Toy Story 3

  • Directors: Lee Unkrich
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter
  • Writers: Screenplay, Michael Arndt, Treatment, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, John Ratzenberger, Wallace Shawn, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, Ned Beatty, Michael Keaton, Jodi Benson, Blake Clark, Timothy Dalton, John Morris, Laurie Metcalf, Bonnie Hunt, Jeff Garlin, Whoopi Goldberg, Kristen Schaal

Andy is departing for college, and his toys, including Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz and (Tim Allen), are going to be put in the attic. Before they can be put in the attic, they are accidentally thrown away and are picked up by the garbage men. The toys find themselves at a local day-care center, where they must try to survive the playful but careless pre-school children. Woody attempts to save his friends and find themselves a new home, but matters are further complicated when Buzz is damaged during an escape attempt. The toys try to reset Buzz, but end up causing him to revert to a Spanish version of his delusions of being a space ranger, much to Jessie’s delight and the other toys’ discomfort.[2][3]

A Bug s Life

  • Directors: John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, John Lasseter
  • Writers: Story, Joe Ranft, Additional Story, Gefwee Boedoe, Jason Katz, Jorgen Klubien, Robert Lence, David Reynolds Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Don McEnery, Bob Shaw
  • Genres: Family, Animation, Comedy, Adventure
  • Actors: Dave Foley, Kevin Spacey, Julia Louis Dreyfus, Denis Leary, Phyllis Diller, Joe Ranft, David Hyde Pierce, Brad Garrett, Richard Kind, Bonnie Hunt, Jonathan Harris, Hayden Panettiere, Madeline Kahn, Roddy McDowall, Michael McShane, John Ratzenberger, Ashley Tisdale

A colony of ants on a small island are working to gather enough food to satisfy the extortion demands of a gang of tough grasshoppers who visit every growing season. One ant, Flik, is an inventor whose creations usually do more harm than good. While trying out a mechanical harvester, he accidentally knocks the pile of food into a stream just before the grasshoppers arrive. Their leader, Hopper, gives the ants the rest of the season to make good on what they owe, but orders a double ration of food after Flik stands up to him in defense of the Queen’s younger daughter, Dot. Flik is called before the colony’s royal council and admonished severely for his actions. Princess Atta, Dot’s older sister and the eventual successor of the current queen, is unsure about how to deal with him. When Flik suggests that he might try to recruit some “warrior bugs” to fight the grasshoppers, the council sees this idea as a chance to get him removed and enthusiastically approves. Reaching the insect “city,” built from discarded boxes and cans, Flik encounters a troupe of unemployed circus bugs whose latest performance has just ended in disaster. He mistakes them for the warriors he needs; at the same time; they believe him to be a talent scout who wants to book their act on the island. They return to the colony, much to Atta’s surprise, and are immediately greeted as heroes who can put an end to the threat posed by Hopper’s gang. Atta soon becomes suspicious after almost overhearing a conversation in which both Flik and the troupe realize their mistakes. However, after they band together to save Dot from a hungry bird, she begins to think that the troupe may be able to stop the grasshoppers after all. She also starts to fall in love with Flik.

Dot overhears the gang’s plans to kill the queen once they have all the food, and she rushes to catch up with Flik, who has left the colony with the troupe. She persuades them to return and put the bird plan into action, with help from her and some of the other young ants. The model scares the gang, and they almost retreat until P. T. intervenes and inadvertently incinerates it. Enraged, Hopper sends his crazed associate Thumper to severely injure Flik, but Flik is still able to stand up and rally the other ants, saying that the grasshoppers depend on the extorted food for their own survival. The entire colony swarms against the gang, forcing them to leave but Hopper, now obsessed with killing Flik. In his rage, he grabs Flik and flies off, evading the troupe until Atta intervenes and rescues Flik. They lure him towards the bird’s nest and get separated. Hopper finds Flik and they fight until the bird emerges. Hopper, believing this bird to be another model, taunts Flik until it picks him up and feeds him to its chicks. The ants welcome Flik back into the colony and adopt his harvester to speed up grain collection. Passing her princess crown to Dot, Atta is crowned the new queen and chooses Flik as her mate. Before the troupe can leave, they must wait for one member, Heimlich the caterpillar, to emerge from the chrysalis in which he has encased himself. He pops out with a tiny pair of butterfly wings, far too small to lift him off the ground, and the troupe (with Molt, acting as a road crew assistant) departs with the colony’s thanks.

Toy Story 2

  • Directors: John Lasseter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, Ash Brannon
  • Producers: Karen Robert Jackson, Helene Plotkin, Executive Producer, Sarah McArthur
  • Writers: Story, John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Ash Brannon, Andrew Stanton, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Rita Hsiao, Doug Chamberlain, Chris Webb, Story Supervisor, Dan Jeup, Joe Ranft
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Kelsey Grammer, Don Rickles, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Wayne Knight

Set a year after Toy Story (1995), Andy accidentally tears Woody’s arm while playing with him before leaving for cowboy camp (an annual trip he makes with Woody), leaving Woody on the shelf. Woody starts to have nightmares of becoming a disused toy, but wakes to find that Wheezy, a penguin toy that lost its squeaker, is being taken by Andy’s mother to be sold at a yard sale. Woody rescues Wheezy with the help of Andy’s dog Buster (who was mentioned at the end of the previous film as a puppy), but he is accidentally left behind at the yard sale and subsequently stolen by toy store owner Al McWhiggin. Buzz Lightyear and the other toys watch in horror, and Buzz sets up a rescue party with Mr. Potato Head, Rex, Slinky Dog and Hamm to bring Woody back.

Woody is brought to Al’s apartment, where he discovers that he is a toy created from Woody’s Roundup, a popular children’s television show from the 1950s. By acquiring him, Al now has a complete collection of the show’s merchandise, which he plans to sell to a toy museum in Japan. Woody meets the toy versions of the show’s co-stars: his sidekick Jessie, his horse Bullseye, and an old prospector named Stinky Pete formerly known as ‘The Prospector’ (who is still in his original box). These three are excited to be going to Japan. But knowing that he is Andy’s toy, Woody has doubts and tries to escape the apartment but without success. Later, Al brings over a toy repairman, who restores Woody’s arm and gives him a fresh paint job, which Woody appreciates. He slowly warms up to the idea of going to Japan, particularly after learning that Jessie was once the favorite toy of a little girl named Emily who gave her away after growing up and he realises that, if he returns to Andy, he will eventually be thrown away when he grows up, whereas if he goes to Japan, he will be remembered and treasured forever.

The toys happily return home and soon learn that, due to Al’s failure to sell the merchandise collection, his business and his mood have both declined sharply. When Andy comes home from camp, he is excited to see the new additions to his own collection, Jessie and Bullseye, believing that his mom got them for him while he was away. He repairs Woody’s arm and marks both of the others with his name, making them feel appreciated again. Buzz shows signs of attraction to Jessie after she performs a similar stunt that Buzz did in the 1st movie (his wings inadvertently extend in astonishment). Woody and Buzz now accept the fact that Andy will eventually grow up, but even after he does, they will still be there for each other. As the movie ends, a now-fixed Wheezy sings “You’ve Got a Friend in Me.”

Monsters Inc

  • Directors: Peter Docter, Co Director, Lee Unkrich, David Silverman
  • Producers: Darla K Anderson, Executive Producer, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Associate Producer, Kori Rae
  • Writers: Story, Jill Culton, Peter Docter, Ralph Eggleston, Jeff Pidgeon, Screenplay, Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson, Additional Screenplay, Robert L Baird, Rhett Reese, Jonathan Roberts
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: John Goodman, Billy Crystal, Steve Buscemi, James Coburn, Jennifer Tilly

Monsters, Inc. is the city of Monstropolis’ power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its many monster employees, skilled in scare techniques, to human children’s bedrooms around the world at their local bedtime to scare them, through individually-loaded and activated teleportation doors set up on the “scare floor”, each of which precisely matches a closet door in the individual child’s bedroom. The screams of the suddenly-awakened tots, captured through the portals, generate electric power for the monster world. It is understood, however, that the children themselves are toxic, and the company goes to great lengths to prevent contact with them; should a monster be touched by a child, or simply their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is immediately alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it increasingly difficult to harvest enough scream to meet the power demands of Monstropolis, as their energy crisis looms.

One evening, James P. Sullivan (“Sulley”), Monsters, Inc.’s top scarer, finds a loaded door on the scare floor after hours – in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child’s room appears empty, but Sulley finds to his horror that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-scarer, emerges from the child’s room and surreptitiously returns her door to an unseen door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of his work-partner and pal Mike Wazowski, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley’s home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to unusually high levels. Sulley nicknames the child “Boo” and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.

Near the end of the credits, it humorously states: “No monsters were used in the making of this film.”

WALL E

  • Directors: Andrew Stanton
  • Producers: Jim Morris, Lindsey Collins, John Lasseter
  • Writers: Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, Pete Docter
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Romance, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin, Fred Willard, John Ratzenberger, Kathy Najimy, Sigourney Weaver

In the late 21st century, Earth was governed by the Buy n Large corporation (BnL), enabling mass consumerism and covering the planet in trash by the turn of the century. In an attempt to resolve the situation, Earth’s population was sent on fully automated luxury BnL spaceliners to spend five years on a cruise in space while an army of trash compactor robots named WALL-E were left behind to clean the planet. This plan failed, however, when in 2110 the planet was deemed too toxic to ever support life again, forcing humanity to remain in space indefinitely. Some seven hundred years later, only one WALL-E unit still functions, having survived by salvaging parts for himself from his defunct brethren. This unit has developed sentience and a sense of emotion, particularly curiosity, as shown by his quirky habits, from collecting interesting items in the garbage, to domesticating a lone cockroach, to watching the film Hello, Dolly! and playing its show tunes.

One day, a spaceship lands and deploys an advanced, feminine probe robot named EVE, with whom WALL-E falls in love with first sight. EVE, on the other hand, does not think much of WALL-E at first, concerned only with fulfilling her directive of scanning for signs of plant life. When WALL-E musters the courage to introduce himself, though, EVE warms up to WALL-E and befriends him. WALL-E brings EVE to his truck for shelter during a dust storm and shows her his knickknack collection. When WALL-E shows EVE a seedling plant he found earlier, EVE stores it inside herself and deactivates. WALL-E goes to great lengths to take care of her motionless body (and even takes her out on a date) in the fruitless hope she will awaken. When her ship returns to collect her, WALL-E desperately clings to the hull of the ship as it returns to the Axiom, flagship of the human starliners.

Escaping from the garbage depot, WALL-E and EVE recruit various malfunctioning robots to aid them as they make their way to the holo-detector. The Captain, meanwhile, confronts Auto and activates the holo-detector. When Auto tries to close it, WALL-E jams his body inside to keep it open, which ultimately crushes him. Summoning the strength to stand unaided, the Captain deactivates Auto, allowing EVE to place the plant in the holo-detector and release the dying WALL-E. The Axiom makes its hyperjump to Earth and lands, whereupon EVE repairs and revives WALL-E with his spare parts. Unfortunately, his memory and personality appear to have been erased, reverting him to his original programming as an unfeeling trash compactor. Heartbroken, EVE takes WALL-E’s hand and gives him a farewell electric spark “kiss” which unexpectedly restores his memory. WALL-E and EVE happily reunite as the humans and robots place the plant in the ground, and begin working together to restore their home world.

Toy Story

  • Directors: John Lasseter, Supervising Technical Director, William Reeves
  • Producers: Bonnie Arnold, Ralph Guggenheim, Executive Producer, Ed Catmull, Steve Jobs
  • Writers: Story, John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Joe Ranft, Screenplay, Joss Whedon, Andrew Stanton, Joel Cohen amp Alec Sokolow
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Jim Varney, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Annie Potts, John Morris, Erik von Detten

Old-fashioned cowboy doll Woody is coordinating a reconnaissance mission around his owner Andy’s birthday party in the days before Andy’s family move to their new house. To Woody’s dismay, Andy receives a new action figure in the form of space ranger Buzz Lightyear, whose impressive features soon see Buzz replacing Woody as Andy’s favorite toy. Woody, the former de facto leader of Andy’s toys, is disappointed and resentful at his replacement. Meanwhile, Buzz does not understand that he is a toy, and believes himself to be an actual space ranger, seeing Woody as an interference in his ‘mission’.

Later, Woody wants to replace Buzz on a family outing. He intends to trap Buzz in a gap behind Andy’s desk, but the plan goes disastrously wrong and Buzz is knocked out the window. The other toys accuse Woody of attempting to murder Buzz out of jealousy, but are unable to punish him before Andy leaves the house with Woody for an outing at the space-themed Pizza Planet restaurant. Buzz sees Andy getting into his mother’s car with Woody and manages to climb aboard, and while Woody ponders how he can return to Andy’s room alone, Buzz confronts Woody while Andy’s mother refuels the car. The two end up fighting and accidentally land outside the car, which drives off and leaves the two stranded.

Climbing onto the removalist’s van, they attract the attention of Scud. Buzz sacrifices himself to save Woody by tackling the dog. Woody attempts to rescue Buzz with Andy’s radio-controlled car. The other toys in the moving van mistakenly believe Woody is attempting to get rid of another toy, and toss Woody onto the road with Buzz. With the toy car’s batteries depleted, Woody then realizes that he can ignite Buzz’s rocket, and all three toys make their way back to Andy safely, but not before the other toys realize their error. At Christmas, a reconciled Buzz and Woody stage another reconnaissance mission to prepare for the new toy arrivals. Both are surprised to see Andy’s biggest gift—a puppy.

Ratatouille

  • Directors: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava
  • Producers: Brad Lewis, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Galyn Susman
  • Writers: Jan Pinkava, Jim Capobianco, Brad Bird, Emily Cook, Kathy Greenberg, Bob Peterson
  • Genres: Animation, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Patton Oswalt, Lou Romano, Peter Sohn, Brad Garrett, Ian Holm, Brian Dennehy, Janeane Garofalo, Peter O Toole

Remy is an irregular rat who lives in the attic of a French country home with his brother Emile and a pack led by his father Django. Gifted with a keen sense of smell and taste, Remy aspires to be a gourmet chef, inspired by France’s recently deceased top chef, Auguste Gusteau, but instead he is put to work sniffing for rat poison. When the pack is discovered by the home’s occupant, they flee into the sewers; Remy is separated and ends up aground underneath Gusteau’s restaurant in Paris.

Led by his imagination of Gusteau, Remy goes to the kitchen skylight to watch the kitchen in action during a service. There, he observes Alfredo Linguini, the son of Gusteau’s former lover, being hired as a janitor by Skinner, the restaurant’s current owner and Gusteau’s former sous-chef. When Linguini spills some of the soup and attempts to recreate it using random ingredients, Remy is horrified and falls into the kitchen; instead of escaping, Remy attempts to correct the soup. Remy is caught by Linguini just as Linguini is caught by Skinner, but before anyone can stop the serving staff, the soup is served and found to be a success. Colette, the staff’s only female chef, convinces Skinner to retain Linguini, believing him to be the success behind the soup. Linguini takes Remy home, realizing he cannot kill him as instructed by Skinner as Remy was the “little chef” that made the soup.

Gusteau’s restaurant is closed a short time later after a health inspector discovered the rats in the kitchen. Though Ego’s reputation is tarnished on reviewing a restaurant plagued with rats, he eagerly funds a popular new bistro, “La Ratatouille”, run by Linguini and Colette, featuring diner areas for both humans and rats and a kitchen designed for Remy to continue to cook in.