This Side of the Truth

  • Directors: Ricky Gervais, Matthew Robinson
  • Producers: Ricky Gervais, Dan Lin, Lynda Obst, Oly Obst
  • Writers: Ricky Gervais, Matthew Robinson
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Ricky Gervais, Jennifer Garner, Jonah Hill, Louis C K, Christopher Guest, Rob Lowe, Tina Fey

The film is set in an alternate reality in which there is no such thing as lying, and everything said is the absolute truth. In this world, people continually make very blunt and often cruel statements and remarks that people in the real world would normally keep to themselves. The concepts of fiction, imagination, and speculation do not exist, resulting in the movie industry being limited to lecture-style historical readings, television commercials being straightforward, and an absence of religion.

Mark Bellison is an unsuccessful lecture-film writer, who is cursed with writing for the 14th century, a “very boring” era to write about. One night, he goes out on a date with Anna McDoogles. She bluntly states to Mark that she is not attracted to him due to his looks and unsuccessful financial situation, but is going out with him to satisfy her extremely prejudicial mother. After the date, she admits that she had a better time than she thought she would.

The next day Mark is fired from his job and his landlord evicts him for being short on his $800 rent. Depressed, he goes to the bank to close his account and use his remaining money to move out of his apartment. The teller informs him that the computers are down, but since society is one of full disclosure, she asks Mark how much money he has in his account. Mark has an epiphany, and tells the world’s first lie, that he has $800 in his account. The computer comes back online and shows his balance is $300, but the teller gives him the full $800 anyway, assuming that the computer made a mistake.

Years later, Anna and Mark are married with a son, with another child on the way, and their son has inherited Mark’s ability to lie.

This Is Spinal Tap

  • Directors: Rob Reiner
  • Producers: Karen Murphy
  • Writers: Christopher Guest, Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner
  • Genres: Comedy, Music
  • Actors: Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, Fran Drescher, Bruno Kirby

The movie has the style of a documentary filmed and directed by the fictional Marty DiBergi (Rob Reiner). The documentary covers a 1982 United States concert tour for the fictional British rock group “Spinal Tap” to promote their new album Smell the Glove, but interspersed with one-on-one interviews with the members of the group and footage of the group from previous points in their career.

The band was started by childhood friends David St. Hubbins (Michael McKean) and Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest) during the 1960s. Originally called “The Originals”, then “The New Originals” to distinguish themselves from the existing group of the same name, they settled on the name “The Thamesmen”, finding success with their skiffle/R&B success, “Gimme Some Money”. They changed their name again to “Spinal Tap” and enjoyed limited success with the flower power anthem, “Listen to the Flower People”. Ultimately, the band found their long success in heavy metal and produced several albums. The group was eventually joined by bassist Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer), keyboardist Viv Savage (David Kaff), and a series of drummers, each of whom had mysteriously died under odd circumstances, including spontaneous combustion, a “bizarre gardening accident” and, in at least one case, choking to death on the vomit of person(s) unknown (“you can’t dust for vomit”). DiBergi’s interviews with St. Hubbins and Tufnel reveal that they are competent composers and musicians, but are dimwitted and immature. Tufnel, in showing his guitar collection to DiBergi, reveals an amplifier that has a volume knob that goes to eleven; when DiBergi asks, “Why not just make 10 louder and make that the top?” Tufnel can only reply, “These go to 11.” Tufnel later plays a somber classical music composition for DiBergi, which he says is called “Lick My Love Pump”.

At the last show of the tour, as the group considers venturing into a musical theater production on the theme of Jack the Ripper, Tufnel returns and informs them that while their American reception has ended, the group is wildly popular in Japan, and that Faith would like to arrange a new tour in that country. The group likes the idea, letting Tufnel back into the band for their final performance. Despite losing their drummer Mick Shrimpton (R.J. Parnell) as he explodes on stage, Spinal Tap ends up enjoying great success on their Japanese tour.

The Princess Bride

  • Directors: Rob Reiner
  • Producers: Rob Reiner, Andrew Scheinman, Norman Lear for Act III Communications
  • Writers: William Goldman
  • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Fantasy, Romance
  • Actors: Cary Elwes, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon, Christopher Guest, Peter Falk, Fred Savage, Wallace Shawn, Billy Crystal, Carol Kane

The narrative of the movie is framed by a scene featuring a boy sick in bed (Fred Savage) and his grandfather (Peter Falk). The plot of the movie is the enactment of the story as it is being read, which is occasionally interrupted by comments from the grandson and grandfather.

A beautiful young woman named Buttercup (Robin Wright) lives on a farm in the fictional country of Florin. She delights in ordering the farm hand Westley (Cary Elwes) to perform chores for her. Westley’s only answer is “As you wish.” Eventually Buttercup realizes he really means “I love you”, and she admits her love for him. Westley soon leaves to seek his fortune so that they can marry. She receives word that Westley’s ship was attacked by the Dread Pirate Roberts, who is notorious for leaving no victim alive. Five years later, believing Westley to be dead, Buttercup reluctantly gets engaged to Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon), heir to the throne of Florin.

Before the wedding, Buttercup is kidnapped by a trio of outlaws: a Sicilian criminal genius named Vizzini (Wallace Shawn), a Spanish fencing master named Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin), and a gigantic Turkish wrestler named Fezzik (André the Giant). They are pursued by two parties: one consists of Prince Humperdinck and a number of soldiers; the other, a single masked man in black. The man in black outpaces the royal rescue party and almost catches the outlaws at the Cliffs of Insanity.

Upon finishing the story, the grandfather gets up to leave. The grandson—having grown more interested throughout—asks his grandfather to read it to him again the following day. The grandfather replies, “As you wish.”

Night at the Museum Battle of the Smithsonian

  • Directors: Shawn Levy
  • Producers: Shawn Levy, Chris Columbus, Michael Barnathan
  • Writers: Milan Trenc, Robert Ben Garant, Thomas Lennon
  • Genres: Action, Comedy
  • Actors: Ben Stiller, Amy Adams, Owen Wilson, Hank Azaria, Christopher Guest, Alain Chabat, and Robin Williams

When the Museum of Natural History is closed for upgrades and renovations, the museum pieces are moved into federal storage at the famous Washington Museums. The centrepiece of the film will be bringing to life the Smithsonian Institution, which houses the world’s largest museum complex with more than 136 million items in its collections, ranging from the plane Amelia Earhart (Amy Adams) flew on her non-stop solo flight across the Atlantic and Al Capone’s (Jon Bernthal) rap sheet and mug shot to Dorothy’s ruby red slippers, Fonzie’s jacket from Happy Days, the still from M*A*S*H and Archie Bunker’s lounge chair from All in the Family. An evil Pharaoh will come to life. Also featuring Darth Vader [1]