Gates)—his plan involves funneling the Persians into a narrow pass between the rocks and the sea. The Ephors consult the Oracle, who decrees that Sparta must not go to war. After Leonidas departs a messenger from Xerxes appears, rewarding the Ephors for their covert support and revealing that they have been corrupted by Xerxes.

Denied by the Ephors, Leonidas follows his plan anyway. While he does not require the council’s permission for this, taking such a small force, turns what had been a bold strategy into a certain suicide mission. Leonidas hopes that the sacrifice of himself and his men will spur the council to defy the Ephors and all of Greece to unite against the threat to freedom and democracy (represented by Greece) posed by slavery and tyranny (represented by Persia).

In Sparta, Queen Gorgo reluctantly submits sexually to the influential Theron in exchange for help in persuading the Spartan council to send reinforcements to Leonidas. Following her address to the Council, Theron publicly betrays the Queen, prompting the councilmen to cry out in outrage and Gorgo to kill him out of rage, which spills open a bag of Xerxes’ gold from his robe. The exposure of Theron’s treachery, along with their Queen’s plea, prompts the Council to unite against Persia. Meanwhile, at Thermopylae, the Persians use the goat path to surround the Spartans. Xerxes’ general demands their surrender, again offering Leonidas titles and prestige. Leonidas seemingly bows in submission, allowing one of his men to leap over him and kill the general. A furious Xerxes orders his troops to attack. As Persian archers shoot at the remaining Spartans, Leonidas rises and hurls his spear at Xerxes, cutting the King on the cheek, thus making good on his promise to make “the God-King bleed.” Visibly disturbed by this reminder of his own mortality, Xerxes watches as all of the Spartans are cut down by a massive barrage of arrows. Concluding his tale before an audience of attentive Spartans, Dilios declares that the Persian army, depleted by desertions out of fear the heavy casualties they suffered at the hands of a mere 300 Spartans, now faces 10,000 Spartans commanding 30,000 Greeks. Although still outnumbered, Dilios declares that the Greeks shall have victory. Praising Leonidas’ sacrifice, Dilios leads the assembled Greek army in a charge against the Persian army, the Battle of Plataea.

Citizen Game

  • Directors: Mark Neveldine, Brian Taylor
  • Producers: Tom Rosenberg, Gary Lucchesi, Richard Wright, Skip Williamson
  • Writers:
  • Genres: Sci-Fi, Thriller
  • Actors: Gerard Butler

Set in the near-future, mind-control technology has taken society by storm and a multiplayer on-line game called “Slayers” allows humans control other humans in mass-scale. Simon controls Kable (Gerard Butler) the on-line champion of the game, and with his every move tracked by millions, his ultimate challenge becomes regaining his identity and independence by defeating the game’s mastermind (Hall) through launching an attack on the system that has imprisoned him.[1]