Beverly Hills Cop II

  • Directors: Tony Scott
  • Producers: Don Simpson, Jerry Bruckheimer
  • Writers: Characters, Danilo Bach, Daniel Petrie Jr, Story, Eddie Murphy, Robert D Wachs, Screenplay, Larry Ferguson, Warren Skaaren, Uncredited, David Giler, Dennis Klein
  • Genres: Action, Comedy, Crime, Thriller
  • Actors: Eddie Murphy, Judge Reinhold, Jurgen Prochnow, Ronny Cox, John Ashton, Brigitte Nielsen, Allen Garfield, Dean Stockwell, Gil Hill, Gilbert Gottfried, and Paul Reiser

Approximately two years after the original film, Captain (formerly Lieutenant) Andrew Bogomil (Ronny Cox), Detective Billy Rosewood (Judge Reinhold), and Sergeant John Taggart (John Ashton) are trying to figure out who is behind the “Alphabet Crimes”, a series of mostly high end store robberies distinguished by their monogrammed envelopes with an alphabetical sequence the assailants leave behind. Complicating matters is the new “political” state of the Beverly Hills police, headed by an incompetent new police chief named Harold Lutz (Allen Garfield), who is doing everything he can to stay on Mayor Ted Egan’s (Robert Ridgely) good side. Unimpressed when Rosewood calls the FBI to help solve the case, Lutz holds Bogomil responsible as commanding officer and suspends him, despite Bogomil trying to convince him that Rosewood was only following a hunch, a traditional aspect of police work. Lutz also punishes Taggart and Rosewood by placing them on traffic duty.

On the way home, Bogomil is shot by Karla Fry (Brigitte Nielsen), the chief henchwoman of Maxwell Dent (Jürgen Prochnow). Finding out about the shooting over a news report, Axel Foley (Murphy) immediately flies out to Beverly Hills (covering his absence from his actual job in Detroit by telling his commanding officer Inspector Todd he was going “deep deep deep DEEP undercover” on the credit card fraud case he had been assigned to) to help find out who shot Bogomil to repay the favor he owes him for saving his job two years ago. Taggert and Rosewood agree to assist Axel because of Lutz’s apparent attempts to find an excuse to get them fired. Posing as an undercover FBI agent to get past Lutz (by convincing his would-be partner Jeffrey in Detroit to pose as Todd to intercept Lutz’s phone call to Todd’s office and convince Lutz that Axel is part of a multi-jurisdictional task force). Axel soon starts making the connection between the robberies and Dent, and has Bogomil’s daughter Jan use her connections as an insurance agent to find out Dent’s financial dealings. Dent is robbing his own businesses to finance firearms deals and is discreetly using his henchman Charles Cain (Dean Stockwell) as the front man for his operations. Bogomil was shot due to being on the right track with his investigation into the case.

At the end of the film Bogomil is chosen by Mayor Egan to replace Lutz as the new Chief of Police, and Axel returns back to Detroit, but not before he gets chewed out by Inspector Todd over the phone, right after Egan called him to congratulate him on allowing Axel to assist them on this case.

The Conversation

  • Directors: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Producers: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Writers: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest

Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is a paranoid surveillance expert running his own company in San Francisco, and is highly respected by others in the profession. Caul is obsessed with his own privacy; his apartment is almost bare behind its triple-locked door, he uses pay phones to make calls and claims to have no home telephone, and his office is enclosed in wire mesh in a corner of a much larger warehouse. Caul is utterly professional at work, but he finds personal contact difficult. He is exquisitely uncomfortable in dense crowds and withdrawn and taciturn in more intimate situations; he is also reticent and secretive with work colleagues. He is nondescript in appearance, except for his habit of wearing a translucent plastic raincoat virtually everywhere he goes, even when it is not raining.

Despite his insistence that his professional code means that he is not responsible for worrying about the actual content of the conversations he records or the uses to which his clients put his surveillance activities, he is, in fact, wracked by guilt over a past wiretap job that left three persons dead. His sense of guilt is sharpened by his devout Catholicism. His one hobby is playing along with his favourite jazz records on a tenor saxophone in the privacy of his apartment.

Caul’s appalled efforts to forestall tragedy ultimately fail — and, it turns out, the conversation might not mean what he thought it did, and the tragedy he anticipated isn’t the one that eventually happens. In the final scene, he discovers that his own apartment is bugged and goes on a frantic search for the listening device, tearing up the floorboards and destroying his apartment. He fails to find it. At the film’s end he is left sitting amidst the wreckage, calmly playing his saxophone.