The Uninvited

  • Directors: Charles Guard, Thomas Guard
  • Producers: Michael Grillo, Ivan Reitman, Tom Pollock, Walter F Parkes, Laurie MacDonald, Riyoko Tanaka
  • Writers: Screenplay, Craig Rosenberg, Doug Miro, Carlo Bernard Original Screenplay, Kim Jee Woon
  • Genres: Drama, Horror, Thriller
  • Actors: Emily Browning, Arielle Kebbel, Elizabeth Banks, David Strathairn, Maya Massar, Lex Burnham

The movie begins with a young girl, Anna (Emily Browning), making out with her boyfriend Matt on the beach at a party. While this is happening, you hear Anna’s voice: “I’m on a beach”, implying that she is describing a dream. After a few moments he tells Anna he loves her and has “a condom”, she tells him she just can’t do it, gets up, and leaves. As she goes, her sister Alex (Arielle Kebbel) asks if everything is all right. She ignores her, and Alex goes back to what she was doing. On the way to her house she travels through the woods. Anna encounters three garbage bags lying around. She pauses, then goes to pass them when one of them twitches and shakes. She approaches it cautiously when it falls open and the dirty, twisted body of a young red haired girl falls out. As Anna stands, shocked, the head suddenly twists around and looks at her and says “Don’t go home”. Screaming and afraid, Anna runs home. She then hears a bell, which later is implied that was worn by her terminally ill mother and rung when she needed something. When she walks in, she states that her mother is alone but that she should never be alone. She enters the front of the house. Again, her voice narates, saying “Something is wrong. There’s something evil in the house.” It is coming from her father’s study. As Anna aproaches it, blood begins to pour from the keyhole. Suddenly, random clips begin to play, including a falling watering pail and a shattering glass orb. The dream ends, and Anna is revealed talking to a psychiatrist.

While Anna is back at the institution she says to her psychologist that she did what he had told her to, she had “finished what she started”. It is also revealed that the institutionalized woman at the beginning was “Mildred Kemp”. (Which makes sense, because Mildred asked “who am I going to tell my stories to?,” which means that while Anna moved back into the house, she was remembering the stories Mildred had told her, and putting them into her own version). To explain the matter of pearls, Mildred took them from the Wright family mother and wife, and it can be seen at the end of the movie that Mildred has the pearls in her hands while she closes her room’s door . It seems that it is only a coincidence that Rachel also has a pearl necklace, as there can’t be any relationship between Rachel and Mildred. It also shows that when Rachel was listenning in on them, she was actually worried because Anna was talking to herself. No one ever spoke directly to Alex or interacted with her except Anna; she never sent letters, and that was why her father ignored her. The last things you see are Anna smiling, and then the door across the hall shuts, showing the residents name: ‘Mildred Kemp’.

We Are Marshall

  • Directors: McG
  • Producers: McG, Basil Iwanyk
  • Writers: Story, Jamie Linden, Cory Helms, Screenplay, Jamie Linden
  • Genres: Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Matthew McConaughey, Matthew Fox, Anthony Mackie, Kate Mara, Ian McShane, David Strathairn, Kimberly Williams Paisley, Robert Patrick, Brian Geraghty, January Jones

On the evening of November 14, 1970, Southern Airways Flight 932, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9 which Huntington, West Virginia’s Marshall University chartered to transport the Thundering Herd football team to Greenville, North Carolina and back to Huntington, clipped trees on a ridge just one mile short of the runway at Tri-State Airport in Ceredo, West Virginia and crashed into a gully. The team was returning from their game against the East Carolina University Pirates — a 17–14 loss. There were no survivors. In all, seventy-five people lost their lives. The dead included the thirty-seven players, head coach Rick Tolley and five members of his coaching staff, Charles E. Kautz, Marshall’s athletics director, team trainer Jim Schroer and his assistant, Donald Tackett, twenty-two boosters, and five crew members.

In the wake of the tragedy, President Donald Dedmon leans towards indefinitely suspending the football program, but he is ultimately persuaded to reconsider by the pleas of the Marshall students and Huntington residents, and especially the few football players who didn’t make the flight. Dedmon hires a young new head coach Jack Lengyel, who, with the help of Red Dawson, manages to rebuild the team in a relatively short time. They are aided by the NCAA’s waiver of a rule prohibiting freshmen from playing varsity football (a rule which had been abolished in 1968 for all sports except for football and basketball, and would be permanently abolished for those sports in 1972). The new team is composed mostly of the eighteen returning players (three varsity, fifteen sophomores) and walk-on athletes from other Marshall sports programs. Due to their lack of experience, the “Young Thundering Herd” ends up losing their first game, 29-6 to the Morehead State Eagles. The Herd’s first post-crash victory is a heart-stopping 15–13 home win against Xavier University in the first home game of the season.

The following week, Marshall lost to the Miami Redskins 66 to 6. They would win only one more game in 1971. Jack Lengyel resigned as head coach in 1974 with a record of 9-33. He would later become athletic director at the Naval Academy. He’s now in the Hall of Fame. Donald Dedmond accepted the presidency at Radford University where he would remain until he retired in 1994. Gene Morehouse’s son Keith followed in his fathers footsteps and became a broadcaster for Marshall Football where he remains today. Reggie Oliver started every game for the Thundering Herd until he graduated. He later returned to Marshall as an assistant coach and now lives in Ohio. After graduation, Nate Ruffin moved away from Huntington, got married and started a family. In 2001, after an illness, Nate died at his home in Virginia. He would return to Hunington one last time for a reuninon with his old buddies

The Firm

  • Directors: Sydney Pollack
  • Producers: John Davis, Sydney Pollack, Scott Rudin
  • Writers: John Grisham, David Rabe, Robert Towne, David Rayfiel
  • Genres: Thriller, Drama
  • Actors: Tom Cruise, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Gene Hackman, Ed Harris, Holly Hunter, Hal Holbrook, David Strathairn

A new attorney, Mitch McDeere, is drawn into a seductive law firm that seems to have many secrets. When he finds out who they are representing and what price has been paid by others who have come across the truth, he risks it all to escape with his law license and his life.

The Bourne Ultimatum

  • Directors: Paul Greengrass
  • Producers: Patrick Crowley, Frank Marshall
  • Writers: Screenplay, Tony Gilroy, Scott Z Burns, George Nolfi, Tom Stoppard, Story, Tony Gilroy, Novel, Robert Ludlum
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, David Strathairn, Scott Glenn, Paddy Considine, Edgar Ramirez, with Albert Finney, and Joan Allen

The movie begins before the end of the events in The Bourne Supremacy, as Bourne, wounded by a gunshot from the Russian assassin Kirill, is still evading the Moscow police. Cornered by two officers while breaking into a medical clinic to treat his wounds, Bourne overpowers the officers, knocking one out, while holding the second at gunpoint. He leaves them alive as he escapes, saying, My argument is not with you.

Six weeks later, Simon Ross, a security correspondent for The Guardian, meets with someone in Turin, to discuss Treadstone. Bourne goes to Paris to tell Marie’s brother, Martin, of her death, then heads to London. Bourne then reads an article in The Guardian by Ross about Bourne, Treadstone, and “Operation Blackbriar.” He then arranges to meet Ross in London at the south entrance of Waterloo Station. Ross, however, is under surveillance because his use of the word “Blackbriar” in a phone call to his editor was tracked by ECHELON, alerting the CIA. CIA section chief Noah Vosen alerts his staff at the Anti-Terrorism Deep Cover in New York to find out any information on Ross, believing that Operation Blackbriar has been compromised.

After receiving a call from Bourne, Ross takes a taxi to Waterloo Station. At the station, Bourne sees CIA officers following Ross and places a prepaid mobile phone on him; through it, Bourne instructs him on how to dodge the station’s surveillance. However, Vosen orders an assassin, Paz, to kill Ross and his source. Vosen’s team identifies Bourne on a security camera and recognizes him as the original Treadstone assassin, and assumes he is Ross’s source. While Paz gets into position with a sniper rifle, Bourne tells Ross to remain hidden, but Ross panics and steps out into the open, allowing Paz to deliver a clear kill shot. In the chaos, Bourne grabs Ross’s notes, revealing his source as Neil Daniels, the Madrid CIA station chief.

Images of Bourne’s unmoving body floating in the river are interspersed with images of Nicky watching a news report, sometime later, noting the exposure of Blackbriar, the arrests of Hirsch and Vosen, that Ezra Kramer is the subject of a United States Senate hearing regarding his conduct, and that David Webb, alias Jason Bourne, was shot and fell into the East River but his body has not been recovered, even after a three-day search, at which point Nicky smiles. In the final moments of the film Bourne is shown swimming away in the East River.

L.A. Confidential

  • Directors: Curtis Hanson
  • Producers: Curtis Hanson, Arnon Milchan, Michael G Nathanson
  • Writers: Curtis Hanson, Brian Helgeland, based on a novel by, James Ellroy
  • Genres: Crime, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger, James Cromwell, David Strathairn, Danny DeVito

Set against the backdrop of the glitz, glamour, grit and noir of early 1950s Los Angeles the film revolves around three LAPD officers caught up in corruption, sex, lies, and murder following a multiple murder at the Nite Owl coffee shop. The story eventually encompasses organized crime, political corruption, heroin, pornography, prostitution, tabloid journalism, institutional racism, plastic surgery and Hollywood. The novel’s title refers to the infamous 1950s scandal magazine Confidential, portrayed fictionally therein as Hush-Hush (although a tabloid magazine called Hush-Hush also existed in the 1950s[1]).

Sergeant Edmund Exley (Pearce), the son of a legendary LAPD Inspector, is a brilliant officer in his own right, determined to outdo his father. Ed’s intelligence, his education, his glasses, his insistence on following regulations, and his cold demeanor all contribute to his social isolation from other officers. He increases this resentment after volunteering to testify against other cops in an infamous police brutality case (the Bloody Christmas incident) early on, insisting on a promotion to Detective Lieutenant (which he receives) against the advice of Captain Dudley Smith, who felt that Exley’s honesty and his reputation as a snitch would interfere with his ability to supervise detectives. He is motivated by justice, a sense of order, and his personal ambitions.

At different intervals the three men investigate the Nite Owl and concurrent events which in turn begin to reveal deep indications of corruption all around them. Ed Exley pursues absolute justice in the Nite Owl slayings, all the while trying to live up to his family’s prestigious name. Bud White pursues Nite Owl victim Susan Lefferts which leads him to Lynn Bracken, a Veronica Lake look-a-like and call-girl with pivotal ties to the case he and Exley are independently investigating. Meanwhile, Jack Vincennes follows up on a pornography racket that leads to ties to both the Nite Owl and Bracken’s handler Pierce Patchett, operator of “Fleur-De-Lis”, a call-girl service that runs prostitutes altered by plastic surgery to look like movie stars. All three men’s fate are thereby intertwined leading to a dramatic showdown with powerful and corrupt forces within the city’s political leadership and the department itself.