Brooklyn s Finest

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Basil Iwanyk, John Langley, John Thompson, Elie Cohn
  • Writers: Michael C Martin
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Drama
  • Actors: Richard Gere, Don Cheadle, Ethan Hawke, and Wesley Snipes

The film takes place within the notoriously rough Brownsville section of Brooklyn and especially within the Van Dyke housing projects in the NYPD’s sixty-fifth precinct. Three policemen struggle with the sometimes fine line between right and wrong.

The opening scene shows two men sitting in a parked car having a conversation, the man in the drivers seat, Carlo (Vincent D’Onofrio) is then shot unexpectedly in the face by the passenger (revealed to be Sal) who then robs Carlo and runs off.

Detective Salvatore “Sal” Procida (Ethan Hawke), desperate for money to feed and house his rapidly growing family, has started pocketing the money left on the table during drug raids. Deeply religious, he finds that he’s in the bad place of trying to reconcile his misdeeds with his needs. The mold in the walls of his home is making his wife (Lili Taylor) ill and endangering the life of his unborn twins. And the down payment on his coveted new, bigger house is past due.

Officer Eddie Dugan (Richard Gere) is a week from retirement after twenty-two years of less-than-exemplary service to the force when he’s assigned to oversee rookies in the tough neighborhoods. His life in shambles, Eddie is barely hanging on, swilling whiskey in the morning to get out of bed. His only friend is the prostitute he frequents.

The closing scene shows Eddie having rescued the missing person, and an assortment of other women, and in the process having redeemed himself from the reputation he earned within the precinct of being a failure as an officer.

Training Day

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Bruce Berman and Davis Guggenheim
  • Writers: David Ayer
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Thriller
  • Actors: Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke

The film follows a single day in the life of a young LAPD cop Jake Hoyt (Hawke) as he is subject to an evaluation by Detective Alonzo Harris (Washington), a highly decorated LAPD narcotics officer who could put him on the path for rapid career advancement.

After meeting in a diner, Jake rides with Alonzo in his car, a black 1979 Chevrolet Monte Carlo lowrider, during the day. From the first few moments of their interaction, it becomes quickly apparent that Jake’s belief in the system is in stark contrast to Alonzo’s philosophy of blending in with “the real world” without regard for the rules. They first detain some college students buying marijuana from a dealer, but instead of arresting them they confiscate the drugs. Alonzo offers Jake a hit from the marijuana which Jake initially refuses. Alonzo threatens him and states that a drug dealer would have killed him for refusing. Jake stands fast, but Alonzo puts a gun to his head and threatens to throw him out of the car. Jake relents and takes the hit, but quickly discovers that the marijuana was laced with PCP.

Alonzo then takes Jake to the home of a man named Roger (Scott Glenn) for an apparent social call. After leaving Roger’s, Jake notices a female high school student being attacked by two men in a side alley. He demands Alonzo to pull over as he jumps out to save her. Alonzo watches, but doesn’t intervene. Jake wants to process the men and the girl, but Alonzo dismisses her and leaves the two men out on the street, saying the girl’s cousin (a gang member) will take care of her attackers. Jake denounces this as street justice, but Alonzo tells him that as a narcotics detective he is focused on shutting down major drug operations, not stopping individual crimes. Jake discovers the girl’s wallet and takes it with him.

In his desperate escape to LAX, Alonzo is surrounded at a quiet intersection by a crew of Russian hitmen who spray his car with machine gun fire. The final scene has Jake pulling into his driveway and going home to his wife, Lisa (Charlotte Ayanna), and daughter, while a radio broadcast reports Alonzo’s death — describing it as occurring honorably ‘in the line of duty.’

Shooter

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Lorenzo di Bonaventura
  • Writers: Stephen Hunter, Jonathan Lemkin
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Mark Wahlberg, Danny Glover, Ned Beatty, Tate Donovan, Kate Mara, Mike Dopud

Bob Lee Swagger (Mark Wahlberg), a retired Gunnery Sergeant Marine Scout Sniper, is one of the few snipers in the world whose sharpshooting abilities allow him to “take out a target from a mile away.” He reluctantly leaves a self-imposed exile from his isolated mountain home at the request of Colonel Isaac Johnson (Danny Glover). Johnson appeals to his expertise and patriotism to help track down an assassin who plans on shooting the president from a great distance with a high powered rifle. Johnson gives him a list of three cities where the President is scheduled to visit so Swagger could determine if an attempt could be made at any of them.

Swagger assesses each of the locations and determines that a site in Philadelphia would be most conducive to a long range assassination attempt. He passes this information to Johnson, who purportedly arranges for a response. This turns out to be a set-up: while Swagger is working with Johnson’s agents — including a local police officer — to find the rumored assassin, the Ethiopian archbishop is instead assassinated while standing next to the president. Swagger is shot by the officer, but manages to escape. The agents tell the police and public that Swagger is the shooter, and stage a massive manhunt for the injured sniper. However, Swagger has a stroke of luck — he meets a rookie FBI special agent, Nick Memphis (Michael Peña), disarms him and steals his car.

Later appearing in a closed meeting with the Director of the FBI and the United States Attorney General present, Swagger clears his name by loading a rifle round (supplied by Memphis) into his rifle (which is there as evidence since it was supposedly used in the killing), aiming it at the Colonel and pulling the trigger — which fails to fire the round. Swagger explains that every time he leaves his house, he takes out all the firing pins replacing them with slightly shorter ones, thus rendering them unable to fire until he returns. Although Swagger is exonerated, Colonel Johnson takes advantage of a legal loophole — the Ethiopian genocide is outside American legal jurisdiction — and walks free. The attorney general approaches Swagger and states that as a law enforcement official, he must abide by the law (he insinuates that if it was the “wild west” it would be appropriate to clean the system with a gun). Afterwards, the Colonel and the Senator plan their next move while at the Senator’s vacation house — only to be interrupted by an attack by Swagger. He kills both conspirators, one of the Colonel’s aides and two bodyguards, then breaks open a gas valve before leaving. The fire in the fireplace ignites the gas, blowing up the house. The final scene shows Swagger getting into a car with Fenn and driving away.

King Arthur

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Jerry Bruckheimer
  • Writers: David Franzoni
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, History, War
  • Actors: Clive Owen, Keira Knightley, Ioan Gruffudd, Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Edgerton, Ray Winstone, Stephen Dillane, Til Schweiger

Arthur, also known as Artorius Castus (Clive Owen), is portrayed as a Roman cavalry officer, the son of a Roman father and a Celtic mother, who leads a military force of Sarmatian auxiliary cavalry in Britain at the close of the Roman occupation in 467 A.D. He and his men guard Hadrian’s Wall against the Woads, a Celtic people who resist Roman rule, based on the historical Picts,[2] led by the mysterious Merlin. He is not the first Arthur â€” for generations, his ancestors have manned the Wall, leading Sarmatian auxiliaries.

As the film starts, Arthur and his remaining knights Lancelot (whose voiceover is heard at the beginning and end), Bors, Tristan, Gawain, Galahad and Dagonet – are expecting discharge from the service of the Empire after faithfully serving for 15 years (Lancelot’s entry into service as a youth in 452 A.D. is depicted at the very beginning of the film). However, on the night they ought to receive their freedom, they are dispatched on a final and possibly suicidal mission by Bishop Germanius in the freezing winter to rescue the important Roman family of Marius Honorius, his wife, and their son, Alecto, who is the Pope’s favorite “godson” (and, according to Bishop Germanius, may be “destined to be Pope one day”), from impending capture by the invading Saxons, who are led by their chief Cerdic and his son Cynric. The knights are charged with this rescue because Rome is withdrawing from Britain, it now being considered an indefensible outpost.

The film ends with Arthur and Guinevere’s marriage. Merlin then proclaims him to be their king. King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, and his remaining knights promise to lead the Britons, united with the defeat of the Saxons and retreat of the Romans, against future invaders. The last scene shows Lancelot, Dagonet and Tristan reincarnated as horses and roaming the lands freely, while Lancelot speaks of the fact that their names will live forever in legend.