Brooklyn s Finest

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Basil Iwanyk, John Langley, John Thompson, Elie Cohn
  • Writers: Michael C Martin
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Drama
  • Actors: Richard Gere, Don Cheadle, Ethan Hawke, and Wesley Snipes

The film takes place within the notoriously rough Brownsville section of Brooklyn and especially within the Van Dyke housing projects in the NYPD’s sixty-fifth precinct. Three policemen struggle with the sometimes fine line between right and wrong.

The opening scene shows two men sitting in a parked car having a conversation, the man in the drivers seat, Carlo (Vincent D’Onofrio) is then shot unexpectedly in the face by the passenger (revealed to be Sal) who then robs Carlo and runs off.

Detective Salvatore “Sal” Procida (Ethan Hawke), desperate for money to feed and house his rapidly growing family, has started pocketing the money left on the table during drug raids. Deeply religious, he finds that he’s in the bad place of trying to reconcile his misdeeds with his needs. The mold in the walls of his home is making his wife (Lili Taylor) ill and endangering the life of his unborn twins. And the down payment on his coveted new, bigger house is past due.

Officer Eddie Dugan (Richard Gere) is a week from retirement after twenty-two years of less-than-exemplary service to the force when he’s assigned to oversee rookies in the tough neighborhoods. His life in shambles, Eddie is barely hanging on, swilling whiskey in the morning to get out of bed. His only friend is the prostitute he frequents.

The closing scene shows Eddie having rescued the missing person, and an assortment of other women, and in the process having redeemed himself from the reputation he earned within the precinct of being a failure as an officer.

Training Day

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Bruce Berman and Davis Guggenheim
  • Writers: David Ayer
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke

The film follows a single day in the life of a young LAPD cop Jake Hoyt (Hawke) as he is subject to an evaluation by Detective Alonzo Harris (Washington), a highly decorated LAPD narcotics officer who could put him on the path for rapid career advancement.

After meeting in a diner, Jake rides with Alonzo in his car, a black 1979 Chevrolet Monte Carlo lowrider, during the day. From the first few moments of their interaction, it becomes quickly apparent that Jake’s belief in the system is in stark contrast to Alonzo’s philosophy of blending in with “the real world” without regard for the rules. They first detain some college students buying marijuana from a dealer, but instead of arresting them they confiscate the drugs. Alonzo offers Jake a hit from the marijuana which Jake initially refuses. Alonzo threatens him and states that a drug dealer would have killed him for refusing. Jake stands fast, but Alonzo puts a gun to his head and threatens to throw him out of the car. Jake relents and takes the hit, but quickly discovers that the marijuana was laced with PCP.

Alonzo then takes Jake to the home of a man named Roger (Scott Glenn) for an apparent social call. After leaving Roger’s, Jake notices a female high school student being attacked by two men in a side alley. He demands Alonzo to pull over as he jumps out to save her. Alonzo watches, but doesn’t intervene. Jake wants to process the men and the girl, but Alonzo dismisses her and leaves the two men out on the street, saying the girl’s cousin (a gang member) will take care of her attackers. Jake denounces this as street justice, but Alonzo tells him that as a narcotics detective he is focused on shutting down major drug operations, not stopping individual crimes. Jake discovers the girl’s wallet and takes it with him.

In his desperate escape to LAX, Alonzo is surrounded at a quiet intersection by a crew of Russian hitmen who spray his car with machine gun fire. The final scene has Jake pulling into his driveway and going home to his wife, Lisa (Charlotte Ayanna), and daughter, while a radio broadcast reports Alonzo’s death — describing it as occurring honorably ‘in the line of duty.’

Daybreakers

  • Directors: Peter Spierig, Michael Spierig
  • Producers: Chris Brown, Sean Furst, Bryan Furst
  • Writers: Peter Spierig, Michael Spierig
  • Genres: Action, Drama, Horror, Thriller
  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe, Sam Neill

In 2019, a plague transforms the world’s population into vampires. With fewer humans to provide blood, the vampires seek to farm the remaining humans and to find a way to continue their existence. A secret team of vampires uncover a way that would rescue the human race.[1]

Before Sunrise

  • Directors: Richard Linklater
  • Producers: Anne Walker McBay
  • Writers: Richard Linklater, Kim Krizan
  • Genres: Drama, Romance
  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy

The film starts with Jesse meeting Céline on a train from Budapest and striking up a conversation with her. Jesse is going to Vienna to catch a flight back to the United States, whereas Céline is returning to university in Paris after visiting her grandmother.

When they reach Vienna, Jesse convinces Céline to disembark with him, saying that 10 or 20 years down the road, she might not be happy with her marriage and might wonder how her life would have been different if she had picked another guy, and this is a chance to realize that he himself is not that different from the rest. In his words, he is “the same boring, unmotivated guy.” Jesse has to catch a flight early in the morning and does not have enough money to rent a room for the night, so they decide to roam around in Vienna.

After visiting a few landmarks in Vienna, they share a kiss at the top of the Riesenrad ferris wheel at sunset and start to feel a romantic connection. As they continue to roam around the city, they begin to talk more openly with each other, with conversations ranging from topics about love, life, religion, and their observations of the city.

They admit their attraction to each other and how the night has made them feel, though they understand that they probably won’t see each other again when they leave. They simply decide to make the best of what time they have left, ending the night with the implication of sexual encounter between them. At that point, Jesse explains that if given the choice, he’d marry her instead of never seeing her again. The film ends the next day at the train station, where the two hastily agree to meet together at the same place in six months as the train is about to leave.

Before Sunrise

  • Directors: Richard Linklater
  • Producers: Anne Walker McBay
  • Writers: Richard Linklater, Kim Krizan
  • Genres: Drama, Romance
  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy

The film starts with Jesse meeting Céline on a train from Budapest and striking up a conversation with her. Jesse is going to Vienna to catch a flight back to the United States, whereas Céline is returning to university in Paris after visiting her grandmother.

When they reach Vienna, Jesse convinces Céline to disembark with him, saying that 10 or 20 years down the road, she might not be happy with her marriage and might wonder how her life would have been different if she had picked another guy, and this is a chance to realize that he himself is not that different from the rest. In his words, he is “the same boring, unmotivated guy.” Jesse has to catch a flight early in the morning and does not have enough money to rent a room for the night, so they decide to roam around in Vienna.

After visiting a few landmarks in Vienna, they share a kiss at the top of the Riesenrad ferris wheel at sunset and start to feel a romantic connection. As they continue to roam around the city, they begin to talk more openly with each other, with conversations ranging from topics about love, life, religion, and their observations of the city.

They admit their attraction to each other and how the night has made them feel, though they understand that they probably won’t see each other again when they leave. They simply decide to make the best of what time they have left, ending the night with the implication of sexual encounter between them. At that point, Jesse explains that if given the choice, he’d marry her instead of never seeing her again. The film ends the next day at the train station, where the two hastily agree to meet together at the same place in six months as the train is about to leave.

Dead Poets Society

  • Directors: Peter Weir
  • Producers: Steven Haft, Paul Junger Witt, Tony Thomas
  • Writers: Tom Schulman
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles, Gale Hansen, Dylan Kussman, Allelon Ruggiero, James Waterston, Norman Lloyd, Alexandra Powers

Seven boys, Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke), Knox Overstreet (Josh Charles), Charlie Dalton (Gale Hansen), Richard Cameron (Dylan Kussman), Steven Meeks (Allelon Ruggiero) and Gerard Pitts (James Waterston) attend the prestigious Welton Academy prep school, which is based on four principles: Tradition, Honor, Discipline and Excellence.

On the first day of class, the students are introduced to their overwhelming and extraordinary curriculum by sullen headmaster Gale Nolan (Norman Lloyd). However, their new English teacher John Keating (Robin Williams) tells the students that they may call him “O Captain! My Captain!” (the title of a Walt Whitman poem) if they feel daring. His first lesson is unorthodox by Welton standards, whistling the 1812 Overture and taking them out of the classroom to focus on the idea of carpe diem (Latin for ‘seize the day’) by looking at the pictures of former Welton students in a trophy case. In a later class Keating has Neil read the introduction to their poetry textbook, a staid, dry essay entitled “Understanding Poetry” by the fictional academic Dr. J. Evans Pritchard, Ph. D., which describes how to place the quality of a poem on a scale, and rate it with a number. Keating finds the idea of such mathematical literary criticism ridiculous (calling it “excrement”) and encourages his pupils to rip the introductory essay out of their textbooks. After a brief reaction of disbelief, they do so gleefully as Keating congratulates them with the memorable line “Begone, J. Evans Pritchard, Ph. D” (much to the surprise and disbelief of one of Keating’s colleagues). He later has the students stand on his desk as a reminder to look at the world in a different way, just as Henry David Thoreau intended when he wrote, “The universe is wider than our views of it” (Walden).

In the film’s dramatic conclusion, the boys return to English class following Keating’s termination. The class is now being temporarily taught by Nolan, who has the boys read from the very Pritchard essay they had ripped out at the start of the semester. As the lesson drones on, Keating enters the room to retrieve a few belongings. On his way out, Todd apologizes to Keating for having signed the confession, citing the force exercised by the Academy. Keating acknowledges this. Nolan sternly orders Todd to be quiet and demands that Keating leave at once. As he exits the door, Keating is startled to hear “Captain! My Captain!” being called out by Todd, who has stood on his desk as Keating bid him to do earlier, demonstrating the new perspective Keating has taught him. Enraged, Nolan warns Todd to sit down immediately or face expulsion, only to be defied. Then, one after another, the members of the Dead Poet’s Society (except Cameron) climb onto their desks (the first exclaiming “O Captain! My Captain!”–the others silenty but resolutely) as a form of salute. The furious Nolan is defeated; he cannot expel half the class without compromising the school’s image, and with it his reputation. Keating is touched and thanks the boys. He then leaves Welton for good, satisfied that the life lessons he has imparted to them have left their marks.

Tape

  • Directors: Richard Linklater
  • Producers: Gary Winick, Anne Walker Mcbay, Alexis Alexanian
  • Writers: Stephen Belber
  • Genres: Drama
  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard, Uma Thurman

In a motel room in Lansing, Michigan. Vince (Hawke), a drug dealer/volunteer firefighter, is in town to support his old high school friend’s entry into the Lansing film festival.

His friend, documentary filmmaker Jon Salter (Leonard), joins Vince in his motel room and the two begin to reminisce about their high school years. They get on the subject of Amy (Thurman), Vince’s former girlfriend. It appears that, while they dated for some time, Vince and Amy never had sex. However, after their relationship had ended, Amy slept with Jon.

Vince claims Amy had told him that Jon had raped her. Vince becomes obsessed with, and eventually succeeds in getting a verbal confession from Jon about, the alleged rape. Immediately after Jon’s admission, Vince pulls out a hidden tape recorder that had been recording their whole conversation, much to Jon’s horror. Vince then tells Jon that he has invited Amy to dinner, and that she will be arriving shortly.

Eventually Amy does arrive and, even though all three of them feel awkward, they begin to talk. Amy explains that she is now an assistant district attorney in the Lansing Justice Department. Eventually the three discuss what actually happened between Jon and Amy that night at the party.

Amy reveals that she didn’t really call the police, and leaves.