Bottle Rocket

  • Directors: Wes Anderson
  • Producers: Polly Platt, Cynthia Hargrave, Barbara Boyle, James L Brooks, Richard Sakai, Michael Taylor, David Jones, Andrew Wilson
  • Writers: Owen Wilson, Wes Anderson
  • Genres: Short, Comedy, Crime
  • Actors: Luke Wilson, Owen Wilson, James Caan, Robert Musgrave, Lumi Cavazos

The film centers on a group of aimless young men from a wealthy Texas community. As the movie opens, Dignan (Owen Wilson) “rescues” Anthony (Luke Wilson) from a voluntary mental hospital where he has been staying for self-described exhaustion. Dignan has an elaborate escape planned and has developed a 75-year plan, which he shows to Anthony on the escape bus. The plan is to pull off several heists and then meet Mr. Henry, a landscapist and part-time criminal known to Dignan.

The two friends waste no time in breaking into and robbing a house as a practice run, taking small, specific items from a list. During Dignan’s critique of the robbery, he mentions that he took diamond earrings, which were not on the list. Anthony becomes angered because the house was his family’s and he admonishes Dignan for stealing his mother’s earrings without permission.

Anthony visits his little sister at her school so she can return the earrings. Dignan recruits Bob Mapplethorpe as a getaway driver because he is the only person they know with his own car. The three make a road trip to buy guns and return to Bob’s house to plan their next heist, a local bookstore. The group bickers as Dignan struggles to describe his intricate plan to the others.

Anthony and Bob visit Dignan in prison. They catch up and tell him how Mr. Henry robbed Bob’s house. Dignan begins rattling off an escape plan and instructs his friends to get into position for a get-away. After a tense moment, the two realize that Dignan is joking. Before leaving, Dignan says to Anthony, “Isn’t it funny that you used to be in the nuthouse and now I’m in jail?” as he walks back into the prison. As in most Wes Anderson movies the ending is in slow motion.

Hostage

  • Directors: John Frankenheimer, Ang Lee, Wong Kar Wai, Guy Ritchie, John Woo, Joe Carnahan, Tony Scott
  • Producers: Robyn Boardman, Mary Ann Marino, Robert Van de Weteringe Buys, Jacky Pang Yee Wah, Tapas Blank, Arthur Anderson, Tony McGarry, Leon Corcos, David Mitchell, Angelica De Leon, Nicole Dionne, Aristides McGarry, David Fincher, Philip Steuer, Ridley Scott, Tony Scott, Jules Daly, Brian DiLorenzo
  • Writers: Andrew Kevin Walker, David Carter, Joe Sweet, Guy Ritchie, Guillermo Arriaga, Greg Hahn, Vincent Ngo, Joe Carnahan
  • Genres: Short, Action, Adventure, Crime, Thriller
  • Actors: Clive Owen, Tomas Milian, Mason Lee, Forest Whitaker, Mickey Rourke, Adriana Lima, Madonna, Lois Smith, Maury Chaykin, Kathryn Morris, Don Cheadle, F Murray Abraham, Clifton Powell, Gary Oldman, James Brown, Danny Trejo, Marilyn Manson

The plots of each of the films differ, but one constant remains: Clive Owen plays “The Driver”, a man who goes from place to place (in presumably rented BMW automobiles), getting hired by various people to be a sort of transport for their vital needs.

Star

  • Directors: John Frankenheimer, Ang Lee, Wong Kar Wai, Guy Ritchie, John Woo, Joe Carnahan, Tony Scott
  • Producers: Robyn Boardman, Mary Ann Marino, Robert Van de Weteringe Buys, Jacky Pang Yee Wah, Tapas Blank, Arthur Anderson, Tony McGarry, Leon Corcos, David Mitchell, Angelica De Leon, Nicole Dionne, Aristides McGarry, David Fincher, Philip Steuer, Ridley Scott, Tony Scott, Jules Daly, Brian DiLorenzo
  • Writers: Andrew Kevin Walker, David Carter, Joe Sweet, Guy Ritchie, Guillermo Arriaga, Greg Hahn, Vincent Ngo, Joe Carnahan
  • Genres: Action, Short, Comedy
  • Actors: Clive Owen, Tomas Milian, Mason Lee, Forest Whitaker, Mickey Rourke, Adriana Lima, Madonna, Lois Smith, Maury Chaykin, Kathryn Morris, Don Cheadle, F Murray Abraham, Clifton Powell, Gary Oldman, James Brown, Danny Trejo, Marilyn Manson

The plots of each of the films differ, but one constant remains: Clive Owen plays “The Driver”, a man who goes from place to place (in presumably rented BMW automobiles), getting hired by various people to be a sort of transport for their vital needs.

Wallace and Gromit in A Matter of Loaf and Death

  • Directors: Nick Park
  • Producers: Steve Pegram, Peter Lord, David Sproxton, Nick Park
  • Writers: Nick Park, Bob Baker
  • Genres: Animation, Short, Comedy, Family
  • Actors: Peter Sallis, Sally Lindsay

Bob the baker is murdered by an unseen assailant, the latest of twelve bakers to be killed. Meanwhile, Wallace and Gromit are running a “Dough to Door” delivery service from their bakery “Top Bun”. On one such delivery, the duo save Piella Bakewell[7], a former pin-up girl for the “Bake-O-Lite” bread company, and her dog Fluffles, when the brakes on her bike appear to fail. After narrowly avoiding being eaten by a crocodile after they careen into the local zoo, Gromit becomes suspicious on learning that the bike brakes were working fine, whereas Wallace becomes smitten with Piella. After a whirlwind romance, Piella gives Wallace’s house the “woman’s touch”. However, when she leaves her purse at the house, Wallace insists that Gromit return it. Thus, Gromit uncovers Piella’s identity as the “Cereal killer” and her plans to make Wallace her thirteenth victim, and completing a “baker’s dozen”.

Despite Wallace being oblivious, Gromit attempts to thwart Piella by installing an airport-style metal detector in their home. After tricking Wallace into thinking that Gromit bit her, Piella almost succeeds at pushing Wallace to his death whilst a chained up Gromit can only watch but Piella is hit by a bag of flour. After an angry outburst against bakers, she leaves but returns a short time later to apologise with a large cake. Wallace says that it will do nicely for four o’clock tea. When Piella is leaving to attend to the absent Fluffles (who is “not well”), she tells him he will be getting a surprise. A worried Gromit follows her home only to be caught and imprisoned with Fluffles in a storeroom. Escaping in Piella’s old Bake-O-Lite hot air balloon, they arrive at Wallace’s house as he is lighting the candle. After a struggle, the cake falls to the floor and the bomb inside is revealed. While attempting to dispose of the bomb, Gromit is attacked by Piella, who rails against bakers, and their baked products for ruining her figure and her career as the Bake-O-Lite girl. While attempting to finish off Wallace, a battle ensues between Piella and Fluffles in a yellow forklift truck covered by giant oven mitts, an homage to the classic final battle scene from the film Aliens. In the chaos, the bomb ends up in the back of Wallace’s trousers. Gromit and Fluffles neutralise the explosion using a large amount of dough while Piella uses the distraction to leap onto her balloon and escape. However, owing to her weight, the balloon crashes into the crocodile pit at the zoo where she is eaten. The balloon rises into the clouds alone as a devastated Wallace watches on.

In sorrow at the death of her owner, Fluffles leaves, with both Wallace and Gromit depressed over their losses. Deciding to take their minds off things, they head out to deliver bread and find Fluffles in the driveway. She joins them in the van and the three drive off into the sunset.

The Chronicles of Riddick Dark Fury

  • Directors: Peter Chung
  • Producers: John Kafka, Jae Y Moh
  • Writers: Characters, Jim Wheat, Ken Wheat, Story, David Twohy, Screenplay, Brett Matthews
  • Genres: Action, Animation, Sci-Fi, Short
  • Actors: Vin Diesel, Rhiana Griffith, Keith David, Nick Chinlund, Tress MacNeille, Roger L Jackson

Shortly after escaping the planet from Pitch Black, Riddick, Jack and Abu (the Imam) are picked up by a ship. They quickly discover that it’s a mercenary ship. Although Riddick attempts to conceal his identity from the mercenaries by impersonating William J. Johns (in Pitch Black) over the intercom, they quickly voice-print and identify him.

Captured by the mercenaries, the trio of survivors rapidly discover that their captors have unusual plans for them. The ship’s owner, Antonia Chillingsworth (Tress MacNeille) is a collector of criminals, whom she freezes and keeps as statues that are, in her view, art. Although the criminals are frozen, they are still alive and conscious. To her Riddick is the ultimate “masterpiece” for her collection. Riddick, Jack, and Imam must face down and fight their way through the enormous army of human and nonhuman creatures at her disposal, or they will meet a fate far more cruel than death.

This film carries important character development elements for Jack (who becomes Kyra in The Chronicles of Riddick), as at the end she discovers her violent side by shooting the ship’s owner just before she can kill Riddick. This discovery is clearly a source of worry for Riddick and Imam as the three escape from the mercenary ship. This manifests itself in Riddick’s decision to deliver both Jack and Imam at New Mecca at the conclusion of the animation.

The Snowman

  • Directors: Dianne Jackson
  • Producers: John Coates
  • Writers: Raymond Briggs
  • Genres: Animation, Short, Adventure, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors:

The Snowman is the tale of a boy who builds a snowman one winter’s day. That night, at the stroke of twelve, the snowman comes to life. The first part of the story deals with the snowman’s attempts to understand the appliances, toys and other bric-a-brac in the boy’s house, all while keeping quiet enough not to wake the boy’s parents. The two then venture back outside and go for a ride on a motorcycle, disturbing many animals: pheasants, rabbits, a barn owl, a fox and a brown horse.

In the second part of the story, the boy and the snowman take flight — the song “Walking in the Air” appears at this point. They fly over the boy’s town, over houses and large public buildings before flying past a pier and out into the ocean. They continue north past many sights and animals. Flying into the aurora borealis they reach their destination.

The two wander hand-in-hand into a snow-covered forest and attend a snowmen’s party, at which the boy is the only human. They meet Father Christmas and his reindeer, and the boy is given a scarf with a snowman pattern.

The story ends after the return journey. However, the sun has come out the next morning and the boy wakes up to find the snowman has melted. The viewer begins to wonder if the night’s events were all a dream, but the boy discovers that he still has the scarf given to him by Father Christmas.

The Music Box

  • Directors: James Parrott
  • Producers: Hal Roach
  • Writers: H M Walker
  • Genres: Comedy, Short
  • Actors: Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy

Mrs. von Schwarzenhoffen has bought a player piano as a surprise birthday present for her husband Professor Theodore von Schwarzenhoffen. Stan and Ollie have started a “transfer co.” and must deliver it. As they near the address in their horse and cart they ask a postman for directions. He tells them that it is at the top of the ‘stoop’, up a preposterously tall flight of stairs.

Stan and Ollie unload the piano from their cart, but their horse (“Susie”) takes a malicious step, dumping the piano right onto Ollie’s back. Carrying it across the street, they start to carry the piano up the stairs. A quarter of the way up a nursemaid with a baby carriage asks to pass by. They let go of the piano and it careens to the bottom of the stairs. At the bottom of the stairs the nursemaid begins to laugh at the duo and says “of all the dumb things.” Stan kicks her backside, so she punches him. Ollie laughs, and she breaks a bottle on his head. The woman goes off to complain to a police officer telling him that Stan kicked her “right in the middle of my daily duties.” The police officer arrives as they are halfway up the stairs with the piano. Ollie sends Stan to the bottom of the stairs to talk to the officer, but he wants to speak to Ollie (“I don’t want you – I want that other monkey!”). Stan calls him down (“He wants the other monkey!”), and the piano chases Ollie back to the bottom of the stairs once again. The police officer kicks Ollie in the backside and hits Stan on the head with his truncheon to teach the boys a lesson.

Ollie realizes he’s about to be crushed by the piano as they take it off the cart, so he unhooks Susie. They wheel it to the front door and ring the doorbell but nobody is home. They decide to lift the piano into the house through an open upstairs window. The pair create a colossal mess and destroy most of the fabric of the house’s interior getting the piano down the stairs and into the living room; they then unpack the piano (flooding the room in the process, since the box had filled up with water after accidentally being dropped in the ornamental pool Ollie had earlier stepped in), and set it playing a medley of “Patriotic Songs” (which inexplicably includes the “The Arkansas Traveler”), to which the boys perform an impromptu dance while they begin to tidy up, whereupon the professor arrives home. Furious at seeing the deliverymen again, and in his house without permission, he flies into a rage, proclaims his hatred for pianos, and takes an axe to it. The piano starts to play the Star Spangled Banner and they all stand to attention. The professor turns the piano off and takes the axe to it once more. The professor’s wife arrives home and he tells her that “these idiots delivered this piano by mistake”. She tells him it’s his birthday present, so he decides he likes pianos and in fact he’s “nuts” about them. He asks Stan and Ollie what he can do for them. They ask him to sign the delivery note and hand him the note and a fountain pen. The pen squirts ink into his face, and he then chases Stan and Ollie out of the house.

Rabbit Fire

  • Directors: Charles M Jones
  • Producers: Eddie Selzer
  • Writers:
  • Genres: Animation, Family, Short, Comedy
  • Actors:

The short starts out like many Bugs Bunny cartoons do: Elmer Fudd follows a trail of “wabbit twacks” left by a rabbit he presumes to be Bugs Bunny. It turns out, however, that the tracks are being left by Daffy Duck, who, using the feet from a rabbit costume, makes the prints lead right up to Bugs’ rabbit hole. “Survival of the fittest,” Daffy tells the audience as he runs to hide, “…and besides, it’s fun!”

When Elmer appears, Bugs informs him that the hunter cannot legally shoot the rabbit, since it is Duck Season. Daffy emerges from his hiding place, screaming that Bugs’ claim is “an inmitigated feraberication. It’s Wabbit Season.” The argument then continues:

Elmer then obliges and shoots the duck’s bill causing it to spin and then resting back where it was again. Uninjured, yet embarrassed, Daffy starts the argument back up again.

Once again, Elmer obliges and shoots Daffy’s bill 180 degrees out of position to the back of his head. And once again uninjured, Daffy suggests Bugs start the argument again.

This time, the shot causes Daffy’s entire head to flip upside-down. Daffy walks away, disoriented.

Elmer yells at Daffy to come back, and tries to shoot him with his rifle, only to hear it click.

A visibly irate Elmer starts the hunt again for both “that scwewy wabbit and that scwewball duck”. They appear with Bugs dressed as a pretty female hunter with Daffy as her dog, but are exposed after Daffy bites Elmer’s leg (“Gypsy, you naughty bow-wow! Stop that!”) and Bugs’ ear pokes out of the blonde wig he is wearing. The argument continues near a tree with signs. Bugs and Daffy keep pulling sign after sign (with “RABBIT SEASON” in orange and “DUCK SEASON” in lighter yellow) until, in a notable and comical twist, it turns out to be “ELMER SEASON” (the sign featuring Elmer’s face above said text, also resembling a Wanted poster), prompting the hunter to run and Bugs and Daffy to don hunting gear and inform the audiences to be “vewwy, vewwy quiet…we’re hunting Elmers!” Then Daffy laughs like Elmer, which ends the short.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas

  • Directors:
  • Producers:
  • Writers:
  • Genres: Animation, Short, Comedy, Family, Fantasy, Musical
  • Actors:

The Grinch, a bitter, cave-dwelling creature with a heart “two sizes too small,” lives on snowy Mount Crumpit, a steep, 3,000-foot (910 m) high mountain just north of Whoville, home of the merry and warm-hearted Whos. His only companion is Max, his faithful dog. From his perch high atop Mount Crumpit, the Grinch can hear the noisy Christmas festivities that take place in Whoville. Envious of the Whos’ happiness, he makes plans to descend on the town and, by means of burglary, deprive them of their Christmas presents and decorations and thus “prevent Christmas from coming”. However, he learns in the end that despite his success in stealing all the Christmas presents and decorations from the Whos, Christmas comes just the same. He then realizes that Christmas is more than just gifts and presents. His heart grows three sizes larger, he returns all the presents and trimmings, and is warmly welcomed into the community of the Whos.

Sherlock Jr

  • Directors: Buster Keaton
  • Producers: Joseph M Schenck, Buster Keaton
  • Writers: Clyde Bruckman, Jean Havez, Joseph A Mitchell
  • Genres: Short, Action, Comedy, Crime, Fantasy, Mystery
  • Actors: Buster Keaton

A movie projectionist and janitor (Buster Keaton) who is studying to become a detective is in love with a beautiful girl (Kathryn McGuire). On a date he presents her with chocolates and an engagement ring. However, there is another man who’s also interested in his girl (Ward Crane).

One day he is accused of stealing his girlfriend’s father’s watch. He falls asleep on the job and dreams that he is a Sherlock Holmes-type detective, solving the case of who stole a valuable pearl necklace.