The Simpsons Movie

  • Directors: David Silverman
  • Producers: James L Brooks, Matt Groening, Al Jean, Mike Scully, Richard Sakai
  • Writers: James L Brooks, Matt Groening, Al Jean, Ian Maxtone Graham, George Meyer, David Mirkin, Mike Reiss, Mike Scully, Matt Selman, John Swartzwelder, Jon Vitti
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy
  • Actors: Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria, Harry Shearer, Albert Brooks, Tress MacNeille

While performing on Lake Springfield, the rock band Green Day is killed when pollution in the lake erodes their barge. At a memorial service, Grampa has a prophetic vision in which he predicts the impending doom of the town, but only Marge takes it seriously. Lisa and an Irish boy named Colin, with whom she has fallen in love, hold a meeting where they convince the town to clean up the lake.

Meanwhile, Homer adopts a pig from Krusty Burger. Homer stores the pig’s feces in an overflowing silo which Marge tells him to dispose of safely. However, Homer gets distracted and instead dumps the silo in the lake, re-polluting it. Moments later, a squirrel jumps into the lake and becomes severely mutated. Nearby, Flanders and Bart discover the squirrel during a hike, and the EPA captures it. Russ Cargill, head of the EPA, presents five options to President Schwarzenegger to keep Springfield’s pollution contained; he randomly picks the action of enclosing Springfield in a large glass dome. When the police discover Homer’s silo in the lake, an angry mob of townspeople approach the Simpsons’ home and set the house on fire, but the family escapes through a sinkhole and flees to Alaska.

As he arrives at Springfield to do so, a helicopter lowers a bomb suspended by rope through a hole in the dome. Homer climbs to the peak of the dome and descends the rope, knocking the escaping townspeople and bomb off. Homer grabs the bomb and a motorcycle. After reuniting with Bart, they cycle up the side of the dome and Bart tosses the bomb through the hole, seconds before detonation. The bomb explodes, shattering the dome. The town praises Homer, who rides off with Marge on the motorcycle into the sunset. The townspeople begin restoring Springfield back to normal.

Monsters Inc

  • Directors: Peter Docter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, David Silverman
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Associate Producer, Kori Rae
  • Writers: Story, Jill Culton, Peter Docter, Ralph Eggleston, Jeff Pidgeon, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson, Additional Screenplay, Robert L Baird, Rhett Reese, Jonathan Roberts
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: John Goodman, Billy Crystal, Steve Buscemi, James Coburn, Jennifer Tilly

Monsters, Inc. is the city of Monstropolis’ power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its many monster employees, skilled in scare techniques, to human children’s bedrooms around the world at their local bedtime to scare them, through individually-loaded and activated teleportation doors set up on the “scare floor”, each of which precisely matches a closet door in the individual child’s bedroom. The screams of the suddenly-awakened tots, captured through the portals, generate electric power for the monster world. It is understood, however, that the children themselves are toxic, and the company goes to great lengths to prevent contact with them; should a monster be touched by a child, or simply their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is immediately alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it increasingly difficult to harvest enough scream to meet the power demands of Monstropolis, as their energy crisis looms.

One evening, James P. Sullivan (“Sulley”), Monsters, Inc.’s top scarer, finds a loaded door on the scare floor after hours – in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child’s room appears empty, but Sulley finds to his horror that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-scarer, emerges from the child’s room and surreptitiously returns her door to an unseen door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of his work-partner and pal Mike Wazowski, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley’s home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to unusually high levels. Sulley nicknames the child “Boo” and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.

Near the end of the credits, it humorously states: “No monsters were used in the making of this film.”