The Mask of Zorro

  • Directors: Martin Campbell
  • Producers: David Foster, Doug Claybourne, Executive Producers, Steven Spielberg, Walter F Parkes
  • Writers: Screenplay, John Eskow, Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, Story, Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, Randall Jahnson, Characters, Johnston McCulley
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Romance, Western
  • Actors: Antonio Banderas, Anthony Hopkins, Catherine Zeta Jones, Stuart Wilson, Matt Letscher

In 1821, the Mexican Army is on the verge of liberating its country from Spanish colonial rule. In Las Californias the ruthless Spanish Governor, Don Rafael Montero, is about to be overthrown. In a final effort to trap his nemesis, the masked swordsman Zorro (Anthony Hopkins), Montero prepares to execute three innocent townspeople. With assistance from two orphan brothers, Joaquin and Alejandro Murrieta, Zorro releases the prisoners. Zorro rewards the Murrieta brothers with a medallion he wears, and escapes on his horse, Toronado, after cutting a “Z” into Montero’s neck as a warning.

Montero deduces that Zorro is really Don Diego de la Vega, a Spanish nobleman married to Esperanza, the woman Montero loved. Attempting to arrest Diego, a fight ensues. Esperanza is killed while trying to protect Diego. Diego’s house is burned and his infant daughter, Eléna, is taken by Montero to be raised as his own. Diego is imprisoned.

Twenty years later Montero returns to California, looking for Diego in the old prison. Although de La Vega is there, Montero does not recognize him, while several prisoners claim to be Zorro. Diego escapes, intent on killing Montero at a public ceremony for Montero’s return. Diego restrains himself when he sees Eléna (Catherine Zeta-Jones), now a beautiful young lady. Eléna is presented with a bouquet of flowers – Romagnas, native to California – the scent of which she recognizes, although she believes she has never been to California.

The one moment that captured all the advertising and viewer’s attention: When Eléna (Catherine Zeta-Jones) is undressed by the slashing sword of Mexican thief Alejandro Murrieta/Zorro (Antonio Banderas); the view of her opened dress caused his sword blade to pop up, followed by his taking her for a sensuous kiss.[1][2] The scene has been called one of the most erotic film moments of the 1990s.[3][4] In fact, both Catherine Zeta-Jones and Antonio Banderas have admitted to sexual arousal during the filming of this scene,[5] Banderas being aroused by Zeta-Jones’s beauty,[5] and Zeta-Jones being aroused by the very fact that Banderas could strip her by using only his sword and not his hands.[5]

Once Upon a Time in Mexico

  • Directors: Robert Rodriguez
  • Producers: Robert Rodriguez, Elizabeth Avellan, Carlos Gallardo
  • Writers: Robert Rodriguez
  • Genres: Action, Comedy, Drama, Thriller, Western
  • Actors: Antonio Banderas, Salma Hayek, Johnny Depp, Mickey Rourke, Eva Mendes, Danny Trejo, Enrique Iglesias, Marco Leonardi, Cheech Marin, Julio Oscar Mechoso, Tito Larriva, and Willem Dafoe

The plot centers on El Mariachi (Banderas), who is recruited by CIA Agent Sands (Depp) to kill General Marquez. Marquez had murdered El Mariachi’s wife Carolina (Hayek) and child and has been hired by Mexican drug lord Armando Barillo to assassinate the Mexican President. Sands wants El Mariachi to kill Marquez after Marquez has killed the President. Sands recruits retired FBI Agent Jorge Ramirez to kill Barillo, as Barillo had been responsible for the death of Ramirez’s partner, Agent Archuleta. Sands also hires AFN Agent Ajedrez to tail Barillo.

As the plot unfolds, Cucuy and informants begin to turn on El Mariachi and Sands. On the day of the coup against the President, Sands is captured, tortured, and blinded; his eyes having been drilled out by his captors after Ajedrez reveals herself to be Barillo’s daughter. With the help of a young gum-selling boy, however, he manages to exact his revenge. Meanwhile, El Mariachi recruits his two friends, Lorenzo and Fideo, to assist him in rescuing the President. Much like Quino and Campa from Desperado, Lorenzo and Fideo also wield weapon guitar cases; in this case, Lorenzo wields a flame thrower, while Fideo has an RC Remote Bomb, which are able to destroy heavy armored vehicles. El Mariachi kills Marquez by shooting both his kneecaps and then shooting him in the head, avenging his lost wife and daughter, and goes on to assist Ramirez in killing Barillo – who falls off a balcony when El Mariachi shoots him with a lupara.

The movie ends with El Mariachi walking on a desert road into the sunset.

Shrek Forever After

  • Directors: Mike Mitchell
  • Producers: Gina Shay, Teresa Cheng, Executive Producer, Aron Warner, Andrew Adamson
  • Writers: Tim Sullivan, Josh Klausner, Darren Lemke, Book, William Steig
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas, Walt Dohrn, Julie Andrews, Eric Idle, Justin Timberlake

Shrek (Mike Myers) has become a domesticated family man. Instead of scaring villagers away like he used to, the grown-reluctant ogre agrees to autograph pitch forks. Longing for the days when he felt like a “real ogre”, Shrek is tricked into signing a pact with the smooth-talking dealmaker, Rumpelstiltskin. Shrek suddenly finds himself in a twisted, alternate version of Far Far Away, where ogres are hunted, Rumplestiltskin is king, the now intellectual Donkey (Eddie Murphy) is afraid of Shrek, Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) is obese, Lord Farquaad (John Lithgow) is still alive, and Shrek and Fiona (Cameron Diaz) have never met. Now, it’s up to Shrek to undo all of Rumpelstiltskin’s mischief in the hopes of saving his friends, restoring his world, and reclaiming his One True Love and family.

Shrek 2

  • Directors: Andrew Adamson, Kelly Asbury, Conrad Vernon
  • Producers: Aron Warner, John H Williams
  • Writers: Screenplay, Andrew Adamson, Joe Stillman, J David Stem, David N Weiss, Story, Andrew Adamson, Book, William Steig
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas, Julie Andrews, John Cleese, Rupert Everett, Jennifer Saunders

When Shrek (voiced by Mike Myers) and Fiona (voiced by Cameron Diaz) come back from their honeymoon, they find an invitation to a royal ball with Fiona’s parents to celebrate their marriage, an event Shrek is reluctant to participate in. Fiona talks him into it, and along with Donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy), they travel to the kingdom of Far Far Away. They meet Fiona’s parents, King Harold and Queen Lillian (voiced by John Cleese and Julie Andrews), who are surprised and repulsed by Fiona’s choice of husband (particularly the King himself), since they had arranged that Prince Charming rescue her from the castle but now they see that her husband is an ogre.

At a shared meal, Shrek and Harold get into a heated argument over how Shrek and Fiona will raise their family, and Fiona, disgusted at Shrek and her father’s behavior, locks herself away in her room that evening, where she meets her Fairy Godmother (voiced by Jennifer Saunders), who is also surprised at Fiona’s new looks. Shrek worries that he has lost his true love, particularly after finding her childhood diary and reading that she was once infatuated with Prince Charming (voiced by Rupert Everett).

As the clock strikes midnight, Shrek and Fiona let the potion’s effects wear off and they revert to their ogre selves, while Donkey changes back as well. Harold gives his blessing to the marriage and apologizes for his earlier behavior, and the party resumes as the credits begin. They are interrupted by a brief after-party scene in which the Dragon, who had romanced Donkey in the first film, arrives and reveals that they now have several dragon-donkey hybrid, or “Dronkey”, babies.

Thick as Thieves

  • Directors: Mimi Leder
  • Producers: Boaz Davidson, Lori McCreary, Danny Lerner, Les Weldon, Randall Emmett
  • Writers: Ted Humphrey
  • Genres: Crime
  • Actors: Morgan Freeman, Antonio Banderas, Radha Mitchell

Set in New York City, a veteran thief recruits a younger crook to help him pull off one final job in order to repay his debt to the Russian mob. It turns out that the younger crook was actually a Miami cop on loan to the NYPD, and was looking to bring the veteran thief to justice by being an undercover thief. The cop gets involved in a relationship with the veteran thief’s goddaughter when he starts to work with him. When they get around to pulling the final job, a Russian mobster kidnaps the goddaughter and demands two Fabergé eggs to be stolen in return. When the duo get into the vaults of the museum with the eggs, the cop takes the eggs and runs to the Russian mobster to get his lover back. In the end though, the mobster was a good friend of the veteran thief and they set up the cop (it turned out they knew he was a cop) to take the eggs from one and give it to the other. The movie ends when the mobster and veteran thief look for a buyer and the cop decides to move to the thief life as his police career is over. The cop also gets back together with his lover, who turns out to be the Russian mobster’s daughter.[3]

Interview with the Vampire The Vampire Chronicles

  • Directors: Neil Jordan
  • Producers: David Geffen, Stephen Woolley
  • Writers: Anne Rice
  • Genres: Horror
  • Actors: Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Christian Slater, Antonio Banderas, Kirsten Dunst

The film opens in present day San Francisco, where reporter Daniel Malloy (Christian Slater), is sitting in a room with a man named Louis (Brad Pitt), who claims to be a vampire. Malloy is unconvinced until Louis turns on the light and instantly appears in front of him, moving extremely fast. He agrees to interview Louis, who recalls his previous life and his life as a vampire.

It is 1791, and Louis is struggling to cope with the loss of his wife and child, not caring if he lives or dies. The vampire Lestat (Tom Cruise) attacks him but also offers him a chance to be reborn. Louis decides to take him up on the offer and Lestat proceeds to transform him into a vampire. Lestat begins showing Louis how to live the life of a vampire: sleeping in coffins by day and preying on unsuspecting mortals by night. Louis is not comfortable bringing harm to humans, however, and opts for feeding on animals instead, defying all of Lestat’s attempts to turn Louis to the vampire lifestyle. A despondent Louis finally succumbs and bites his faithful housemaid (Thandie Newton), killing her. He then burns down his estate, intending to perish in the flames, but Lestat rescues him and the two now-homeless vampires flee.

At this point Louis concludes the interview, which Malloy, the interviewer, cannot accept. He asks Louis to transform him so he can see what is truly like to be a vampire, but Louis throttles him in a fit of rage, nearly killing him, and vanishes. Malloy hurriedly runs to his car and drives away, feeling happy with his interview as he plays it through the cassette player. Just then, Lestat, who had apparently been hiding in the back seat, attacks him and takes control of the car. Revived by Malloy’s blood, he then offers a dying Malloy “the choice I never had” as they drive off into the San Francisco night, taking out the cassette and turning on the radio, which is playing “Sympathy for the Devil.”

Spy Kids 3 D Game Over

  • Directors: Robert Rodriguez
  • Producers: Robert Rodriguez, Elizabeth Avellan, Harvey Weinstein, Bob Weinstein
  • Writers: Robert Rodriguez
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Alexa Vega, Daryl Sabara, Antonio Banderas, Carla Gugino, Sylvester Stallone, George Clooney, Selena Gomez

Before the movie begins, Fegan Floop (Alan Cumming) reminds the audience the safety of the movie in 3-D and urges them to take off their 3-D glasses immediately and put them on when instructed, and the movie begins.

Juni Cortez, ex-agent for the O.S.S., gets called in to help when his sister, Carmen, is in trouble. She had gone into the new video game, Game Over, to shut it down before the Toymaker, creator of the game, could use it to control the minds of the kids who played it. When he arrives in the game, Juni has a rough time of it, losing most of the precious time he needed to shut down the game. He meets three beta-testers – Rez, Francis, and Arnold – who, when asked to help him get to Level 2, send him instead to the moon, and Robo Con, where they believe he’ll get a “Game Over”.

Once on the moon, Juni receives a life line from the O.S.S. He gets to pick someone to come into the game to help him. Eagerly, he chooses his grandfather, who had been hunting the Toymaker. After receiving “Mega Legs”, his grandfather disappears, saying he’ll catch up to Juni later. Meanwhile, it is revealed that the Toymaker was the one holding Carmen hostage in the game.

Back in the real world, Rez, Francis and Arnold are tracked down, and turn out to be nothing like they were in the game. Juni’s grandfather admits to letting the Toymaker out of the game, and he wreaks havoc with monsters from his game that can only be seen with the glasses used to enter the game. Everyone arrives to help take down the monsters. Juni’s grandfather confronts the Toymaker, and reveals that he had only been looking for him so he could forgive him for putting him in the wheelchair. The Toymaker surrenders, and becomes part of the Cortez Clan.

Spy Kids

  • Directors: Robert Rodriguez
  • Producers: Elizabeth Avellan, Robert Rodriguez
  • Writers: Robert Rodriguez
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Antonio Banderas, Carla Gugino, Alan Cumming, Teri Hatcher, Cheech Marin, Danny Trejo, with Robert Patrick, and Tony Shalhoub, Alexa Vega, as Carmen, Daryl Sabara, as Juni, George Clooney

Carmen and Juni Cortez live with what they think are boring parents. One night, Carmen asks her mother Ingrid to tell her a story, and with Juni listening, Ingrid recounts the tale of two spies, who though they are on opposing sides and originally supposed to kill each other, end up falling in love and getting married instead. What Carmen and Juni don’t know is that this is the true story of their parents Gregorio and Ingrid. The newly married couple makes a big decision. They retire from the OSS (Official Strategic Service), the spy organization they were working for, to raise their family.

Ten years later, the family is facing some problems. Carmen enjoys tormenting her younger brother, who does not have many friends. In fact, the only enjoyment in his life comes from watching “Floop’s Fooglies”, a children’s TV show starring a man named Fegan Floop, his sidekick Alexander Minion, and strange, humanoid Fooglies that speak in gibberish. Ingrid longs to return to spy work, while Gregorio just wants everyone to be happy.

Trouble begins when Gregorio is called in on a mission to locate some OSS Agents that have gone missing. The latest disappearance was that of Donnagon Giggles, an old fellow agent. The next morning, as Juni watches Floop’s show, the strange host introduces a new Fooglie character- “Donnamight.” Gregorio and Ingrid become suspicious when they realize that the strange character resembles Donnagon. The camera reveals that Floop is actually working for a villain named Mr. Lisp, and was paid quite a lot of money to develop an army to take over the world. Lisp is unhappy with the Fooglies, and is prepared to cut all funding for the project. Floop and Minion quickly present their latest idea – the Spy Kids, child-sized robots that have the athletic prowess and intelligence of the world’s best spies. Unfortunately, the robots are currently brainless- but Floop does have a plan…

Floop realizes that the Third Brain has already been copied and ingrained into every Spy Kid’s head, and runs off to try to reverse the process before they can leave the castle. The Cortez’s team up in the main room and prepare to fight Lisp, Gradenko (with burnt hair from the last encounter with Juni and Carmen), and even Minion, who now has four heads and three hands on each arm. Minion summons the Spy Kids, and the family prepares to fight, even Machete, who appears at the last minute to provide support. Floop is suddenly struck with inspiration thanks to Juni’s words. The Spy Kids are programmed to do only evil deeds… so he changes their understanding of right and wrong. The newly happy robots play by tossing Minion, Lisp, and unfortunately Gradenko into the air, and, after watching, the whole family returns home. In the end, Floop uses the Carmen and Juni robots on his show, which prove to be just what it needs, and the chief of the OSS, Devlin (George Clooney in an obvious cameo), summons Carmen and Juni to another mission. The final quote of the story is “Spywork, that’s easy. Keeping a family together, that’s difficult. And that’s the mission worth fighting for.”

Shrek the Third

  • Directors: Chris Miller, Raman Hui
  • Producers: Aron Warner
  • Writers: Screenplay, Jeffrey Price, Peter S Seaman, Chris Miller, Aron Warner, Story, Andrew Adamson, Book, William Steig
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy, Music
  • Actors: Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas, Rupert Everett, Julie Andrews, Eric Idle, John Cleese, Justin Timberlake

King Harold (voiced by John Cleese) falls ill and his ogre son-in-law Shrek (voiced by Mike Myers) and daughter Princess Fiona (voiced by Cameron Diaz) are next in line to be King and Queen of Far Far Away. Shrek declines, insisting that an ogre as king is a bad idea and that there has to be someone else for the job. With his final few breaths, the king tells Shrek that there is one other heir who can become the new King of Far Far Away: his nephew, Arthur Pendragon (voiced by Justin Timberlake). After a mournful funeral, Shrek sets out on a quest to bring back the new king, along with Donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy) and Puss in Boots (voiced Antonio Banderas). As they’re sailing off, Fiona runs to the dock and announces to Shrek that she is pregnant and he is going to be a father. Shocked, Shrek begins to have nightmares about his future children on the journey to find Arthur.

The trio’s journey soon leads them to Worcestershire Academy, an elite boarding school, where they discover that Arthur (“Artie”, as he prefers to be called) is a scrawny 16-year old underachiever picked on by virtually everyone, from the cool kids down to the retainer wearing Dungeons and Dragons geeks. Far removed from the courageous legend his name evokes, Artie stands literally at the bottom of the high school food chain. He is constantly showered with insults, used as a punching bag by the school Jousting Team, led by the obnoxious Lancelot du Lac (voiced by John Krasinski), and cruelly scorned by Guinevere (Latifa Ouaou), the girl he had always loved.

As Far Far Away is left in the capable hands of young Artie, the move ends as Shrek retires with Fiona to their swamp a few months later, becoming the parents of ogre triplets.