Major League

  • Directors: David S Ward
  • Producers: James G Robinson, Joe Roth, Mark Rosenberg, Chris Chesser, Irby Smith
  • Writers: David S Ward
  • Genres: Comedy, Sport
  • Actors: Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen, Corbin Bernsen, Rene Russo, Wesley Snipes, Chelcie Ross, Dennis Haysbert, Bob Uecker, James Gammon

Rachel Phelps, a former Las Vegas showgirl, has inherited the Cleveland Indians baseball team from her deceased husband. She wants to move the team to the warmer climate of Miami. In order to do this, she must reduce attendance at Municipal Stadium below a total of 800,000 ticket sales which will trigger an escape clause in the team’s lease with the city of Cleveland. After she moves the team, she would also be able to release all the current players and replace them with new ones. She instructs her new General Manager Charlie Donovan to hire the worst team possible from a list she has already prepared. The list includes veteran catcher Jake Taylor, who has problems with his knees, and was last playing in Mexico, incarcerated pitcher Rick Vaughn, the brash but speedy center fielder Willie “Mays” Hayes (who was not invited to camp), power hitting outfielder Pedro Cerrano, who practices voodoo to try to help him hit curve balls, veteran pitcher Eddie Harris, who lacks a strong throwing arm and is forced to doctor his pitches, and third baseman Roger Dorn, who is already under contract but is a high-priced prima donna. As manager, Phelps hires Lou Brown, a tire salesman who “has managed the Toledo Mud Hens for the last 30 years”.

With two outs in the bottom of the ninth, Hayes manages to single to first and subsequently steals second. Taylor is next to bat, and after signaling back and forth with Brown, points to the bleachers, calling his shot. However, Taylor bunts instead, catching the Yankees infield off-guard. Despite his weak knees, Taylor get to the first base safely. Hayes, knowing that the infield is focused on catching Taylor at the first base, clears the third base and goes for the home, catching the Yankees off guard again. Hayes slides safe into home, giving the Indians the win. As the team celebrates, Dorn punches Vaughn in the face but then helps him up to continue the celebration, while Jake finds Lynn in the stands, who raises her left hand to show that she is no longer wearing an engagement ring, indicating that she wishes to be with him.

Cinderella Man

  • Directors: Ron Howard
  • Producers: Brian Grazer, Ron Howard, Penny Marshall
  • Writers: Cliff Hollingsworth, Akiva Goldsman
  • Genres: Biography, Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Russell Crowe, Paul Giamatti

James J. Braddock is a hard-nosed, Irish-American boxer from New Jersey, formerly a light heavyweight contender, who is forced to give up boxing after breaking his hand in the ring. This is a relief and an upset to his wife, Mae, who cannot bring herself to watch the violence of his chosen profession, and yet knows without him boxing they’ll have no good income.

As the United States enters the Great Depression, Braddock does manual labor to support his family even after badly breaking his hand. Unfortunately, he can not get work every day. Thanks to a last-minute cancellation by another boxer, Braddock’s longtime manager Joe Gould offers him a chance to fill in for just this one night and make a little money. The fight is against the number two contender in the world and Braddock is seen as little more than a convenient punching bag.

Braddock stuns the boxing experts and fans with a third-round knockout of his formidable opponent. He believes that because his hand is now healed, he is fit to fight. Against his wife’s wishes, Braddock takes up Gould’s offer to return to the ring.

Mae resents this attempt by Gould to profit off her husband’s dangerous livelihood until she discovers that Gould and his wife also have been devastated by hard times.

On June 13, 1935, in one of the biggest upsets in boxing history, Braddock defeats the seemingly invincible Baer to become the heavyweight champion of the world.

Match Point

  • Directors: Woody Allen
  • Producers: Letty Aronson, Gareth Wiley, Lucy Darwin
  • Writers: Woody Allen
  • Genres: Crime, Drama, Romance, Sport, Thriller
  • Actors: Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Scarlett Johansson, Emily Mortimer, Matthew Goode, Brian Cox, Penelope Wilton, Ewen Bremner, James Nesbitt, Rupert Penry Jones

When former tennis pro Chris Wilton begins a relationship with shy heiress Chloe Hewett after befriending her brother Tom, he finds his social and financial status vastly improved. However, once he has an affair with Tom’s ex-lover, American actress Nola Rice, he realizes that his new, luxurious lifestyle may be threatened.

Stick It

  • Directors: Jessica Bendinger
  • Producers: Gail Lyon
  • Writers: Jessica Bendinger
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Jeff Bridges, Missy Peregrym

Haley Graham (Missy Peregrym) is a rebellious 17-year-old who is forced to return to the regimented world of gymnastics after a run-in with the law. A judge sentences Haley to her ultimate nightmare, attending an elite gymnastics academy run by legendary coach Burt Vickerman (Jeff Bridges).

Haley was once considered one of the most talented gymnasts in the US. She made it to the World Championships, but she walked out of competition in the middle of the finals, costing the American team the gold medal and leaving many people hurt and crushed making her one of the most hated people in gymnastics

Haley has a talk with Coach Vickerman, who convinces her to take up the sport once again—at least until she can enter an upcoming invitational competition. Vickerman convinces her that she can use the prize money from the competition to repay some property damage debts she still owes and leave gymnastics once and for all. Disliking the sport’s rigid rules and intense training schedule, Haley is reluctant to come out of retirement. Her attitude toward her fellow gymnasts—as well as her past—causes conflicts. After getting the cold shoulder the first day at the gym, Haley realizes what she is up against.

What started out as a gymnastics competition turns into a small revolution for the rules and Haley. Her talents are recognized once more and her future seems to be set with numerous colleges offering her athletic scholarships to compete in NCAA gymnastics.

The Replacements

  • Directors: Howard Deutch
  • Producers: Dylan Sellers, Jeffrey Chernov, Steven Reuther
  • Writers: Vince McKewin
  • Genres: Comedy, Sport
  • Actors: Keanu Reeves, Gene Hackman, Brooke Langton, Jon Favreau, Orlando Jones, Brett Cullen

The film opens with Shane Falco, a former star quarterback at Ohio State University who choked in his final college game and failed to succeed in his only pro season, doing his job cleaning the bottoms of peoples’ boats. While underwater, he finds a football labeled “Shane Falco: All American” and pretends he is playing football again. Meanwhile, the fictional Washington Sentinels[1][2] are shown playing a game in which commentators John Madden and Pat Summerall mention a players’ strike taking place over salary disputes. As the game winds down, Sentinels quarterback Eddie Martel chooses to slide to the ground instead of scoring the game winning touchdown to avoid getting injured.

Later that day, the owner of the Sentinels decides to hire Jimmy McGinty, the Sentinels’ former coach who was fired after getting into a fight with the team’s star quarterback, to recruit replacement players during the strike and coach the team for the rest of the season. He tells McGinty that all they need is three wins out of their final four games to advance to the playoffs. McGinty tells the owner he’ll only do it if he promises not to interfere with his coaching style. McGinty recruits many different ragtag players, and eventually convinces Falco to come off his boat and play quarterback again. Falco soon becomes attracted to the team’s head cheerleader, Annabelle Farrell, who likes him as well, but doesn’t want to date him because of her stereotype that all pro athletes are prima donnas.

In the final game of the season, Martel has trouble connecting with the rest of the team and scolds the rest of them when he makes a mistake. At halftime, the Sentinels trail 17-0, and reporter asks McGinty what they’ll need to win the game, to which he replies “miles and miles of heart” meant as a message to Falco. Falco hears him say this and comes to the game during halftime, and the rest of the team kicks Martel out of the locker room. Falco runs onto the field at the start of the half and draws loud and thunderous applause from the fans. He apologizes to Annabelle and kisses her on national TV. Cochran is able to run for a touchdown at the beginning of the half before injuring his leg. The Sentinels then score again to cut the lead to 17-14. With only a few seconds left in the game, Falco tells McGinty he wants the ball, implying that he has gotten over his fear of choking with the game on the line. Falco throws a pass to tight end Brian Murphy for a touchdown, and the Sentinels win 20-17, advancing to the playoffs. The film ends with a voiceover from McGinty saying that when the players left the game that night, there were no endorsement deals or victory parades waiting for them, just a locker waiting to be cleaned out, but it didn’t matter, because they each got a second chance at glory, which lasts forever.

Saint Ralph

  • Directors: Michael McGowan
  • Producers: Teza Lawrence, Andrea Mann, Seaton McLean
  • Writers: Michael McGowan
  • Genres: Comedy, Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Adam Butcher, Campbell Scott

The story centers on Ralph Walker, a teenager attending a Catholic private school. His father was killed in World War II and his mother is hospitalized with an unidentified illness. Ralph is naturally prone to mischief and often finds himself an outcast among his classmates. He tries to emulate the conduct of grown ups, and is caught smoking cigarettes and masturbating by headmaster Father Fitzpatrick. Already labeled a troublemaker, Ralph is forced to join the school’s cross country team to relieve him of his excess energy.

When Ralph’s mother falls into a coma, he is told it will take a miracle for her to survive. When running coach Father Hibbert, a former world class marathoner who was forced to quit running when he injured his knee, claims it would be a miracle if a member of his team won the Boston Marathon, Ralph decides to train for it in the hope his victory would fulfill the miracle needed to save his mother’s life.

At first, Ralph cannot even keep up with his teammates in practice. He reads books to learn about running, uses the new techniques, and gradually improves. Father Hibbert decides to train him despite disapproval from Father Fitzpatrick. Ralph begins to win the respect of his classmates, and eventually wins the attention of the local media when he wins a prestigious regional race.

When Father Fitzpatrick learns Ralph intends to run the Boston Marathon, he threatens to expel him if he participates, as well as remove Father Hibbert from the priesthood should he try to interfere. Both Ralph and his mentor must then decide how deeply they believe in miracles, and what is possible when a person risks everything without promise of success.

Caddyshack

  • Directors: Harold Ramis
  • Producers: Douglas Kenney
  • Writers: Douglas Kenney, Harold Ramis, Brian Doyle Murray
  • Genres: Comedy, Sport
  • Actors: Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Michael O Keefe, Bill Murray, Dan Resin

Danny Noonan (Michael O’Keefe) works at the upscale Bushwood Country Club as he tries to raise enough money to go to college since his parents cannot afford it and his grades were unremarkable in high school. Danny caddies for Ty Webb (Chevy Chase), the free-spirited playboy son of one of Bushwood’s co-founders, as Ty teaches Danny about the finer points in life usually while showing off random trick shots. One day, Danny decides to caddy for Judge Smails (Ted Knight), the country club’s stodgy co-founder, in hopes of earning his favor when Smails awards the next scholarship. Smails’ golfing group includes includes Dr. Beeper, Bishop Pickering and Smails’ grandson, Spaulding. They are also joined by Smails’ sensuous niece, Lacey Underall (Cindy Morgan) , who is visiting for the summer. Meanwhile, Sandy McFiddish, Bushwood’s greenskeeper, entrusts his assistant Carl Spackler (Bill Murray) to remove a gopher digging tunnels underneith the fields.

During the game, Smails is mocked by Al Czervik (Rodney Dangerfield), a flamboyant nouveau riche real estate tycoon. Al loudly wagers $1,000 that Smails will miss his relatively short putt, which draws a crowd of onlookers. Smails misses the putt and, in anger, flings his putter in a blind rage, striking a woman. Danny takes responsibility for the incident, claiming the grips on the club were worn and Smails was not responsible, finally putting Danny in good standing with the judge. Smails mentions to Danny that the caddy scholarship has become available again, and encourages him to apply. At a Fourth of July banquet, Danny and girlfriend, Maggie O’Hooligan, work as servers as Danny becomes enamored of Lacey. Maggie informs Danny of Lacey’s sexually promiscuous reputation, but it only seems to encourage him further. However, when Ty arrives, he too catches the eye of Lacey.

The match is held the following day as Smails chooses Danny to be his caddy. Suddenly, word spreads of the stakes involved and a crowd builds. With Smails’ team is winning at the end of the 9th hole, Czervik decides to double the stakes to $40,000. Afterwards, Czervik is lightly hit by a ricocheting ball, but pretends to be hurt in hopes of having the contest declared a draw. The clubs’s manger, Lou, standing in as an umpire, tells Czervik would forfeit unless they were to use a substitute. Webb chooses Danny as Smails threatens to revoke Danny’s scholarship, but Czerik offers Danny a better offer as Danny turns down the judge’s scholarship. At the final hole, the score is tied. Judge Smails makes his putt, putting the Smails-Beeper team ahead by one shot. Danny must sink his very long putt to force a tie. Czervik raises the stakes to a double-or-nothing $80,000 on Danny making the putt, which Smails accepts. Danny’s putt reaches the edge of the cup stating that he lost the game. However, at that moment, Carl detonates the explosives in attempt to blast out the gopher. The force of the explosions rocks the course enough to cause Danny’s ball to drop, thereby winning the $80,000 bet for Webb and Czervik. The gopher emerges, unharmed by the explosives, and dances to Kenny Loggins’ “I’m All Right”.

Point Break

  • Directors: Kathryn Bigelow
  • Producers: James Cameron, Peter Abrams, Robert L Levy
  • Writers: W Peter Iliff, James Cameron
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Crime, Drama, Sport, Thriller
  • Actors: Patrick Swayze, Keanu Reeves, Gary Busey, Lori Petty, John C McGinley, James LeGros

Johnny Utah (Keanu Reeves), is a rookie FBI agent and former Ohio State quarterback who, with his partner Angelo Pappas (Gary Busey), is investigating a string of bank robberies by a gang of bank robbers known as the Ex-Presidents because they wear masks of former U.S. Presidents Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Pursuing a theory of Pappas’ that the criminals are surfers, Utah goes undercover to infiltrate the surfing community. Knowing little of the sport and lifestyle, Utah persuades orphan surfer girl Tyler Endicott (Lori Petty) to teach him to surf.

In the process, Utah develops a complex relationship with Bodhi (Patrick Swayze), the charismatic leader of a gang of surfers, Roach (James LeGros), Grommet (Bojesse Christopher), and Nathaniel (John Philbin), who accept Utah into their midst as they realize he is a great athlete. As he masters the art of surfing, Utah finds himself increasingly attracted to the surfers’ adrenaline-charged lifestyle, Bodhi’s philosophies, and to Tyler.

Following a clue gotten by analyzing toxins found in the hair of one of the bank robbers, Utah and Pappas lead an FBI raid on another gang of surfers. While criminals, these surfers are not the Ex-Presidents and the raid inadvertently ruins a DEA undercover operation.

Utah eventually catches up with Bodhi two years later at Bells Beach in Australia where a record storm is producing huge, but lethal waves, an event Bodhi had talked about experiencing. After a brutal physical altercation on the surf, Utah manages to handcuff Bodhi to his own wrist, but through Bodhi’s persuasion, releases him to go ride the once-in-a-lifetime wave which will kill him. Utah walks away, throwing his FBI badge into the ocean.

The Wrestler

  • Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  • Producers: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen
  • Writers: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  • Genres: Drama, Sport
  • Actors: John Turturro, John Goodman, Michael Lerner, Judy Davis, John Mahoney

At the start of the movie, Barton Fink is enjoying the success of his first play, Bare Ruined Choirs. His agent informs him that Capitol Pictures in Hollywood has offered a thousand dollars per week to write movie scripts. Barton hesitates, worried that moving to California would separate him from “the common man”, his focus as a writer. He accepts the offer, however, and checks into the Hotel Earle, a large and unusually deserted building. His room is sparse and draped in subdued colors; its only decoration is a small painting of a woman on the beach, arm raised to block the sun.

In his first meeting with Capitol Pictures boss Jack Lipnick (Michael Lerner), Barton explains that he chose the Earle because he wants lodging that is (as Lipnick says) “less Hollywood”.[2] Lipnick promises that his only concern is Barton’s writing ability, and assigns his new employee to a wrestling movie. Back in his room, however, Barton is unable to write. He is distracted by sounds coming from the room next door, and he phones the front desk to complain. His neighbor, Charlie Meadows (the source of the noise) visits Barton to apologize, and insists on sharing some alcohol from a hip flask to make amends. As they talk, Barton proclaims his affection for “the common man”, and Charlie describes his life as an insurance salesman.

Soon afterwards, Barton is visited by two police detectives, who inform him that Charlie’s real name is in fact Karl Mundt â€“ “Madman Mundt”.[4] He is a serial killer wanted for several murders; after shooting his victims, they explain, he decapitates them and keeps the heads. Stunned, Barton returns to his room and examines the box. Placing it on his desk without opening it, he begins writing and produces the entire script in one sitting. After a night of celebratory dancing, Barton returns to find the detectives in his room, who then reveal Mayhew’s murder. Charlie appears, and the hotel is engulfed in flames. Running through the hallway, screaming, Charlie shoots the policemen with a shotgun. As the hallway burns, Charlie speaks with Barton about their lives and the hotel, then retires to his own room. Barton leaves the hotel, carrying the box and his script. In a final meeting, a disappointed and betrayed Lipnick, who has been drafted into the Pacific Theatre of World War II with the rank of Colonel, angrily chastises Barton for writing “a fruity movie about suffering”,[5] then informs him that he is to remain in Los Angeles, and that â€“ although he will remain under contract â€“ Capitol Pictures will not produce anything he writes so he can be ridiculed as a loser around the studio while Lipnick is in the war. Dazed, Barton wanders onto a beach, still carrying the package. He meets a woman who looks just like the one in the picture on his wall at the Earle, and she asks about the box. He tells her that he knows neither what it contains nor to whom it belongs. She assumes the pose from the picture, and the film ends.

Ondskan

  • Directors:
  • Producers: Ingemar Leijonborg
  • Writers: Screenplay, Hans Gunnarsson, Novel, Jan Guillou
  • Genres: Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Andreas Wilson

Erik Ponti is a sixteen-year-old boy who faces a lot of violence in his life. At school, he and his gang lend money to other students at high interest, resulting in a beating if they don’t pay the money back in time; several teachers maltreat students that don’t behave (in the book; in the movie it is not explained so widely). At home he lives with his sadistic stepfather and his mother.

When Erik and his gang are caught stealing records from stores, Erik gets the entire blame because of the loose kind of loyalty in the gang, resulting in his expulsion from school (again, in the book; in the movie he’s just shown fighting with other students). But circumstances allow him to matriculate into a private boarding school, Stjärnsberg, where he gets a new chance to continue his studies. Erik decides to try and break away from his earlier violent lifestyle.

But Stjärnsberg isn’t as nice and friendly as it seems initially. Erik has to face new kinds of violence in this school; from upperclassmen and members of the school council instead of teachers. At the school, a system called “kamratuppfostran” (“schoolmate upbringing”) is in place; a codename for a violent kind of bullying directed especially at nonconforming students, ostensibly to keep discipline and order in school. Erik, being the kind of person who won’t accept injustices, quickly becomes the main target.