Merlin

  • Directors:
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  • Writers:
  • Genres: Drama, Family, Fantasy
  • Actors: Colin Morgan, Angel Coulby, Bradley James, Katie McGrath, John Hurt, with Anthony Head, and Richard Wilson

Merlin arrives at the city of Camelot, where the king, Uther Pendragon, has outlawed magic and imprisoned the last dragon. Merlin, who was born with extraordinary magical powers, is taken as the apprentice of Gaius. Merlin later discovers, after being informed by the last dragon, who is held as a prisoner deep under the city, that he has an important destiny in protecting Uther’s arrogant son, Arthur, so that he may grow up to find a great kingdom.

The era in which the series is set is ambiguous; traditionally the Arthurian legends are set in the dark ages, and the idea of King Uther reigning over a small kingdom (which is present in both traditional legend and the television series) sets it before the union of England in 927. Despite this, the castle interiors are 15th century, making the series’ setting inconsistent with English history. Britain is never mentioned, although the dragon has used the name Albion, which is the oldest known name for Great Britain.

The television series deviates significantly from more traditional versions of the legend (i.e., canon), such as those written by Geoffrey of Monmouth and Thomas Malory. For instance, in the original myth, it is Arthur who builds Camelot, whereas in this series it pre-dates Arthur’s father Uther. Another key difference is that in the television series, Arthur and Merlin are of approximately the same age, whereas in traditional myth, Merlin is much older, and acts as Arthur’s tutor. This kind of relationship is played out between Gaius and Merlin. Morgana, normally shown as an evil sorceress, is here a kind and caring woman.

Other characters from Arthurian legend have appeared. Lancelot was portrayed as a commoner who longed to become a knight. Mordred has been shown as a young Druid boy who formed a bond with Morgana (in some legends Mordred’s mother) and who was prophesied by the Great Dragon to be the cause of death of Arthur (in the legend this occurred at the Battle of Camlann). Mordred and the Great Dragon referred to Merlin by his Druidic name, Emrys (the Welsh form of Ambrosius; Ambrosius Aurelianus was a historical figure whom Geoffrey of Monmouth partially merged with Merlin[citation needed]). Geoffrey of Monmouth himself has appeared as the court genealogist.

Thick as Thieves

  • Directors: Mimi Leder
  • Producers: Boaz Davidson, Lori McCreary, Danny Lerner, Les Weldon, Randall Emmett
  • Writers: Ted Humphrey
  • Genres: Crime
  • Actors: Morgan Freeman, Antonio Banderas, Radha Mitchell

Set in New York City, a veteran thief recruits a younger crook to help him pull off one final job in order to repay his debt to the Russian mob. It turns out that the younger crook was actually a Miami cop on loan to the NYPD, and was looking to bring the veteran thief to justice by being an undercover thief. The cop gets involved in a relationship with the veteran thief’s goddaughter when he starts to work with him. When they get around to pulling the final job, a Russian mobster kidnaps the goddaughter and demands two Fabergé eggs to be stolen in return. When the duo get into the vaults of the museum with the eggs, the cop takes the eggs and runs to the Russian mobster to get his lover back. In the end though, the mobster was a good friend of the veteran thief and they set up the cop (it turned out they knew he was a cop) to take the eggs from one and give it to the other. The movie ends when the mobster and veteran thief look for a buyer and the cop decides to move to the thief life as his police career is over. The cop also gets back together with his lover, who turns out to be the Russian mobster’s daughter.[3]

The Transformers The Movie

  • Directors: Nelson Shin
  • Producers: Joe Bacal, Tom Griffith, Nelson Shin, Margaret Loesch, Lee Gunther
  • Writers: Ron Friedman
  • Genres: Animation, Action, Adventure, Family, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Peter Cullen, Judd Nelson, Leonard Nimoy, Orson Welles, Robert Stack, Frank Welker

Unicron, a space-roaming artificial planet, destroys and eats robot planet Lithone, along with its population. A few of the inhabitants attempt to flee the planet in spaceships but only one gets away.

It is revealed that the evil Decepticons have gained control of the Transformers’ homeworld, Cybertron at some point in the intervening twenty years since the beginning of the struggle between the robotic warriors on Earth (The exact means by which this victory was attained was never revealed). The heroic Autobots are readying themselves on two of Cybertron’s moons for a strike against the Decepticons, preparing a supply shuttle for launch to Autobot City on Earth. Their transmission is intercepted by the Decepticons, who ambush the shuttle and kill its crew, consisting of Ironhide, Ratchet, Prowl, and Brawn. The Decepticons then attempt to use the ship to infiltrate Autobot City on Earth without being detected.

Meanwhile, on Earth, Daniel Witwicky and Hot Rod fish in a lake nearby Autobot City, discussing Daniel’s loneliness, as his father Spike is on one of the Autobot moon bases. They pick up the shuttle’s signature, and race up to Lookout Mountain to see it land, irritating the old Autobot Kup in the process. They notice its damaged exterior and spot Decepticons, upon which Hot Rod fires at the stowaways. After a brief battle pitting Hot Rod and Kup against the Decepticons Blitzwing and Shrapnel, the Decepticons begin their attack on Autobot City. The outnumbered Autobots, including Autobot City Commander Ultra Magnus, Blurr, Springer, Perceptor, and female Autobot Arcee, transform Autobot City into a battle fortress and both sides settle down for a long siege that lasts the rest of the day and all of the following night. Early in the battle, Ultra Magnus sends orders to alert Blaster to radio for assistance from their commander Optimus Prime. An attempt to thwart the transmission by Soundwave and his cassette Decepticons fails, and the next morning Optimus and the Dinobots arrive to successfully repel the Decepticon invaders, including the here far more competent Devastator, who is displayed as being far more effective and brutal when compared to his depictions in the Television series prior to the release of the film.

The movie was produced by Sunbow/Marvel simultaneous to G.I. Joe: The Movie. The writers of the G.I. Joe film asked for permission from Hasbro to kill a character, Duke. Hasbro not only approved the request but “insisted” that the writers of Transformers: The Movie adopt the same fate for Optimus Prime.[3] However, Optimus Prime’s death sparked much controversy and incurred so much backlash that it caused the writers to make changes so that Duke simply ended up in a coma (and eventually woke up from the coma).[4]

Moonwalker

  • Directors:
  • Producers:
  • Writers:
  • Genres: Action, Crime, Fantasy, Music, Sci-Fi, Thriller
  • Actors:

The music video to Jackson’s song “Man in the Mirror” acts as the opening segment to the film. This short film features a montage of clips of children from Africa, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other historical figures.

A short biographical film about Jackson, covering the years from his birth until the Bad tour. Excerpts of the following songs are played:

A parody of the music video for Bad’s title song, featuring children filling the roles of various people from the original clip.

Of note, this video features a young Nikki Cox, who would eventually star on Unhappily Ever After and Las Vegas. The singing group The Boys appear as background dancers. The video also features Jermaine Jackson, Jr., and Brandon Quintin Adams of Mighty Ducks fame.

The “Badder” clip transitions into a second short film, referred to as Speed Demon, directed by Claymation innovator Will Vinton. This acts as the music video to the song Speed Demon. In the film, Michael, in an attempt to avoid overzealous fans (even The Noid), disguises himself as a rabbit (named Spike), but ends up taunting the fans into chasing him. During the chase, he morphs into other celebrities, including Sylvester Stallone, Tina Turner, and Pee-Wee Herman. After finally losing the fans, he removes the costume, which comes to life and challenges him to a dance-off. In the end, a policeman tells him he is in a “No Moonwalking Zone”, and when Michael turns to point Spike, the rabbit has already left. The policeman then sarcastically asks for his autograph (as opposed to “signature”) on the ticket. Just as Michael is preparing to leave, the rocky crag in front of him morphs into Spike’s head, who then nods to him, leaving Michael one-upped by his own alter-ego. Nonetheless, he seems happy enough as he leaves.

During the closing credits, two more segments are shown. The first has Ladysmith Black Mambazo performing “The Moon is Walking” in Club 30’s amidst behind-the-scenes clips. The second is the four-minute version of the “Smooth Criminal” music video.

Charlie s Angels

  • Directors:
  • Producers:
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  • Genres: Adventure, Crime, Drama, Action
  • Actors: Kate Jackson, Jaclyn Smith, Farrah Fawcett, Cheryl Ladd, Shelley Hack, Tanya Roberts, David Doyle, John Forsythe

Three women, the Angels (originally Kate Jackson, Farrah Fawcett-Majors, and Jaclyn Smith), graduated from the Los Angeles police academy only to be assigned such duties as handling switchboards and directing traffic. They quit and were hired to work for the Charles Townsend Agency as private investigators. Their boss, Charlie (voiced by John Forsythe), is never seen full face — in some episodes the viewer gets to see the back of his head and his arms, talking through a phone while surrounded by beautiful women — assigning cases to the Angels and his liaison, Bosley (played by David Doyle), via a speaker phone.

Charlie’s Angels is episodic in nature, as opposed to serial, thus each episode shows the Angels finding themselves in new situations in which they would go undercover to investigate. The undercover aspect of the show creates much of the plot interest and tension. In the early seasons of the show, the Angels, under their assumed identities, use a combination of sexual wiles and knowledge learned for the situation in which they are being placed, but by the third and fourth seasons, the writing has a tendency to stray from the sex appeal and focus more on the case at hand.[citation needed]

Logan s Run

  • Directors: Michael Anderson
  • Producers: Saul David, Hugh Benson, Unit Production Manager Byron Roberts
  • Writers: William F Nolan, George Clayton Johnson, David Zelag Goodman
  • Genres: Drama, Fantasy, Romance, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Michael York, Richard Jordan, Jenny Agutter, Peter Ustinov, Farrah Fawcett

The film begins with an on-screen preamble:

Within a domed city, Logan 5 (Michael York) watches as an infant’s hand is implanted with a crystal. The crystal is the baby’s Lifeclock; it changes colour as a person ages. As someone approaches their “Last Day” the Lifeclock begins to blink red, and finally turns black. Logan is a Sandman, responsible for hunting down and killing Runners, people who refuse to report to Carrousel when their Lifeclock begins to blink. Logan is accompanied by his fellow Sandman and friend Francis 7 (Richard Jordan).

The two witness a Carrousel ceremony. In Carrousel, there is the hope of Renewal, a belief that if they have obeyed the rules faithfully, they may be reincarnated. If anyone disobeys, they are “finished forever.” The participants assemble in an arena, then appear to be vapourized while the audience cheers, shouts and chants “Renew!” Although neither Logan nor Francis have known anyone to Renew, Francis believes that Sandmen Renew. After killing a Runner with Francis, Logan gathers the Runner’s personal effects which include a small, silver ankh.

At home searching for some recreational sex, Logan summons someone from “The Circuit” — this is how he meets Jessica 6 (Jenny Agutter), who wears a collar with an ankh pendant. After discussing with Logan why it’s wrong to run, Jessica leaves, deciding not to have sex with him.

Logan and Jessica journey to the city to tell the inhabitants what they’ve learned, and invite the old man to join them. Outside the city domes, the old man waits as Logan and Jessica enter the city. They reach the crowds as they gather for Carrousel and try to explain that they don’t have to die. Logan and Jessica are arrested by several Sandmen and brought before the Sandman central computer for interrogation. Logan resists, but the computer system accesses his mind. When the computer asks if Logan found Sanctuary, his subconscious mind replies that Sanctuary does not exist. This information runs contrary to what the computer considers fact, leading it to decry it as “does not program.” The computer redoubles its efforts to hack into Logan’s mind, diverting increasing power to the interrogation, but continues receiving contrary information from Logan. This causes a cascade failure of cognitive dissonance as a series of chain reactions cause explosions, blasting parts of the city seals open. The populace flees, and the young citizens meet the first old man that they have ever seen.

Daybreakers

  • Directors: Peter Spierig, Michael Spierig
  • Producers: Chris Brown, Sean Furst, Bryan Furst
  • Writers: Peter Spierig, Michael Spierig
  • Genres: Action, Drama, Horror, Thriller
  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe, Sam Neill

In 2019, a plague transforms the world’s population into vampires. With fewer humans to provide blood, the vampires seek to farm the remaining humans and to find a way to continue their existence. A secret team of vampires uncover a way that would rescue the human race.[1]

Halloween

  • Directors: John Carpenter
  • Producers: Debra Hill, John Carpenter, Kool Lusby, Irwin Yablans, Moustapha Akkad
  • Writers: John Carpenter, Debra Hill
  • Genres: Horror, Thriller
  • Actors: Donald Pleasence, Jamie Lee Curtis, Nancy Loomis, P J Soles

On Halloween night 1963, six-year-old Michael Myers (Will Sandin) murders his fifteen[4]-year-old sister Judith (Sandy Johnson) with a large kitchen knife at their home in Haddonfield, Illinois. Almost immediately after, his mother and father arrive home and find him in a trance-like state. They send him to Smith’s Grove – Warren County Sanitarium and he is placed under the care of child psychiatrist Dr. Sam Loomis (Donald Pleasence).

Eight years of treatment lead Loomis to suspect that Michael is nothing less than pure evil. Seven years of trying to keep Myers locked up ends upon his attempted transfer to be prosecuted as an adult. Myers (now 21 years old) escapes from Smith’s Grove, steals the institution’s car, kills a truck driver for his jump suit, and returns to Haddonfield.

Loomis knows where he is going and pursues him. In Haddonfield, Myers stalks teenager Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and some of her friends. At various points throughout the day Laurie sees a man in a white mask (from her classroom window, behind a bush while she walks home, and in the clothesline from her bedroom window).

Later in the evening, Laurie meets her friend Annie Brackett (Nancy Loomis) who is babysitting Lindsey Wallace (Kyle Richards) across the street from where Laurie is babysitting Tommy Doyle (Brian Andrews). After arranging to pick up her boyfriend, Annie sends Lindsey to stay with Laurie at the Doyle house before being murdered by Myers. Tommy sees Myers carrying Annie’s body into the Wallace house and thinks he is the Boogeyman. Laurie dismisses the boy’s terror and sends Tommy and Lindsey to bed. Myers later murders another friend of Laurie’s, Lynda Van Der Klok (P. J. Soles) and Lynda’s boyfriend, Robert “Bob” Simms (John Michael Graham) after they have sex in the empty Wallace house.

Laurie worries for her friends’ safety after receiving a strange phone call from Lynda at the Wallace house. She walks across the street and discovers the three bodies plus Judith Myers’ missing tombstone. She is attacked by Michael Myers but escapes back to the Doyle house. Laurie stabs Myers in the neck with a knitting needle, and in the eye with a clothes hanger, and in the torso with a knife, but he continues to pursue her. Eventually Laurie tells Tommy and Lindsey to go to the Makenzie’s house to call the police than Loomis spots Tommy and Lindsey running from the house and finds Myers in the upstairs hallway. Loomis rescues Laurie from being strangled by Myers, shooting him six times and causing him to fall from the house’s second-story balcony. Upon looking out the window for Myers’ body, however, Loomis discovers that he is nowhere to be found, and the film ends with shots of the Doyle, Wallace, and Myers houses accompanied by heavy breathing.

Stalker

  • Directors: Andrei Tarkovsky
  • Producers: Aleksandra Demidova A
  • Writers: Andrei Tarkovsky, based on the novel by Arkadi Strugatsky, Boris Strugatsky
  • Genres: Adventure, Drama, Fantasy, Mystery, Sci-Fi
  • Actors: Alexander Kaidanovsky, Anatoli Solonitsyn, Nikolai Grinko

The setting of the film is a tiny town on the outskirts of “The Zone”, a wilderness area which has been cordoned off by the government. The film’s main character, the Stalker, works as a guide to bring people in and out of the Zone, to a room which is said to grant “the deepest, innermost” wishes. Residual effects of an unnamed previous occurrence have transformed an otherwise mundane rural area scattered with ruined buildings into an area where the normal laws of physics no longer apply.

The film begins with the Stalker in his home with his wife and daughter. His wife emotionally urges him not to leave her again to go into the Zone due to the legal consequences, but he ignores her pleas. The Stalker goes to a bar, where he meets the Writer and the Professor, who will be his clients on his next trip into the Zone. Writer and Professor are not identified by name—the Stalker prefers to refer to them in this way. The three of them evade the military blockade that guards the Zone using a jeep—attracting gunfire from the guards as they go—and then ride into the heart of the Zone on a railway handcar. The camera follows their passage from urban setting to rural, and from the darkness required for their infiltration of the zone, to light.

The next scene shows the Stalker, Writer, and Professor back in the bar. Stalker’s wife and child arrive. A mysterious black dog that followed the three men through the Zone is now in the bar with them. His wife asks where he got it; Stalker says that it got attached to him and he couldn’t leave it in the Zone. As the Stalker leaves the bar with his family and the dog, we see that his child, nick-named “Monkey” (who earlier dialogue has suggested is affected by some form of genetic mutation as a “child of the Zone”) is crippled, and cannot walk unaided. The film ends with Monkey alone in the kitchen. She recites a poem (written by Fyodor Tyutchev), and then lays her head on the table and appears to telekinetically push three drinking glasses across the table, with one falling to the floor. As the third glass begins to move, a train passes by (as in the beginning of the film), causing the entire apartment to shake, leaving the audience to wonder whether it was Monkey or the vibrations from the train that moved the glasses.[3]

The Uninvited

  • Directors: Charles Guard, Thomas Guard
  • Producers: Michael Grillo, Ivan Reitman, Tom Pollock, Walter F Parkes, Laurie MacDonald, Riyoko Tanaka
  • Writers: Screenplay, Craig Rosenberg, Doug Miro, Carlo Bernard Original Screenplay, Kim Jee Woon
  • Genres: Drama, Horror, Thriller
  • Actors: Emily Browning, Arielle Kebbel, Elizabeth Banks, David Strathairn, Maya Massar, Lex Burnham

The movie begins with a young girl, Anna (Emily Browning), making out with her boyfriend Matt on the beach at a party. While this is happening, you hear Anna’s voice: “I’m on a beach”, implying that she is describing a dream. After a few moments he tells Anna he loves her and has “a condom”, she tells him she just can’t do it, gets up, and leaves. As she goes, her sister Alex (Arielle Kebbel) asks if everything is all right. She ignores her, and Alex goes back to what she was doing. On the way to her house she travels through the woods. Anna encounters three garbage bags lying around. She pauses, then goes to pass them when one of them twitches and shakes. She approaches it cautiously when it falls open and the dirty, twisted body of a young red haired girl falls out. As Anna stands, shocked, the head suddenly twists around and looks at her and says “Don’t go home”. Screaming and afraid, Anna runs home. She then hears a bell, which later is implied that was worn by her terminally ill mother and rung when she needed something. When she walks in, she states that her mother is alone but that she should never be alone. She enters the front of the house. Again, her voice narates, saying “Something is wrong. There’s something evil in the house.” It is coming from her father’s study. As Anna aproaches it, blood begins to pour from the keyhole. Suddenly, random clips begin to play, including a falling watering pail and a shattering glass orb. The dream ends, and Anna is revealed talking to a psychiatrist.

While Anna is back at the institution she says to her psychologist that she did what he had told her to, she had “finished what she started”. It is also revealed that the institutionalized woman at the beginning was “Mildred Kemp”. (Which makes sense, because Mildred asked “who am I going to tell my stories to?,” which means that while Anna moved back into the house, she was remembering the stories Mildred had told her, and putting them into her own version). To explain the matter of pearls, Mildred took them from the Wright family mother and wife, and it can be seen at the end of the movie that Mildred has the pearls in her hands while she closes her room’s door . It seems that it is only a coincidence that Rachel also has a pearl necklace, as there can’t be any relationship between Rachel and Mildred. It also shows that when Rachel was listenning in on them, she was actually worried because Anna was talking to herself. No one ever spoke directly to Alex or interacted with her except Anna; she never sent letters, and that was why her father ignored her. The last things you see are Anna smiling, and then the door across the hall shuts, showing the residents name: ‘Mildred Kemp’.