The Maiden Heist

  • Directors: Peter Hewitt
  • Producers: Bob Yari, Lori McCreary, Rob Paris, Morgan Freeman, Michael LeSieur, Peter Hewitt, Brad Jenkel, Dennis Brown, David C Glasser, William J Immerman
  • Writers: Michael LeSieur
  • Genres: Comedy, Crime
  • Actors: Christopher Walken, Morgan Freeman, William H Macy, Marcia Gay Harden

A comedy centered on three museum security guards (Morgan Freeman, Christopher Walken and William H. Macy) who devise a plan to steal back the artworks to which they have become attached after the new curator has planned to have the artworks transferred to another museum.[2]

The Blind Side

  • Directors: John Lee Hancock
  • Producers: Broderick Johnson, Andrew Kosove, Gil Netter
  • Writers: Screenplay, John Lee Hancock, Book, Michael Lewis
  • Genres: Drama, Sport
  • Actors: Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw, Quinton Aaron, and Kathy Bates

The Blind Side depicts the true story of Michael Oher, a homeless 18 year old from a broken home. He enrolls in a private Christian School and struggles to fit in because he is woefully underprepared. Eventually, he is taken in by the Tuohys, a well-to-do family who helps him fulfill his potential. At the same time, Oher’s presence in the Tuohys’ lives leads them to some self-discoveries of their own. Recognizing his potential talent as a football player, they encourage him. Living in his new environment, the 18-year-old faces a completely different set of challenges. As a football player and student, Oher works hard and, with the help of his coaches and adopted family, becomes an All-American offensive left tackle.

An Inconvenient Truth

  • Directors: Davis Guggenheim
  • Producers: Lawrence Bender, Scott Z Burns, Laurie David, Co Producer Line Producer, Lesley Chilcott, Executive Producer, Jeffrey D Ivers, Jeff Skoll, Ricky Strauss, Diane Weyermann
  • Writers: Al Gore
  • Genres: Documentary
  • Actors: Al Gore

An Inconvenient Truth focuses on Al Gore and his travels in support of his efforts to educate the public about the severity of the climate crisis. Gore says, “I’ve been trying to tell this story for a long time and I feel as if I’ve failed to get the message across.”[4] The film documents a Keynote presentation (dubbed “the slide show”) that Gore has presented throughout the world. It intersperses Gore’s exploration of data and predictions regarding climate change and its potential for disaster with his own life story.

The former vice president opens the film by greeting an audience with a joke: “I am Al Gore; I used to be the next President of the United States.”[5] After laughter from the crowd, Gore begins his slide show on climate change; a comprehensive presentation replete with detailed graphs, flow charts and stark visuals. Gore shows off several majestic photographs of the Earth taken from multiple space missions, Earthrise and The Blue Marble.[6] Gore notes that these photos dramatically transformed the way we see the Earth; helping spark modern environmentalism.

Following this, Gore shares vivid anecdotes that inspired his passion for the issue, including his college education with early climate expert Roger Revelle at Harvard University, his sister’s death from lung cancer and his young son’s near-fatal car accident. Gore recalls a story from his grade school years, where a fellow student asked his geography teacher about continental drift; in response, the teacher called the concept the “most ridiculous thing [he’d] ever heard.” Gore ties this conclusion to the assumption that “the Earth is so big, we can’t possibly have any lasting, harmful impact on the Earth’s environment.” For comic effect, Gore uses a clip from the Futurama episode “Crimes of the Hot” to describe the greenhouse effect. Gore refers to his loss to George W. Bush in the 2000 United States presidential election as a “hard blow” yet subsequently “brought into clear focus, the mission [he] had been pursuing for all these years.”

Gore’s book of the same title was published concurrently with the theatrical release of the documentary. The book contains additional information, scientific analysis, and Gore’s commentary on the issues presented in the documentary. A 2007 documentary entitled An Update with Former Vice President Al Gore features Gore discussing additional information that came to light after the film was completed, such as Hurricane Katrina, coral reef depletion, glacial earthquake activity on the Greenland ice sheet, wildfires, and trapped methane gas release associated with permafrost melting.[10]

A Serious Man

  • Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  • Producers: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen
  • Writers: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen
  • Genres: Comedy
  • Actors: Michael Stuhlbarg, Richard Kind, Sari Wagner Lennick, Fred Melamed, Aaron Wolff

Minnesota, 1967. Larry Gopnik (Michael Stuhlbarg) is a Jewish physics professor who is being considered for tenure at the university. His son Danny (Aaron Wolff) lives in constant fear of a physically intimidating Hebrew school classmate named Mike Fagle (Jon Kaminski Jr.), to whom Danny owes twenty dollars for marijuana. His teacher catches him listening to a portable radio in class and confiscates it.

Larry’s brother Arthur (Richard Kind) is sleeping on the couch and obsessively writing in a notebook. He purports it to be a scientific research work called The Mentaculus determining the fundamental mathematical relationships that tie all natural laws together.

A Korean-born student, Clive (David Kang), is about to flunk Larry’s class and lose his scholarship. He protests that Larry’s exams are unfair; that he understands the illustrative stories about Schrödinger’s Cat but does not understand the math. After the student leaves the office, Larry spots a thick envelope left by Clive and containing a great sum of money.

Larry’s wife Judith (Sari Lennick) is seeking a divorce and needs a get (a Jewish divorce), so she can marry widower Sy Ableman (Fred Melamed). At the insistence of Judith and Sy, Larry and Arthur eventually move into a nearby motel, the “Jolly Roger”. Judith has withdrawn all of the couple’s money from their joint accounts, leaving Larry penniless.

Larry’s department head compliments Larry on Danny’s bar mitzvah and hints that he will earn tenure. Upon receiving the bill for Arthur’s criminal lawyer he decides to pass Clive after all, and take the bribe left in his desk. His doctor calls him and asks to see him to talk about the results of a chest X-ray. At the same time a massive tornado is approaching Danny’s school.

Flags of Our Fathers

  • Directors: Clint Eastwood
  • Producers: Clint Eastwood, Robert Lorenz, Steven Spielberg
  • Writers: James Bradley, Ron Powers, William Broyles Jr, Paul Haggis
  • Genres: Action, Drama, History, War
  • Actors: Ryan Phillippe, Adam Beach, Jesse Bradford, Neal McDonough, Barry Pepper, Robert Patrick, Paul Walker, Jamie Bell, John Benjamin Hickey, John Slattery

The story focuses on seven US Marines of the 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division, Sgt. Mike Strank, Pfc. Rene Gagnon, Pfc. Ira Hayes, Cpl. Harlon Block, Pfc. Franklin Sousley, Sgt. Hank Hansen, and Pfc. Ralph Ignatowski, as well as their Navy Corpsman, PhM2. John “Doc” Bradley.

In December 1944, U.S. Marines train at Camp Tarawa, Hawaii. They train by climbing a large mountain and getting in Higgins boats. The Marines then set sail across the Pacific, and it is revealed that they are headed to the small island of Iwo Jima, located less than 700 miles from the Japanese mainland. As Captain Severance puts it, they will be fighting on Japanese soil, and will expect tough resistance. A few days later, the armada arrives off the coast of Iwo Jima and the ships of the US Navy open fire on suspected Japanese positions. On the night before the landings, Mike is put in charge of second platoon.

The next day, February 19, 1945, the Marines hit the beach in landing craft and meet no resistance. Ralph, aka “Iggy”, suspects that the Navy killed all the Japanese defenders, as do most of the Marines. After several tense minutes the Marines advance forward and the Japanese open fire. The battle is extremely intense, and the Marines take heavy casualties. Japanese heavy artillery opens fire upon the Marines on shore, as well as the Navy ships. After several attempts, Second Platoon takes out a Japanese pillbox which was pinning them down. They advance forward, as do many other Marines. The battle begins to calm down and the beachheads are secure. Two days later the Marines attack Mount Suribachi under a rain of Japanese artillery and machine gun fire, as the Navy bombards the mountain. It is here that Doc saves the lives of several Marines under fire which later earns him the Navy Cross. Finally, the mountain is secure. For the next four nights, the Marines take cover in foxholes as Japanese soldiers charge through the mist.

In September the war ends and Doc, Rene and Ira go home. Ira tries to move on but is never able to escape his unwanted fame. One day in 1952 after being released from jail, he hitchhikes over 1,300 miles to Texas to see Harlon Block’s family. He tells Ed Block, Harlon’s father that Harlon was indeed at the base of the flag in the famous photograph. In 1954, the USMC War Memorial is dedicated and the three flag raisers see each one last time. In 1955 Ira dies of exposure after a night of drinking. That same year Doc drove to a town where Iggy’s mom lived and told her how Iggy died, though it is implied that he lied. Rene has little success as the business offers he received on the bond drive are no longer offered to him. He spends the rest of his life as a high school janitor, dying in 1979. Doc is the only successful one. He buys the funeral home he worked at before the war and runs it for the rest of his life. In 1995, as he is on his death bed, he tells his son James how after the flag raising Captain Severance took the men swimming. He then dies peacefully. In a final flashback to 1945, the men swim in the ocean after raising the flags.

Meet the Robinsons

  • Directors: Steve Anderson
  • Producers: Dorothy McKim, John Lasseter
  • Writers: William Joyce, Screenplay, Jon A Bernstein, Michelle Spritz, Nathan Greno
  • Genres: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Jordan Fry, Harland Williams, Tom Kenny, Steve Anderson, Angela Bassett, Laurie Metcalf, Adam West, Tom Selleck, Nicole Sullivan

The film begins showing a young woman leaving her baby boy on the steps of an orphanage. Twelve years later, this boy, called Lewis (Daniel Hansen and Jordan Fry), is an aspiring inventor. He has yet to be adopted and fears that he never will be. Convinced that his birth mother will want him, he attempts to invent a memory-scanning machine that will allow him to remember his mother in the hopes that he can find her. His roommate, Mike ” Goob” Yagoobian (Matthew Josten), becomes his assistant during long hours of building, which causes Goob’s Little League baseball team’s performance to suffer.

At Lewis’ school science fair, Lewis is approached by a thirteen-year-old boy named Wilbur Robinson (Wesley Singerman), who claims to be a “time cop” from the future and that a man wearing a bowler hat has stolen a time machine that Wilbur wishes to recapture. The sinister ‘Bowler Hat Guy’ (Stephen Anderson), sends Doris (Ethan Sandler), his robotic bowler hat with mechanical arms, to sabotage Lewis’ memory-scanner. As Lewis begins demonstrating the use of his machine, it explodes, throwing the science fair into chaos. Lewis runs out, and the Bowler Hat Guy steals his unattended memory scanner.

Cornelius (Tom Selleck) appears back from his business trip and meets his younger self. Wilbur fulfills his promise to Lewis by visiting the moment at which his mother abandoned him. Lewis nearly interrupts her from leaving the infant “him”, but stops, choosing his Robinson future over a childhood with his mother. Finally, Lewis returns to his own time and prevents Goob from becoming the Bowler Hat Guy by waking him up in time to catch the ball that wins him the game. Lewis then returns to the science fair and demonstrates his memory scanner on the science fair judge, Dr. Krunkelhorn (Laurie Metcalf), revealing that she is Wilbur’s grandmother, Lucille. Lewis also meets a young Franny, and flirts with her briefly. Bud and Lucille adopt Lewis, who adopts the name Cornelius and sets to work building Carl in an observatory bought by Bud and Lucile which one day becomes the Robinson house. Just before Lewis/Cornelius drives off with Bud and Lucille, he turns around and waves at Goob, who is also leaving the orphanage with his own new family.

Far Cry

  • Directors: Uwe Boll
  • Producers: Uwe Boll, Shawn Williamson, Dan Clarke, Wolfgang Herold
  • Writers: Michael Roesch, Peter Scheerer
  • Genres: Action, Adventure, Drama
  • Actors: Til Schweiger, Emmanuelle Vaugier, Clint Howard, Will Sanderson, Michael Eklund, Chris Spencer, Udo Kier, Tyron Lietso, Patrick Muldoon, Craig Skistimas, Thomas Hanley, Mike Dopud, Anthony Bourdain

Jack Carver, a former member of the German Special Forces, takes the journalist Valerie Cardinal to an island to visit her uncle Max, who is working in a military complex on the island. As they arrive, Valerie gets captured by the minions of Doctor Krieger. Jack does not care about her until his boat explodes. After the destruction of his boat Jack finds out about the true purpose of the facilities on the island, which is the creation of genetically modified soldiers.

Shooter

  • Directors: Antoine Fuqua
  • Producers: Lorenzo di Bonaventura
  • Writers: Stephen Hunter, Jonathan Lemkin
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Mystery, Thriller
  • Actors: Mark Wahlberg, Danny Glover, Ned Beatty, Tate Donovan, Kate Mara, Mike Dopud

Bob Lee Swagger (Mark Wahlberg), a retired Gunnery Sergeant Marine Scout Sniper, is one of the few snipers in the world whose sharpshooting abilities allow him to “take out a target from a mile away.” He reluctantly leaves a self-imposed exile from his isolated mountain home at the request of Colonel Isaac Johnson (Danny Glover). Johnson appeals to his expertise and patriotism to help track down an assassin who plans on shooting the president from a great distance with a high powered rifle. Johnson gives him a list of three cities where the President is scheduled to visit so Swagger could determine if an attempt could be made at any of them.

Swagger assesses each of the locations and determines that a site in Philadelphia would be most conducive to a long range assassination attempt. He passes this information to Johnson, who purportedly arranges for a response. This turns out to be a set-up: while Swagger is working with Johnson’s agents — including a local police officer — to find the rumored assassin, the Ethiopian archbishop is instead assassinated while standing next to the president. Swagger is shot by the officer, but manages to escape. The agents tell the police and public that Swagger is the shooter, and stage a massive manhunt for the injured sniper. However, Swagger has a stroke of luck — he meets a rookie FBI special agent, Nick Memphis (Michael Peña), disarms him and steals his car.

Later appearing in a closed meeting with the Director of the FBI and the United States Attorney General present, Swagger clears his name by loading a rifle round (supplied by Memphis) into his rifle (which is there as evidence since it was supposedly used in the killing), aiming it at the Colonel and pulling the trigger — which fails to fire the round. Swagger explains that every time he leaves his house, he takes out all the firing pins replacing them with slightly shorter ones, thus rendering them unable to fire until he returns. Although Swagger is exonerated, Colonel Johnson takes advantage of a legal loophole — the Ethiopian genocide is outside American legal jurisdiction — and walks free. The attorney general approaches Swagger and states that as a law enforcement official, he must abide by the law (he insinuates that if it was the “wild west” it would be appropriate to clean the system with a gun). Afterwards, the Colonel and the Senator plan their next move while at the Senator’s vacation house — only to be interrupted by an attack by Swagger. He kills both conspirators, one of the Colonel’s aides and two bodyguards, then breaks open a gas valve before leaving. The fire in the fireplace ignites the gas, blowing up the house. The final scene shows Swagger getting into a car with Fenn and driving away.

White Christmas

  • Directors: Michael Curtiz
  • Producers: Robert Emmett Dolan
  • Writers: Norman Krasna, Norman Panama, Melvin Frank
  • Genres: Comedy, Musical, Romance
  • Actors: Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, Vera Ellen, Dean Jagger, Mary Wickes

The story is about two World War II U.S. Army buddies, one a former Broadway entertainer, Bob Wallace (Crosby), and a would-be entertainer, Phil Davis (Kaye). It begins on Christmas Eve, 1944, somewhere in Europe. In a forward area, Captain Wallace is giving a show to the men with the help of Private Davis, (“White Christmas”). Major General Thomas F. Waverly (Dean Jagger) arrives for the end of the show and has a field inspection prior to being relieved of command by General Harold G. Coughlan (Gavin Gordon) The men give him a rousing send-off, (“The Old Man”). During an enemy artillery barrage, Davis saves Wallace’s life from a toppling wall, wounding his arm slightly in the process. Using his “wounded” arm and telling Bob he doesn’t expect any “special obligation,” Phil convinces Bob to join forces when the war is over. Phil using his arm wound as a way to get Bob to do what he wants becomes a running gag throughout the movie.

After the war, they make it big in nightclubs, radio, and then on Broadway. They become the hottest act around and eventually become producers. They subsequently have a big hit with their New York musical, Playing Around. In mid-December, after 2 years on Broadway, the show is in Florida. While at the Florida Theatre, they receive a letter from “Freckle-Faced Haynes, the dog-faced boy”, a mess sergeant they knew in the war, asking them to audition his two sisters. When they go to the club to audition the act (“Sisters”), Betty (Rosemary Clooney) reveals that her sister, Judy (Vera-Ellen), sent the letter. Bob and Phil help Betty and Judy escape their landlord and the local sheriff (the landlord claimed that the sisters had burned a $200 rug). The boys do the song “Sisters” to a record as the girls escape to the train. Phil gives Betty and Judy the train tickets that he and Bob were intending to use. When Bob and Phil arrive on the train, they have no tickets. Using “his arm” again, Phil gets Bob to agree to travel with the girls to Vermont for the holidays (“Snow”). They discover that the Columbia Inn in Pine Tree, Vermont, is run by their former commanding officer, Major General Tom Waverly, and it’s about to go bankrupt because of the lack of snow and consequent lack of patrons. The general has invested all his savings and pension into the lodge.

In a memorable finale, Bob and Betty declare their love, as do Phil and Judy. The background of the set is removed to show the snow falling in Pine Tree. Everyone raises a glass, toasting, “May your days be merry and bright; and may all your Christmases be white.”

Kick Ass

  • Directors: Matthew Vaughn
  • Producers: Matthew Vaughn, Kris Thykier, Tarquin Pack, Brad Pitt, Executive producers, Mark Millar, John Romita Jr
  • Writers: Screenplay, Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn, Comic Book, Mark Millar
  • Genres: Action, Comedy, Drama
  • Actors: Aaron Johnson, Nicolas Cage, Chloe Moretz, Mark Strong, Christopher Mintz Plasse, Lyndsy Fonseca

The plot of Kick-Ass concerns a lonely teenage boy, Dave Lizewski (Aaron Johnson), who decides to become a real-life superhero after being inspired by the heroes of comic-books. He soon encounters a mysterious vigilante called Big-Daddy (Nicolas Cage), and his daughter Hit Girl (Chloë Moretz), who are working to bring down the drug baron, Frank D’Amico.